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  • <p>This data package includes raw (Level 0) and reprocessed (Level 1) HyLogging data from 25 wells in the Georgina Basin, onshore Australia. This work was commissioned by Geoscience Australia, and includes an accompanying meta-data report that documents the data processing steps undertaken and a description of the various filters (scalars) used in the processed datasets. <p>Please note: Data can be made available on request to ClientServices@ga.gov.au

  • The Carbon Infrastructure Assessment and Planning (CIAP) Tile Index System is a set of nested tile indexes from 1:25000 through to 1:10000000 scales based on the ICSM map indexes. The product has been generated for use at national scale based in GDA94 projection. This product supports the best available information system (BAIS)as used by the CIAP application.

  • Four of Australia's largest five population centres are topographically constrained by prominent escarpments (i.e. Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide). These escarpments are underlain by faults or fault complexes capable of hosting damaging earthquakes. Paleoseismological investigations over the last decade indicate that the seismogenic character (e.g. recurrence and magnitude) of these structures varies markedly. Uplift rates on range bounding faults in the Mount Lofty Ranges suggest average recurrence times on individual faults for Mmax earthquakes (MW 7.1-7.4) in the order of 10-20 ka. A high density of faults with demonstrated Late Quaternary surface rupture occurring proximally to Adelaide suggests recurrence times for damaging ground shaking at a given location from earthquakes on these faults in the hundreds to low thousands of years. Uplift rates on faults proximal to Melbourne (and the Latrobe Valley, where much of Melbourne's power is generated) in some cases exceed those of the Mount Lofty Ranges. However, a lower relative density of seismogenic faults proximal to the conurbation of Melbourne is suggestive of a lesser hazard than for Adelaide. In contrast to Melbourne and Adelaide, paleoseismological investigations on the Darling Fault near Perth, and the Lapstone Structural Complex near Sydney, indicate average recurrence for Mmax events in the hundreds of thousands to millions of years. Of course, distal larger events and proximal sub-Mmax events have been demonstrated to be damaging in these areas (e.g. 1968 Ms6.8 Meckering, 1989 ML5.6 Newcastle). The same is true for Adelaide and Melbourne (e.g. 1954 ML5.4 Adelaide, 2012 ML 5.4 Moe). Further research is required to demonstrate that earthquakes of sub-morphogenic and morphogenic magnitude might be modelled on the same Guttenberg-Richter distribution curve.

  • The Timor Sea and its tropical marine environment support significant and growing economic activity including oil and gas exploration. To reduce uncertainty in decision making regarding the sustainable use and ongoing protection of these marine resources, environmental managers and resource users require sound scientific information on the composition and stability of seabed environments and their biological assemblages. Surveys SOL4934 and SOL5117 to the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf were undertaken in August and September 2009 and July and August 2010 respectively, in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, with research collaborations from the RAN Australian Hydrographic Office, the Geological Survey of Canada and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. The purpose of these surveys were to develop biophysical maps, and deliver data and information products pertaining to complex seabed environment of the Van Diemen Rise and identify potential geohazards and unique, sensitive environments that relate to offshore infrastructure. This dataset comprises sediment oxygen demand measurments made on the upper 2 cm of seabed sediments. Some relevant publications are listed below: 1. Heap, A.D., Przeslawski, R., Radke, L., Trafford, J., Battershill, C. and Shipboard Party. 2010. Seabed environments of the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Northern Australia: SOL4934 Post Survey Report. Geoscience Australia Record 2010/09, pp.81. 2. Anderson, T.J., Nichol, S., Radke, L., Heap, A.D., Battershill, C., Hughes, M., Siwabessy, P.J., Barrie, V., Alvarez de Glasby, B., Tran, M., Daniell, J. & Shipboard Party, 2011b. Seabed Environments of the Eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Northern Australia: GA0325/Sol5117 - Post-Survey Report. Geoscience Australia, Record 2011/08, 58pp. 3. Radke, L.C., Li, J., Douglas, G., Przeslawski, R., Nichol, S, Siwabessy, J., Huang, Z., Trafford, J., Watson, T. and Whiteway, T. Characterising sediments of a tropical sediment-starved continental shelf using cluster analysis of physical and geochemical variables. Environmental Chemistry, in press

