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  • This dataset contains the limit and extent of Northern Australia as defined by the Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility Act 2016 (https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2021C00228) and Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility Amendment (Extension and Other Measures) Act 2021 (https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd2021a/21bd062).

  • This service represents the National Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 1 Second Percentage Slope product, derived from the National DEM SRTM 1 Second. Slope measures the inclination of the land surface from the horizontal. Percent slope represents this inclination as the ratio of change in height to distance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Urapunga, NT, 1994 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1994 by the NT Government, and consisted of 68000 line-kilometres of data at 500m line spacing and 100m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 100m) and shows potassium element concentration of the SA Exploration Initiative 1995 - Area B30, Palm Valley, NT, 1987. survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the SA Government, and consisted of 38052 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Buchanan, NT, 2002 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2002 by the NT Government, and consisted of 84000 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows potassium element concentration of the SA Exploration Initiative, Area D3, 1994 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1994 by the SA Government, and consisted of 16682 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000417 degrees (approximately 40m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Naretha, WA, 2009 (Eucla Basin 3) survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2009 by the WA Government, and consisted of 124798 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 50m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000493 degrees (approximately 50m) and shows uranium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000, Area S, Braidwood, NSW 2001 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in UNKNOWN by the NSW Government, and consisted of 19000 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000417 degrees (approximately 40m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Flinders Island, Tasmania, 2007 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2007 by the Tas Government, and consisted of 18635 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 90m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.00125 degrees (approximately 130m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Tanami, NT, 1989 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1989 by the NT Government, and consisted of 40179 line-kilometres of data at 500m line spacing and 90m terrain clearance.