From 1 - 10 / 386
  • A multicomponent seismic survey using an IVI MiniVib as a source was carried out to assist in mapping of fracture porosity in shear zones in areas of dryland salinity for the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (UNSW). The survey obtained a set of three dimensional, three component data at two sites near Spicers Creek, some 45km east of Dubbo. The acquisition was undertaken by Australian National Seismic Imaging Resource (ANSIR) from the 5th to the 12th April 2003 with the assistance of staff from UNSW. The objectives of this seismic survey are: 1. Develop quantitative measure of azimuthal anisotropy of P- and S-waves using refracted head wave amplitudes. 2. Determine the relative effects of lithological fabric and fracture porosity on P- and S-wave anisotropy factors. 3. Determine quantitative relationships between azimuthal anisotropy and fracture porosity. 4. Measure the horizontal and vertical variability of the fracture porosity in the fracture zones which control the discharge of saline groundwater and the occurrence of dryland salinity at the three experimental sites in the Spicers Creek Catchment. 5. Develop cost-effect field techniques for 3D - 3C (three dimensional - three component) shallow seismic refraction surveys for geotechnical, environmental and groundwater applications. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 36 South Australian coastal waterways. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Most of the 36 coastal waterways have a "Modified" environmental condition (as opposed to "Near Pristine"), according to the National Land and Water Resources Audit definition.

  • Bushfires ravaged around two-thirds of the Australian Capital Territory in January 2003. A firestorm on 18 January completely destroyed nearly 400 homes in Canberra. This Landsat 7 satellite image, acquired on 26 January 2003, shows burn scars caused by the bushfires. Land cover in this image is shown in pseudo-natural colour: active fire fronts appear as irregular, bright red lines in the south and south-west; burnt areas appear as dark red-brown; bushfire smoke appears as pale blue and healthy vegetation appears as green.

  • The OzEstuaries online GIS contains data for Australian estuaries (coastal waterways) and for oceans in the Australian region. Estuaries data include geomorphic habitat mapping, estuary condition, colour composite images (Landsat, MODIS and Quickbird satellite imagery and aerial photography), benthic classifications (from Landsat satellite imagery), bathymetry and population centres. Oceanic data include dissolved organic matter, chlorophyll concentration, suspended solids concentration and sea surface temperature (using MODIS satellite imagery) and bathymetry. The GIS provides facilities to search for and zoom to estuaries, integrate mapping and imagery datasets, and retrieve statistical information from the OzEstuaries database; allowing users to view spatial and statistical information. The oceanic imagery provides a regional context for coastal waterways. The GIS is part of Geoscience Australia's contribution to the Cooperative Research Centre for Coastal Zone, Estuary and Waterway Management (Coastal CRC). The geomorphic habitat mapping was conducted by Geoscience Australia for the National Land and Water Resources Audit, and is also part of Geoscience Australia's contribution to the Coastal CRC.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 73 Tasmanian coastal waterways. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. The majority of near pristine estuaries in Tasmania are located in the south and west of the State and on Cape Barren Island, according to the Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment.

  • Survey conducted by the Commonwealth Government or State/Territory Geological Survey (or equivalent) collecting airborne geophysical data

  • Lithostratigraphy, grain sizes and down-hole logs of Site 1166 on the continental shelf, and Site 1167 on the upper slope, are analyzed to reconstruct glacial processes in eastern Prydz Bay and the development of the Prydz trough-mouth fan. In eastern Prydz Bay upper Pliocene-lower Pleistocene glaciomarine sediments occur interbedded with open-marine muds and grade upward into waterlaid tills and subglacial tills. Lower Pleistocene sediments of the trough-mouth fan consist of coarse-grained debrites interbedded with bottom-current deposits and hemipelagic muds, indicating repeated advances and retreats of the Lambert Glacier-Amery Ice Shelf system with respect to the shelf break. Systematic fluctuations in lithofacies and down-hole logs characterize the upper Pliocene-lower Pleistocene transition at Sites 1166 and 1167 and indicate that an ice stream advanced and retreated within the Prydz Channel until the mid Pleistocene. The record from Site 1167 shows that the grounding line of the Lambert Glacier did not extend to the shelf break after 0.78 Ma. Published ice-rafted debris records in the Southern Ocean show peak abundances in the Pliocene and the early Pleistocene, suggesting a link between the nature of the glacial drainage system as recorded by the trough-mouth fans and increased delivery of ice-rafted debris to the Southern Ocean.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 131 New South Wales coastal waterways. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Most of the estuaries of New South Wales are under intense land use pressure with approximately 80% of the State's population living near an estuary (NSW Dept of Land and Water Conservation) .

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 52 Victorian coastal waterways. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Most of the 52 coastal waterways have a "Modified" environmental condition (as opposed to "Near Pristine"), according to the National Land and Water Resources Audit definition.

  • This paper was presented at the Specialist Group in Structural Geology & Tectonics field meeting, Kalbarri, Western Australia, September, 2003