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  • The area investigated is to the south west of the West Wallsend Extended Colliery near the township of Killingworth within Portion 34, Parish of Teralba, County Northumberland. Drilling was carried out for the Joint Coal Board as part of the programme of the proposed Barnsley Australasian Open Cut, to locate the Great Northern and Fassifern Seams which outcrop at the base of the hills. Five bores were sunk. Bores BMR 1 to 4 penetrated the Fassifern Seam.

  • Three widely separated scout holes totalling 566 feet of drilling were drilled to investigate the possibilities of open-cut mining sites on the Australasian Seam immediately to the west and south-west of West Wallsend, a suburb of the city of Newcastle. Only one hole intersected the Australasian Seam. This hole indicated that the seam was much banded and of inferior quality - below present open-cut coal standard. Analyses suggested that it may be possible to mine a section of coal 8 feet 7 inches thick excluding non-coal bands, and that this coal would have an ash content of about 29% and calorific value of 10,000 B.Th.U. per lb. after the exclusion of bands.

  • Geochemical anomalies in soils over zones of lead mineralization were studied, both in known mineralized areas and in areas of suspected mineralization. The anomalies were readily detected and outlined by using a dithizone technique on acid extracts of soil samples collected from grid systems. By assuming the principles of mechanical mixing of the mineralized rock with other material during soil formation, and of downhill migration of soils, the anomalies were correlated with the zones of their origin: the asymmetric anomalies discovered are typical of such conditions. Applied to areas of suspected mineralization the geochemical prospecting was responsible for the discovery of two new bands of lead mineralization and several large lead and copper anomalies. The method proved to be extremely useful for indicating the most favourable areas for more detailed prospecting such as diamond or churn drilling and geophysical methods.

  • During the 1952 field season a series of test traverses using magnetic and self-potential methods was carried out over the known radio-active deposits in the Rum Jungle area, to discover whether any definite anomalies were associated with surface showings of radio-active minerals. In the course of the magnetic work in Brown's area, a major magnetic anomaly was discovered south-west of the workings, and a reconnaissance magnetic survey was carried out in order to obtain information on its extent. [Technical details and the preliminary results of the survey are discussed in this report].

  • The Hundred of Waterhouse, the north-eastern portion of which has been mapped, extends southward from the Hundred of Goyder. Mapping was carried out on air photos at a scale of 4" = 1 mile, and the information was transferred to a mosaic at a scale of 2" = 1 mile. In the following notes are discussed the general geology of the area, the relationship between the formations mapped and the ore-bearing formations at Rum Jungle, the structural geology of the area, and a uranium prospect which was discovered in the course of the regional mapping. Some recommendations for future geological mapping and prospecting are appended.

  • The Tennyson Uranium prospects, six in number and referred to as prospects 1 to 6, include 15 deposits all apparently too small and too low in grade, at the surface, to be worth working. Five of them (1A, 1F, 2A, 3, and 5) could be expected to yield 9, 25, 8, 15, and 5 to 18 tons of ore per foot of depth. Assay results are available for prospect 2 only. The estimated average grade of the surface material in deposits 2A and 2C, down to a depth of approximately 3 inches, is 0.21 and 0.13 per cent U3O8 respectively. However, the near surface material may be impoverished by leaching, and the grade may improve at depth. The country is hard, and the width of the orebody ranges from 10 inches in deposit 1F to 16 inches, and possibly 52 inches, in deposit 5. Drilling of a typical deposit should establish the type of mineralization, and indicate the change in grade of ore that might be expected below the surface. It is recommended that any drilling undertaken by the Bureau should be on a deposit, discovered by a Bureau party, 1.25 miles south-east of Tennyson's No. 1 prospect. In any case, the commencement of drilling in the Edith River area should be deferred until after inspection of some, at least, of any anomalies indicated by the proposed air-borne survey of 1953.

  • The Copper Mine Creek deposit is the only manganese deposit worthy of attention in the Ravensthorpe area. It is a bedded deposit enriched by supergene water, and has an estimated tonnage of 6,000 tons per vertical foot. The ore is in a number of beds interspersed with an approximate equal footage of decomposed schist. Two shafts indicate ore down to 40 feet, and it is thought that it may continue well below that level.

  • A reconnaissance survey of the eastern half of the Canberra 4-mile sheet was made during the period January - February 1952. The area mapped may be arbitrarily divided into two sections: the western section includes the eastern halves of the Canberra, Michelago, and Bredbo 1-mile sheets, and the eastern section comprises four 1-mile sheets - Lake Bathurst, Braidwood, Araluen and Bendethera. Belts of strongly folded Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian strata, with associated elongate masses of granite rocks, were encountered; they trend gradually northwards. Graptolites collected from Ordovician strata provide means to date these rocks accurately, and further study of the corals collected from Silurian limestones will similarly permit precise dating. Three fossil localities were found in the Devonian strata, but the brachiopods collected, although well-preserved and representative of many genera, do not permit precise stratigraphical placing without more intensive examination. Outcrops are generally very good in all parts except the Lake Bathurst area, where an extensive cover of Tertiary and later deposits obscures the Palaeozoic rocks.

  • The area described in the report lies between latitudes 12°48' and 12°56' S., and longitudes 130°56' and 131°11'E. Most of the mapped region lies between the Stuart Highway and the North Australian Railway. The investigation of this area is still in the early stages and has consisted of general geological mapping, and detailed investigation (including drilling) of areas found to have been radioactive during airborne scintillometer surveys carried out in 1952. At Brodribb and Ella Creek superficial hematite-rich deposits have been found to be radioactive to the extent of up to ten times background, but drilling of this type of deposit at Brodribb has not yet proved the existence of payable primary ore. Further drilling is proceeding. A new discovery at Ella Creek in July this year gave high radioactivity over a length of about 300 ft. and two pits sunk to a depth of 3 ft. of this line have shown counts of 5,000 per minute and 10,000 per minute respectively. The field geologists recommend further testing here. In the Frazer area, laterite, which contains a belt of radioactivity up to eight times background, is known to exist, but, apart from limited trenching, has not yet been adequately tested.

  • Since 1949 a considerable amount of geological and geophysical investigation as well as diamond drilling and some underground development has been undertaken in the search for uranium ore in the Darwin-Katherine region, and in the course of this work information has been gained which, it is thought, may be of interest to prospectors and companies who are now beginning to pay considerable attention to the possibilities of the area, but have had little or no experience of prospecting for uranium in the Katherine-Darwin region. Investigations of the area by the Bureau, by private companies, and by prospectors [are] now proceeding more vigorously than ever, and without doubt a good deal more remains to be found out concerning the uranium deposits of this province. In these circumstances the notes supplied below are put forward tentatively as being some facts known to the present writer at this time (July, 1953) as well as some more controversial opinions. It is expected that more information will be made available as the investigation proceeds. (The following notes should be read in conjunction with Pamphlet No. 3 (Radioactive Mineral Deposits) of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics and a copy of the Mineral Map (NT32B-4) would greatly aid in their understanding).