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  • A colour poster comparing the concepts in the computer game Minecraft with the geology of particular minerals and rocks. Aimed at school children, for display in classrooms. Designed to be printed at A2, but can also be printed smaller.

  • This is an education product for primary and lower secondary school use. The poster illustrates that all rock types can be changed to different types of rock by natural processes. There is simple information on the features of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks together with images of selected rock samples. The poster supports concepts about the earth being ever-changing.

  • The Australian Seismological Report 2013 provides a summary of earthquake activity for Australia for 2013. It also provides a summary of earthquakes of Magnitude 5+ in the Australian region, as well as an summary of magnitude 6+ earthquakes worldwide. It has dedicated state and territory earthquake information including: largest earthquakes in the year; largest earthquakes in the state; and tables detailing all earthquakes detected by Geoscience Australia during the year. There are also contributions from Department for Manufacturing, Innovation, Trade, Resources and Energy (DMITRE) and Environmental Systems & Services (ES&S) describing seismic networks and providing earthquake locations.

  • Explore important concepts about minerals and crystals using this comprehensive teaching resource. Includes sections on identifying minerals, significant minerals and gem resources in Australia and the uses of crystals. This 101 page colour booklet is suitable for use by Year 8 Science teachers, but sections could also be used in a primary setting such as crystal shape models. Extension material appropriate for senior Earth and Environmental Science classes. Student activities include suggested answers.

  • Explore important concepts about the Australian coastline using this comprehensive teaching resource. Includes sections on formation of coasts, erosion, estuaries and deltas, reefs and human impact on coasts. Also contains Australian case studies. This 103 page colour booklet is suitable for use by primary and high school teachers. Student activities include suggested answers.

  • Explore important concepts about earthquakes using this comprehensive 85 page teaching resource. Includes case studies of significant Australian earthquakes. Suitable for primary level Year 6 and secondary Year 9. Extension material appropriate for senior Earth and Environmental Science classes. Student activities for upper primary to senior secondary students, including suggested answers. Please note: The size of some the historical earthquakes referred to within this product may have been revised, for more information please follow the link at below to "Revisions to Australia's historical earthquakes."

  • This resource contains bathymetry and backscatter data for the Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) in the Timor Sea collected by Geoscience Australia during September and October 2012 on RV Solander (survey GA0339/SOL5650). The survey used a Kongsberg EM3002 300 kHz multibeam sonar system mounted in single head configuration to map four areas, covering a combined area of 507 square kilometres. Data are gridded to 2 m spatial resolution. The Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve survey was undertaken as an activity within the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program Marine Biodiversity Hub and was the key component of Research Theme 4 - Regional Biodiversity Discovery to Support Marine Bioregional Plans. Hub partners involved in the survey included the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Geoscience Australia, the University of Western Australia, Museum Victoria and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. Data acquired during the survey included: multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; sub-bottom acoustic profiles; physical samples of seabed sediments, infauna and epibenthic biota; towed underwater video and still camera observations of seabed habitats; baited video observations of demersal and pelagic fish, and; oceanographic measurements of the water column from CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) casts and from deployment of sea surface drifters. Further information on the survey is available in the post-survey report published as Geoscience Australia Record 2013/38 (Nichol et al. 2013).

  • Tsunami hazard maps are generated for the Mentawai Islands, West Sumatra, Indonesia, to support evacuation and disaster response planning. A random heterogeneous slip generator is used to forward model a suite of earthquake rupture scenarios on the Mentawai Segment of the Sunda Subduction Zone. A total of 1000 rupture models that fit constraints provided by coral and geodetic records of coseismic vertical deformation from great earthquakes in 1797, 1833 and 2007 are used to model inundation and define a maximum inundation zone that envelopes all of these scenarios. Results are compared with single scenario hazard assessments developed by experts and agreed through scientific consensus building processes to assess the additional value of modelling a suite of scenarios to obtain a more robust estimate of potential inundated areas by incorporating uncertainty in the earthquake source. The model presented here, like all tsunami hazard assessments, is based on assumptions about the characteristics of future events based on past events, however by sampling a range of plausible outcomes we gain a more robust estimate of which areas may be inundated during a tsunami within the bounds of our assumptions.

  • This study investigates whether four different Synthetic Finite Fault Models (SFFM) can simulate stochastic earthquake tsunami with similar statistical properties to real earthquake-tsunami events. The latter are represented using heterogenous slip distributions from Finite Fault Inversions (FFI) for oceanic subduction interface earthquakes. To apply the SFFM, regression relations are developed between earthquake moment magnitude and parameters controlling the slip roughness, using a new method to fit SFFM to FFI. SFFM with more capacity to spatially localize slip are better able to simulate higher-slip regions on the FFI, which have the most in fluence on tsunami inundation in our simulations. The tsunami inundation associated with the FFI and SFFM is computed in two-dimensions over idealised topography. The best-performing SFFM generates tsunami inundation which envelopes the FFI inundation in 77% of cases using ten synthetic events (close to the ideal value of 82%), while the other SFFM show greater tendencies to underestimate inundation. These differences are related to the capacity of each SFFM to produce spatially localised slip distributions. The results highlight that SFFM cannot be assumed to reliably quantify uncertainties in the tsunami inundation of real earthquakes, and the use of untested SFFM could create non-conservative bias in tsunami hazard assessments. However the most successful model used here performs quite well, although it probably underestimates inundation for small earthquakes more often than an optimal model.

  • The Cadell Fault, found in stable continental region (SCR) crust in southeastern Australia, provides a record of temporally clustered morphogenic earthquakes spanning much of the Cenozoic. The slip rate, averaged over perhaps as many as five complete seismic cycles in the period 70–20 ka, is c. 0.4–0.5 mm/a, compared with an average rate of c. 0.005–0.01 mm/a over the period spanning the late Miocene to Recent. If full length rupture of the 80 km long feature is assumed, the average recurrence for Mw 7.3–7.5 earthquake events on the Cadell Fault in the period 70–20 ka is c. 8 kyr. About 20 kyr, representing more than two average seismic cycles, have lapsed since the most recent morphogenic seismic event on the fault. It might therefore be speculated that this fault has relapsed into a quiescent period. Episodic rupture behaviour on the Cadell Fault, and nearby faults in Phanerozoic SCR crust in eastern Australia, might be controlled by their linkage into major crustal fault systems at depth, in apparent contrast with the style of deformation in non-extended Precambrian SCR crust. Periods of strain localization on these major crustal fault systems, effectively turning deforming regions ‘on’ and ‘off’, might be influenced by changes in distant plate boundary forces. If proved, this would have profound consequences for how the occurrence of large earthquakes is assessed in Australia, as the fundamental assumption of morphogenic earthquakes occurring as a result of the progressive build-up of strain, and thus being in some way predictable in their periodicity, is not satisfied. Documenting such fault behaviour in SCR crust assists in conceptualizing the points critical to understanding the hazards posed by SCR faults worldwide.