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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Magnetic Anomaly Map of Australia, Seventh Edition, 2019 TMI Greyscale image is a greyscale image of the TMI grid of the Magnetic Anomaly Map of Australia, Seventh Edition, 2019. The 2019 Total magnetic Intensity (TMI) grid of Australia has a grid cell size of ~3 seconds of arc (approximately 80 m). This grid only includes airborne-derived TMI data for onshore and near-offshore continental areas. Since the sixth edition was released in 2015, data from 234 new surveys have been added to the database, acquired mainly by the State and Territory Geological Surveys. The new grid was derived from a re-levelling of the national magnetic grid database. The survey grids were levelled to each other, and to the Australia Wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS), which serves as a baseline to constrain long wavelengths in the final grid. It is estimated that 33 500 000 line-kilometres of survey data were acquired to produce the 2019 grid data, about 2 000 000 line-kilometres more than for the previous edition. The grid used to produce this greyscale image has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 80m). This greyscale image shows the magnetic response of subsurface features with contrasting magnetic susceptibilities. The image can also be used to locate structural features such as dykes.

  • The coverage of this dataset is over the Taree region . The C3 LAS data set contains point data in LAS 1.2 format sourced from a LiDAR ( Light Detection and Ranging ) from an ALS50 ( Airborne Laser Scanner ) sensor . The processed data has been manually edited to achieve LPI classification level 3 whereby the ground class contains minimal non-ground points such as vegetation , water , bridges , temporary features , jetties etc . Purpose: To provide fit-for-purpose elevation data for use in applications related to coastal vulnerability assessment, natural resource management ( especially water and forests) , transportation and urban planning . Additional lineage information: This data has an accuracy of 0.3m ( 95 confidence ) horizontal with a minimum point density of one laser pulse per square metre. For more information on the data's accuracy, refer to the lineage provided in the data history .

  • Multibeam bathymetry gridded at 20m resolution and projected to WGS84 UTM zone 50S from the North Perth Survey (GA reference GA-0332).

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • <b>BACKGROUND</b> <p> <p>The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Landsat satellite program has been capturing images of the Australian continent for more than 30 years. This data is highly useful for land and coastal mapping studies. <p>In particular, the light reflected from the Earth’s surface (surface reflectance) is important for monitoring environmental resources – such as agricultural production and mining activities – over time. <p>We need to make accurate comparisons of imagery acquired at different times, seasons and geographic locations. However, inconsistencies can arise due to variations in atmospheric conditions, sun position, sensor view angle, surface slope and surface aspect. These need to be reduced or removed to ensure the data is consistent and can be compared over time. <p>&nbsp</p> <b>WHAT THIS PRODUCT OFFERS</b> <p> <p>GA Landsat 5 TM Analysis Ready Data Collection 3 takes Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery captured over the Australian continent and corrects for inconsistencies across land and coastal fringes. The result is accurate and standardised surface reflectance data, which is instrumental in identifying and quantifying environmental change. <p> <p>The TM instrument is an advanced, multispectral scanning, Earth resources sensor which is designed to categorise the Earth's surface. It is particularly useful for agricultural applications and identification of land use. <p> <p>This product is a single, cohesive Analysis Ready Data (ARD) package, which allows you to analyse surface reflectance data as is, without the need to apply additional corrections. <p> <p>It contains three sub-products that provide corrections or attribution information: <p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;1) GA Landsat 5 TM NBAR Collection 3 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;2) GA Landsat 5 TM NBART Collection 3 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;3) GA Landsat 5 TM OA Collection 3 <p> <p>The resolution is a 30 m grid based on the USGS Landsat Collection 1 archive.

