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  • Dataset containing biostratigraphic data from wells in the Oway Basin.

  • The black and white 55 page fossils resource contains information about what fossils are, what parts of living things become fossilised and the most common fossil groups. The process of fossilisation and geological time are also covered. 24 informative illustrated fact sheets cover a wide variety of plant, animal and trace fossils. Includes student activities suitable for primary Years 3-6 and secondary Years 7-10.

  • The Tanami Region, which is the largest gold province in the Northern Territory, has produced 122 t of gold, has a known remaining resource of 190 t, and has high exploration potential. Most deposits are concentrated in three goldfields: Dead Bullock Soak (DBS), The Granites and Tanami. Significant mineralisation is also located at the Groundrush (0.7 Moz Au), Oberon (0.48 Moz Au) and Crusade (0.1 Moz Au) deposits, as well as the Coyote prospect in WA. Gold mineralisation is late in the tectonic cycle, has a spatial association with late orogenic felsic intrusives, and is closely related to late D5 structures.

  • This Record is a source document listing new zircon U-Pb isotopic ages measured for key rocks units in Australia's Northern Territory. The samples are critical reference points in the conduct of, and interpretations made by, the Regional Geoscience Program of the Northern Territory Geological Survey (NTGS) and the dating was conducted within the Geochronology group of AGSO-Geoscience Australia. The relationships between these ages, their regional significance, and the event chronologies they constrain will be discussed in other NTGS outlets and is not developed here. The source listing of ages is being made available early as a reference document, with brief details of the locations and geological context of each sample and comments on each age interpretation, as a service to all geoscientists and mineral explorers with interests in the geology of the Northern Territory. The analytical data are plotted on Concordia diagrams (see Figures) and are summarised in Appendix Tables A1- A43. These tables are not reproduced here, but are available from NTGS upon request.

  • This glossary has been written to compile a single reference for terms commonly used in regolith science, to bring consistency and uniformity to the terminology of regolith science, and to explain the way words have been used in the regolith literature

  • Mapping of outcrop geology on Laverton SH51-2 1:250 000 map sheet in the Eastern Goldfields, Western Australia, undertaken 1989-95 by Duggan MB, Williams PR, Jagodzinski EA, Rattenbury M, Champion D, Currie KL, Blake DH, Stewart AJ, Bastrakova I and J.Martyn and Associates, as part of the National Geoscience Mapping Accord (NGMA). Briefly, mapping consists of geological boundaries/units, faults, folds, veins, dykes, joints, linears, marker beds, trends, structural measurements, and mineral deposits.

  • Mapping of outcrop geology on Leonora SH5101 1:250 000 map sheet in the Eastern Goldfields, Western Australia, undertaken 1987-92 by Duggan MB, Oversby BS, and Williams PR, and 1998-99 by Stewart AJ and Liu SF as part of the National Geoscience Agreement (NGA). Briefly, mapping consists of geological boundaries/units, faults, folds, veins, dykes, joints, linears, marker beds, trends, structural measurements, and mineral deposits.

  • During the period 1984-1996, AGSO compiled and produced a series of Palaeogeographic atlases of Australia for the Phanerozoic Eon. The Atlases - Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Permian, Jurassic, and Cainozoic - contained maps which summarised the most important sedimentological data extracted from a wide variety of sources. Due to time and resource constraints four Periods (Devonian, Carboniferous, Triassic and Cretaceous) were not published, although data were compiled. Atlases consisted of a series of Data and Interpretation maps a Structure map, and supporting Stratigraphic Columns and text. Maps were compiled at a scale of 1:5 000 000. The PALAEOGEOGRAPHIC ATLAS OF AUSTRALIA dataset has resulted from the conversion of the CAD atlas maps from all ten atlases into a format compatible with GIS applications. Important CAD elements such as lithology patterns have been retained for visualisation purposes. It is envisaged that this Palaeogeographic dataset will become part of the AGCRC Australia's Geodynamic Framework project.

  • Nara Inlet in the Whitsunday Islands is a natural depocenter for clastic and carbonate sediment on the middle shelf of the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) platform. Three sediment cores were collected from the inlet to understand sediment accumulation in this tropical mixed clastic/carbonate system over time. Surface and subsurface sediment is comprised of two main components: terrigenous clay and shallow marine carbonate. Similar to other regions on the middle shelf of the GBR platform, the carbonate component, 25.80% by weight and dominated by Sr-poor foraminifera tests and mollusc shells, generally increases towards the surface. Radiocarbon ages derived from tests of benthic foraminifera indicate that the top 3 m of sediment accumulated within the last 3000 years, but that the rate has slowed toward present-day. The change in clastic and carbonate abundance therefore indicates a system where both clastic and carbonate accumulation has decreased over time, but where clastic accumulation has decreased faster. Reduced clastic accumulation may reflect progressive impedance of terrigenous input by a laterally growing fringing reef at the mouth of Nara Inlet. Likewise, reduced carbonate accumulation may reflect preferential reef growth and carbonate deposition outside of the inlet. Even though clastic accumulation has decreased significantly over time, the late Holocene mass, composition, and distribution of clastic material in Nara Inlet implies a terrigenous source previously unrecognized in models for the evolution of the GBR platform. Large amounts of terrigenous sediment probably were stored around topographic highs on the middle shelf during lowstand and early transgression. This clastic material was then removed over time, mixed with autochthonous carbonate, and deposited in embayments on the middle shelf. The accumulation of sediment on the middle shelf of a tropical mixed clastic/carbonate margin is not straightforward.

  • Time series of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) have been obtained from independent parallel VLBI networks NEOS-A and CORE-A using OCCAM 5.0 software. This paper presents the results and their detailed consideration. The EOP time series are approximated by linear functions so offset and rate of the differences NEOS - CORE canbe estimated. It appears that biases between two EOP systems are negligibly small in 1996-1997 years but are increasing in time.