From 1 - 10 / 290
  • Mineral exploration in Australia faces the challenge of declining discovery rates despite continued exploration investment. The UNCOVER roadmap, developed by stakeholders from industry, government and academia, has highlighted the need for discovering mineral resources in areas of cover. In these areas, potentially prospective basement is covered by regolith, including transported sediment, challenging many traditional exploration methods designed to probe outcrop or shallow subcrop. Groundwater-mineral interaction in the subsurface has the potential to give the water geochemical and isotopic characteristics that may persist over time and space. Geoscience Australia’s hydrogeochemistry for mineral exploration project, part of the Exploring for the Future Programme, aims to use groundwater chemistry to better understand the bedrock-regolith system and develop new methods for recognising mineral system footprints within and below cover. During the 2017 dry season (May to September), ~150 groundwater samples (including QC samples) were collected from pastoral and water supply bores in the regions of Tennant Creek and McArthur River, Northern Territory. The Tennant Creek region has a demonstrated iron oxide-hosted copper-gold-iron(-bismuth) mineral potential in the Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic basement and vast areas of regolith cover. Among the critical elements of this mineral system, the presence/absence of redox contrasts, iron enrichment, presence of sulfide minerals, and carbonaceous intervals can potentially be diagnosed by the elemental and isotopic composition of groundwater. The McArthur River region, in contrast, has demonstrated sediment-hosted stratiform lead-zinc-silver mineral potential in the Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic basement and also vast areas of regolith cover. Here, critical mineral system elements that have the potential to be identified using groundwater geochemistry include the presence of felsic rocks (lead source), carbonate rocks (zinc source), basinal brines, dolomitic black shales (traps), and evaporite-rich sequences. Preliminary results will be presented and interpreted in the context of these mineral systems.

  • This glossary has been written to compile a single reference for terms commonly used in regolith science, to bring consistency and uniformity to the terminology of regolith science, and to explain the way words have been used in the regolith literature

  • Provides regional framework study of regolith and associated landforms over the Tanami region. Datasets are all contained in a GIS - these include regolith-landform units, enhanced Landsat TM imagery, site descriptions and photo links, regolith profiles descriptions (geochemistry and PIMA), drill hole geochemistry, gamma-ray spectrometry imagery, palaeochannels, geochemical sampling strategy maps, surface flow vector maps, enhanced DEMs, erosional scarps and maps showing depth of transported cover.

  • Map(s) of F (fluorine) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of Hf (hafnium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of In (indium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of Se (selenium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)