  • The Timor Sea and its tropical marine environment support significant and growing economic activity including oil and gas exploration. To reduce uncertainty in decision making regarding the sustainable use and ongoing protection of these marine resources, environmental managers and resource users require sound scientific information on the composition and stability of seabed environments and their biological assemblages. Surveys SOL4934 and SOL5117 to the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf were undertaken in August and September 2009 and July and August 2010 respectively, in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, with research collaborations from the RAN Australian Hydrographic Office, the Geological Survey of Canada and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. The purpose of these surveys were to develop biophysical maps, and deliver data and information products pertaining to complex seabed environment of the Van Diemen Rise and identify potential geohazards and unique, sensitive environments that relate to offshore infrastructure. This dataset comprises inorganic chemistry of seabed sediments (0-2cm). Some relevant publications are listed below: 1. Heap, A.D., Przeslawski, R., Radke, L., Trafford, J., Battershill, C. and Shipboard Party. 2010. Seabed environments of the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Northern Australia: SOL4934 Post Survey Report. Geoscience Australia Record 2010/09, pp.81. 2. Anderson, T.J., Nichol, S., Radke, L., Heap, A.D., Battershill, C., Hughes, M., Siwabessy, P.J., Barrie, V., Alvarez de Glasby, B., Tran, M., Daniell, J. & Shipboard Party, 2011b. Seabed Environments of the Eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Northern Australia: GA0325/Sol5117 - Post-Survey Report. Geoscience Australia, Record 2011/08, 58pp. 3. Radke, L.C., Li, J., Douglas, G., Przeslawski, R., Nichol, S, Siwabessy, J., Huang, Z., Trafford, J., Watson, T. and Whiteway, T. Characterising sediments of a tropical sediment-starved continental shelf using cluster analysis of physical and geochemical variables. Environmental Chemistry, in press

  • Knowledge of the nature of buildings within CBD areas is fundamental to a broad range of decision making processes, including planning, emergency management and the mitigation of the impact of natural hazards. To support these activities, Geoscience Australia has developed a building information system called the National Exposure Information System (NEXIS) which provides information on buildings across Australia. Most of the building level information in NEXIS is statistically derived, but efforts are being made to include more detailed information on the nature of individual buildings, particularly in CBD areas. This is being achieved in Melbourne through field survey work.

  • This is a collection of multimedia products of data visualisations showing sea floor terrain in the MH370 search area and associated public communications regarding the search and Phase 1 data release. The video flythroughs and data visualisations were developed from a sample of bathymetric data from Phase 1 collected as part of the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. This includes all visualisations (images and videos) used in the 'Data behind the search for MH370' Story Map. This also contains the translated versions of the MH370 Story Map on ESRIOnline ("the Data behind the search for MH370") into Malay and Chinese.

  • The Christmas Island Vegetation and Clearing Map was developed through a collaborative project by Geoscience Australia, Christmas Island Phosphates, and Christmas Island National Park during the 2013/2014 financial year. The map classifies the full extent of Christmas Island into vegetation and land cover classes. The dataset contains four attribute fields; - Level 1 classification - Level 2 classification - Mean tree height (Mean_TreeH) - Area (square m) The majority of data was gathered in 2011, with an exception being the rehabilitation boundaries which are up to date as of May 2014. The data represent the best position achievable with the limited resources available during the project's timespan. Geoscience Australia recognises that some data inputs could be improved with additional field checking. The boundaries of cleared areas have been verified in some cases only and may extend into primary, uncleared vegetation in places; ground-truth verification is strongly advised. Consequently, this information should not be relied upon as the sole information source when making operational decisions.

  • Geoscience Australia has a leading role in the Australian Government's Open Data Network. Over the past few years Geoscience Australia has, in partnership with agencies across the Australian Government, including the Department of Communications and the Department of Finance, delivered a series of projects that have cemented Geoscience Australia's role as a leading exemplar of Open Data in the Australian Government. These projects have included the recent release of the National Map; FIND - a spatial search engine across government data providers; providing over 80 per cent of the data that is published on data.gov.au; implementation of Creative Commons licensing for the majority of our data; and Geoscience Australia's sponsorship of GovHack.

  • Gravity data measure small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data are collected on geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.