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  • This report presents the results of seabed mapping and habitat classification surveys completed in Darwin Harbour during 2011 and 2013 as part of the Northern Territory Government's marine habitat mapping program. This research aims to provide baseline data on the existing marine habitats and characteristics of the Darwin Harbour region. It is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Department of Land Resource Management (DLRM) and the Darwin Port Corporation. Key objectives are to: - Produce detailed maps of the bathymetry and derived parameters such as slope and rugosity, - Classify the seabed into areas of hard and soft substrate, and, - Produce seabed habitat maps (or seascapes). Data collection was completed in two stages comprising a multibeam survey, undertaken on the MV Matthew Flinders in 2011 by DLRMs predecessor, the Department of Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts and Sport (NRETAS), GA, AIMS and the Darwin Port Corporation; and, a seabed sampling survey undertaken in 2013 on the MV John Hickman, by DLRM and GA. Data acquired from the surveys included continuous high-resolution multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter, video and still camera observations of seabed habitats and biological communities, and physical samples of seabed sediments. Key outcomes from the surveys include: 1. Improved understanding of the seabed of Darwin Harbour. The main seabed geomorphic features identified in Darwin Harbour include banks, ridges, plains and scarps, and a deep central channel that divides into smaller and shallower channels. Acoustically hard substrates are found mostly on banks and are associated with rocky reef and sponge gardens, and are often overlain by a thin veneer of sandy sediment. In contrast, plains and channels are characterised by acoustically soft substrates and are associated with fine sediments (mud and sand). 2. Classification of physical seabed properties to produce a Seascape Map for Darwin Harbour. Six seascape classes (potential habitats) were derived using an Iterative Self Organising (ISO) unsupervised classification scheme. These six classes are related to statistically unique combinations of seabed substrate, relief, bedform and presence of sediment veneer (quite often inferred from presence of epibenthic biota). The results presented in this report demonstrate the utility of multibeam acoustic data to broadly and objectively characterise the seabed to describe the spatial distribution of key benthic habitats. This is particularly important technique in high-turbidity settings such as Darwin Harbour where the application of satellite and aerial remote sensing techniques can be limited. The results of this study will be used for the planning and analysis of data from upcoming benthic biodiversity studies as they: - Provide robust near-continuous physical variables that can be used to predictive modelling of biodiversity; - Provide high-resolution coverage of near-continuous variables that describe the key physical characteristic of the seabed of the harbour, and; - Enhance survey sample design by providing indicative locations of likely similar biology communities.

  • The map covers an area of 0.82 degrees longitude by 0.92 degrees latitude or about 82 kilometres from east to west and about 63 kilometres from north to south. This map contains natural and constructed features including roads, foot tracks, hydrography, vegetation, contours (interval 20m), localities and some administrative boundaries. The reverse side of the map depicts the same area using a satellite image with an overlay of major roads, foot tracks, tourism features and facilities as well as insets featuring Uluru, Kata Tjuta and Yulara. This is map 3 of Australia's Red Centre National Landscapes series.

  • Displays the coverage of publicly available digital gamma-ray spectrometric data. The map legend is coloured according to the line spacing of the survey with broader line spacings (lower resolution surveys) displayed in lighter shades of blue and coral. Closer line spacings (higher resolution surveys are displayed in red, dark blue and purple.

  • Displays the coverage of publicly available digital aeromagnetic data. The map legend is coloured according to the line spacing of the survey with broader line spacings (lower resolution surveys) displayed in shades of lighter blue and coral. Closer line spacings (higher resolution surveys are displayed in red, dark blue and purple.

  • Displays the coverage of publicly available digital gamma-ray spectrometric data. The map legend is coloured according to the line spacing of the survey with broader line spacings (lower resolution surveys) displayed in shades of blue. Closer line spacings (higher resolution surveys are displayed in red, purple and coral.

  • Geoscience Australia has completed the first phase of an areal map of Australia's coastal geomorphological units. Utilising pre-existing GIS datasets procured from local, state and federal government agencies, this national scale map conforms to a coastal geomorphology classification scheme developed at Geoscience Australia. Phase one consists of a geodatabase containing a series of state wide feature datasets that have been reclassified into the national coastal geomorphology classification scheme.

  • Geoscience Australia has produced digital geological and lithology maps of the Arltunga-Harts Range Region in the eastern Arunta Region of the Northern Territory using a scanned image of the first edition hardcopy map published by the Bureau of Mineral Resources in 1984. The image was digitised using Microstation and ArcInfo software, and attributed to meet the Version 2004.01 of the Geoscience Australia Digital Data Dictionary for GIS Products as closely as possible. The finished product has been provided as ArcView shape files and ArcInfo coverages on CD-ROM. Extensive internal quality assurance and control has been perfomed on the layers.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.