  • There is significant interest in Australia, both federally and at the state level, to develop a hydrogen production industry. Australia’s Chief Scientist, Alan Finkel, recently prepared a briefing paper for the COAG Energy Council outlining a road map for hydrogen. It identifies hydrogen has the potential to be a significant source of export revenue for Australia in future years, assist with decarbonising Australia’s economy and could establish Australia as a leader in low emission fuel production. As part of the ongoing investigations into the hydrogen production potential of Australia, Geoscience Australia has been commissioned by the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science to develop heat maps that show areas with high potential for future hydrogen production. The study is technology agnostic, in that it considers hydrogen production via electrolysis using renewable energy sources and also fossil fuel hydrogen coupled with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The heat maps presented in this work are synthesized from the key individual national-scale datasets that are relevant for hydrogen production. In the case of hydrogen from electrolysis, renewable energy potential and the availability of water are the most important factors, with various infrastructural considerations playing a secondary role. In the case of fossil fuel hydrogen, proximity to gas and coal resources, water and availability of carbon storage sites are the important parameters that control the heat maps. In this report we present 5 different heat map scenarios, reflecting different assumptions in the geospatial analysis and also reflecting to some degree the different projected timeframes for hydrogen production. The first three scenarios pertain to renewable energy and hydrogen produced by electrolysis. Differences between the three scenarios depend on whether hydrogen is produced near the coastal areas, where infrastructure and water are not issues or whether hydrogen can be produced in inland areas provided water does become a constraining factor. Assumptions regarding the proximity of a currently connected electrical grid to transport renewable energy also play a large role in the different scenarios. The final two scenarios focus on the potential for fossil fuel hydrogen, coupled with CCS, with the difference between the two scenarios being related to the timeframes for readiness for both fossil fuel production and availability of CO2 storage resources. This dataset includes the five scenario raster outputs as produced as part of the Prospective hydrogen production regions of Australia report.

  • Digital Elevation Model data record the terrain height variations from the processed point-located data recorded on an airborne geophysical survey.  The aircraft altimeter data records the height of the aircraft above the ground and the aircraft GPS records the height of the aircraft above the ellipsoid.  Subtracting the two values enables the height of the terrain beneath the aircraft relative to the ellipsoid to be calculated.  This ellipsoidal terrain height is corrected for the variation between the ellipsoid and the geoid (the n-value correction) to produce terrain heights relative to sea level.

  • This GIS data package contains airborne electromagnetic (AEM) datasets and interpreted data products for the Robinvale-Boundary Bend survey area, as part of the River Murray Corridor (RMC) Salinity Mapping and Interpretation Project. The RMC project was undertaken between 2006 and 2010 to provide information on a range of salinity and land management issues along a 450 kilometre reach of the Murray River from the South Australian border to Gunbower, northwest of Echuca in Victoria. The Robinvale-Boundary Bend survey area extends from Robinvale to the north of Wakool junction. This metadata briefly describes the contents of the data package. The user guide included in the package contains more detailed information about the individual datasets and available technical reports. The main components in the package are: AEM data and images derived from a holistic inversion of the RMC RESOLVE AEM survey; a composite digital elevation model (DEM); a range of interpreted data products designed to map key elements of the hydrogeological system and salinity hazards using the AEM dataset; and a series of ESRI ArcGIS map documents. The AEM data component consists of grids and images of modelled conductivity data derived from a holistic inversion of the RMC RESOLVE AEM survey. They include: layer conductivity grids below ground surface; depth slice grids representing the average conductivity of various regular depth intervals below ground surface; floodplain slice grids representing the average conductivity of various depth intervals relative to the elevation above or below a surface that approximates the River Murray floodplain; watertable slice grids representing the average conductivity of various intervals relative to the elevation above or below the regional watertable; and AEM cross sections of conductivity versus depth along each of the flight lines. The holistic inversion AEM data are derived from the 'River Murray Corridor RESOLVE AEM Survey, VIC & NSW, 2007 Final Data (P1141)', available as Geoscience Australia product number 67212 (GeoCat #67212). The DEM data component consists of a 10 metre horizontal resolution composite DEM for the River Murray Corridor AEM survey area derived from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) surveys, AEM surveys and the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) survey. The interpreted data component is organised into product themes to: address salinity and land management questions; and to map key elements of the hydrogeological system and salinity hazards. An ArcGIS map document is included for each product theme. The products include: Blanchetown Clay; conductive soils; flush zones; groundwater conductivity; stratigraphic extents and reliability; near surface conductive zones; near surface resistive zones; Parilla Sands; Quaternary alluvium; recharge; salt store; surface salt; vegetation health; and Woorinen Formation. The RMC project was funded through the National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality with additional funding from the Lower Murray Catchment Management Authority (CMA), Mallee CMA, Goulburn-Murray Water and the Murray-Darling Basin Authority. The project was administered by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry through the Bureau of Rural Sciences, now known as the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES). Geoscience Australia (GA) were contracted to provide geophysical services to manage the AEM system selection and data acquisition, and to process and calibrate the AEM data. The AEM survey was flown by Fugro Airborne Geophysical Services in 2007 using the helicopter-borne RESOLVE frequency domain system. The Cooperative Research Centre for Landscape Environments and Mineral Exploration was sub-contracted through GA to manage the interpretation and reporting component of the RMC project.

