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  • Part I. deals with Devonian coral faunas from the West Kimberleys, the East Kimberleys, and the Carnarvon Basin of Western Australia. Of the 30 species described and illustrated from the West Kimberley's, 22 are from the Pilbara Limestone, and of these fifteen are from the main (lower) part of the Limestone of Givetian age, but there are five from the Atrypa beds of Teichert which the Bureau of Mineral Resources equates with the upper part of the Pillara Limestone and which may be late Givetian or possibly Frasnian; one Disphyllurn occurs in Atrypa beds referred by Teichert to Oberdevonstufe (Frasnian). This Pillara Limestone fauna (lower and upper) is dominated by Disphyllum with Hexagonaria, Thamnopora, and Alveolites also important. The overlying Mount Pierre Group, of Frasnian (Oberdevonstufe I) and early Famennian (ll and III) age, and the Bugle Gap Limestone (IV), have a strikingly different fauna mostly of small slender solitary corals. A new genus of Rugosa, Catactotoechus, type, species C. irregularis sp. nov., is described and figured. The East Kimberley corals are the Upper Devonian Palaeosmlia contexta sp. novo and Syringopora patula Hinde. From the Carnarvon Basin only four species are known, all from the Gneudna Formation; the genera to which they belong are those dominant and characteristic in the Pillara Limestone of the West Kimberleys, and in upper Givetian and early Frasnian faunas elsewhere, so that the Gneudna Formation Is probably of this age; the lack of identical species between the Carnanon and Kimberley Basins may be due to differences of province rather than time. The Western Australian Givetian coral faunas contain no species in common with those of eastern Australia, and many of the genera characteristic in eastern Australia, such as Endophyllum,, Sanidophyllum, and Heliolitcs, are absent in Western Australia. Part II deals with fragmentary coral material from the Silurian limestone, near Kiandra, southern New South Wales, including Halysites brevicatenatus sp. nov.; only two species are identified with previously described Australian forms, but the age indicated is probably Wenlockian, possibly Ludlovian.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • The area shown in the accompanying geological sketch map, No. NT63/9, was surveyed in 1953. The mapping was carried out by using a grid marked out with improvised survey pegs at intervals of 100' along magnetic bearings N-S and E-W. The average error in this grid was quite small. The datum for the grid was chosen to coincide with that of the base line of the Coronation Hill plane table survey. Contours are based on levels obtained by aneroid barometer.

  • On the 4th November, 1954, the first report of eruptive activity at Bam Island was received at the Observatory, Rabaul. Mr. M.A. Reynolds was at that time engaged on an investigation at Tuluman Volcano, Manus Sub-district. As he had most of the field equipment with him the writer signalled a request to him to proceed to Bam to investigate this report. On the afternoon of the 5th it was learned that the Lorengau radio was out of operation and that Reynolds had not received the signal. The writer departed Rabaul at 0700 hours 6th November, 1954, and arrived at Wewak at 1200 hours. The m/v. "Ella" was made available and the writer departed Wewak at 0300 hours together with Cadet Patrol Officer R.G. Noble for Bam Island, arriving there at 1300 hours that day. The writer spent a little over a day on the island and returned to Wewak on the 9th November. The recent investigation revealed that the present activity consists of only mild explosions, ejecting well crystallised lava, which though incandescent when ejected was solid. Seismic activity only accompanied the actual exposions and was not premonitory.

  • On the 12th July the writer was informed by signal originated by the A.D.O. Baluan Island, that explosive activity had recommenced at the St. Andrew Strait vents. The writer departed Rabaul by air from Momote on the 14th July and arrived at Baluan per Administration work boat on the evening of the 15th July. En route to Momote on the evening of the 14th a brief aerial inspection was made of the active area. Two small craters were visible above sea level and some minor explosions originated from the western crater during this inspection. The writer spent one week in the area and departed Baluan on the 21st July. During this period, as no further explosive activity was manifest, two ground inspections were made of the western crater. The day after the writer departed Baluan mild activity (mainly effusive) recommenced at the eastern crater. The name Tuluman (Tuluman being the word for hot in the Manus language) has been proposed for this new volcano. The name embraces the whole of the structure, that is, the two small cones above sea level as well as the submarine portion of the structure. The two small structures above sea level are referred to as east and west Tuluman craters respectively.