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  • The period 17th June to 3rd July, 1953, was spent by the writer on the uranium fields. During this time an inspection was made of all work being carried out by the Bureau; in addition, the investigations by Territory Enterprise Limited at Rum Jungle were shown to the writer by W. Thomas, Resident Geologist.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • The prospect covers an area originally enclosing three first order and one second order anomaly located by the Airborne Scintillometer Survey if 1952. Preliminary ground investigation was carried out in October 1952 and is contained in 'Preliminary Report on Airborne Scintillometer Surveys by N.H. Fisher and J. Sleiss'. Carborne equipment was first used to locate the anomalies and determine their extent in July, 1953. An Auster aircraft carrying a Halross scintillometer also flew over the area at the same time locating a high only near the first zone. This was carried out by the Territory Enterprise Limited. A survey grid was laid down to serve both the geological and geophysical work. The base line runs north-south for 3,300 feet and traverse lines run across it at 100 ft. intervals. The detailed radioactive survey covered the whole area. Traverse lines were read at 300 foot intervals in the outer sections where closer work was not warranted. The work commenced in August and was completed in October 1953.

  • This glossary gives a brief description of the more important sedimentary rocks. Composition percentages are tentative in nearly all cases. The terms listed are classified as follows.

  • White's South prospect is situated on the southern bank of the Finniss River (East branch) about 400 feet south southwest of White's Deposit (Ward 1953). Rocks do not outcrop in the area, but low radioactive anomalies were located in this area by the Geophysical Section 1951 suggesting that the western continuation of White's Deposit after faulting might be beneath the soil cover. Low grade ore intersections were obtained in five diamond drill holes put down in the area in 1952. A plan of the area on a scale of 40 feet to 1 inch accompanies this report (Plate 1).

  • This report deals with the results of 22,355 ft. of scout boring over an area of approximately 50 square miles on the western flank of the Muswellbrook (N.S.W.) Anticline. A traverse of overlapping bore-holes, located between the outcrops of the Upper Marine Series (Mulbring Beds) in the east and of the Triassic sediments in the west; provided a more complete section of the Upper Coal Measures in this area than has been previously available. Some 46 coal seams were encountered and tentatively numbered for correlation. Some of the coal seams exhibit very good qualities, but none could be classed as a good gas or coking coal. Igneous intrusions are numerous and of a fairly wide vertical and areal extent; their influence on the associated coal seams is generally destructive. The results of the above boring may be regarded as a basis, for any detailed future underground and/or open-cut mining investigations. No attempt was made to estimate coal reserves of any kind.

  • Widespread use of radio-active tracer elements in medicine, and the increased interest in the search for radio-active minerals, have led to the development of a variety of instruments for the detection of ionising radiations, and their general use by scientists who may have had no training in physics or electronics. While these instruments present a great diversity in appearance, the functioning depends on general principles which apply to all such equipment. The aim of these notes is to present these general principles in a simple form. For details of design, which are often highly complex, and require great skill and experience, reference should be made to the works listed in the bibliography.

  • During 1951 three separate sets of La Cour pattern Quartz Horizontal Magnetometers were received from the Danish Meteorological Institute. These instruments which are only semi-absolute, were calibrated at the Rude Skov Magnetic Observatory against the standard adopted by that observatory. As the Australian observatories are based on the International Magnetic Standard housed at Cheltenham near Washington, U.S.A. (hereinafter referred to as I.M.S.) it was decided to compare them against the Toolangi magnetometer as soon as possible after their arrival in Australia. Moreover, as the stability of these instruments depends on the torsion properties of a quartz fibre and on the magnetic moment of a magnet, regular comparisons should be made with an absolute magnetometer and the results used to control drift that might occur. The comparisons made immediately after the arrival of the instruments in Australia would thus constitute a starting point in the future control of the Q.H.Ms. [An account is given of work done between 1951 and 1952. Results are appended.]