  • This GIS data package contains airborne electromagnetic (AEM) datasets and interpreted data products for the Liparoo-Robinvale survey area, as part of the River Murray Corridor (RMC) Salinity Mapping and Interpretation Project. The RMC project was undertaken between 2006 and 2010 to provide information on a range of salinity and land management issues along a 450 kilometre reach of the Murray River from the South Australian border to Gunbower, northwest of Echuca in Victoria. The Liparoo-Robinvale survey area extends from Liparoo in a north-easterly direction to Robinvale. This metadata briefly describes the contents of the data package. The user guide included in the package contains more detailed information about the individual datasets and available technical reports. The main components in the package are: AEM data and images derived from a holistic inversion of the RMC RESOLVE AEM survey; a composite digital elevation model (DEM); a range of interpreted data products designed to map key elements of the hydrogeological system and salinity hazards using the AEM dataset; and a series of ESRI ArcGIS map documents. The AEM data component consists of grids and images of modelled conductivity data derived from a holistic inversion of the RMC RESOLVE AEM survey. They include: layer conductivity grids below ground surface; depth slice grids representing the average conductivity of various regular depth intervals below ground surface; floodplain slice grids representing the average conductivity of various depth intervals relative to the elevation above or below a surface that approximates the River Murray floodplain; watertable slice grids representing the average conductivity of various intervals relative to the elevation above or below the regional watertable; and AEM cross sections of conductivity versus depth along each of the flight lines. The holistic inversion AEM data are derived from the 'River Murray Corridor RESOLVE AEM Survey, VIC & NSW, 2007 Final Data (P1141)', available as Geoscience Australia product number 67212 (GeoCat #67212). The DEM data component consists of a 10 metre horizontal resolution composite DEM for the River Murray Corridor AEM survey area derived from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) surveys, AEM surveys, and the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) survey. The interpreted data component is organised into product themes to address salinity and land management questions and to map key elements of the hydrogeological system and salinity hazards. An ArcGIS map document is included for each product theme. The products include: Blanchetown Clay; conductive soils; flush zones; groundwater conductivity; stratigraphic unit extents and reliability; near surface conductive zones; near surface resistive zones; Parilla Sands; Quaternary alluvium; recharge; salt store; surface salt; vegetation health; and Woorinen Formation. The RMC project was funded through the National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality with additional funding from the Lower Murray Catchment Management Authority (CMA), Mallee CMA, Goulburn-Murray Water and the Murray-Darling Basin Authority. The project was administered by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry through the Bureau of Rural Sciences, now known as the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES). Geoscience Australia (GA) were contracted to provide geophysical services to manage the AEM system selection and data acquisition, and to process and calibrate the AEM data. The AEM survey was flown by Fugro Airborne Geophysical Services in 2007 using the helicopter-borne RESOLVE frequency domain system. The Cooperative Research Centre for Landscape Environments and Mineral Exploration was sub-contracted through GA to manage the interpretation and reporting component of the RMC project.