From 1 - 10 / 408
  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • This map is designed to show broad regolith-landform units, giving a regional overview of the main regolith types and their associated landforms.Included are the author's detailed Explanatory Notes to the map.

  • Improving techniques for mapping land surface composition at regional- to continental-scale is the next step in delivering the benefits of remote sensing technology to Australia. New methodologies and collaborative efforts have been made as part of a multi-agency project to facilitate uptake of these techniques. Calibration of ASTER data with HyMAP has been very promising, and following an program in Queensland, a mosaic has been made for the Gawler-Curnamona region in South Australia. These programs, undertaken by Geoscience Australia, CSIRO, and state and industry partners, aims to refine and standardise processing and to make them easily integrated with other datasets in a GIS.

  • Catchment outlet sediments (0-10 cm depth, sieved to <2 mm) collected at a very low density over most of the Australian continent have been analysed using the Mobile Metal Ion (MMI®) partial extraction technique. Of the 54 elements analysed, eight are generally regarded as essential nutrients for plant growth: Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn. For these, 'bioavailability', defined here as the ratio of the partial digest concentration to the total concentration, has been investigated. This estimation of 'bioavailability' gives results comparable with standard agricultural measurements. Average 'bioavailability' ranges from 15.0% for Ca to 0.1% for Fe. Smoothed (kriged) colour contour maps for continental Australia have been produced for these eight nutrients and interpreted in terms of lithology (e.g., presence of carbonates in the MMI® Ca map), mineralization (e.g., well known and possibly less known mineral districts in the Cu, P and Zn maps), environmental processes (e.g., salinity in K map, weathering and acid generation in Fe map) and agricultural practices (e.g., application of fertilizers in P and Zn maps). This first application of a partial extraction technique at the scale of a continent has yielded meaningful, coherent and interpretable results.

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • This glossary has been written to compile a single reference for terms commonly used in regolith science, to bring consistency and uniformity to the terminology of regolith science, and to explain the way words have been used in the regolith literature

  • Inland sulfidic soils have recently formed throughout wetlands of the Murray River floodplain associated with increased salinity and river regulation (Lamontagne et al., 2006). Sulfides have the potential to cause widespread environmental degradation both within sulfidic soils and down stream depending on the amount of carbonate available to neutralise acidity (Dent, 1986). Sulfate reduction is facilitated by organic carbon decomposition, however, little is known about the sources of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate or the process of sulfide accumulation within inland sulfidic wetlands. This investigation uses stable isotopes from organic carbon (13C and 15N), inorganic sulfur (34S) and carbonate (13C and 18O) to elucidate the sources and cycling of sulfur and carbon within sulfidic soils of the Loveday Disposal Basin.

  • ABSTRACT: Building on method developments achieved during a series of precursor pilot projects, the National Geochemical Survey of Australia (NGSA) project targets catchment outlet (overbank) sediments as a uniform sampling medium. These transported, fine-grained materials are collected (from a shallow and a deeper level) near the lowest point of 1390 catchments, which cover 91% of the country. Dry and moist Munsell® colour, soil pH and electrical conductivity and pH of 1:5 (soil:water) slurries are recorded and laser particle size analysis and infrared spectroscopy are performed. The dried samples are sieved into two grain-size fractions (<2 mm and <75 mm) that are analysed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively-coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (multi-element, total analyses), by ICP-MS after aqua regia digestion (multi-element, including low level gold), and specialised methods for platinum group elements, fluorine and selenium. At the time of writing, 78% of the samples have been collected and most analyses are completed for the first 25% of samples. The project is due for completion in June 2011.