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  • The core sample of grey marl was collected from the No. 2 Bore, Parish of Glencoe South, and came from the depth of 110-125 feet. The results of a micropalaeontological examination of the sample are described in this report. The species of foraminifera recognised in the sample are listed.

  • The area investigated, now commonly known as the Daly River Area, is situated on the north-eastern bank of the river, about 35 miles from the river mouth, and approximately 80 miles south of Darwin. The present survey was made in July 1950, in conjunction with work being done by the Bureau at Rum Jungle, and was a general investigation for possible radioactivity in the district. Although no radioactivity of interest was detected, it is considered desirable that the results of the investigation should be recorded. The geology of the area, field work, and results are described in this report.

  • During May, 1950, a sample of granitic material was obtained from a dump on the Sunnyside goldfield, and showing a few flakes of a green mineral similar in appearance to torbernite, was forwarded to the Department of Mines, Melbourne, by a miner working on that field. The Mines department tested the mineral and proved that it was uranium-bearing, and submitted a sample to the Bureau to test for radioactivity. After confirmation of the presence of radioactivity in the sample by laboratory tests, a brief visit was paid to the field by a party from the Geophysical Section. One day was spent for conducting tests on the field. The opportunity was taken of visiting the Maude and Yellow Girl mine, and testing ores and concentrates for radioactivity.

  • The request for a geophysical survey was made by Renison Associated Tin Mines N.L. through the Director of the Tasmanian Mines Department. The purpose of the survey was to explore for additional ore-bodies within an area of interest, occupying approximately 9.5 square miles. The present work was confined to an area near the Renison Bell main lode and situated on the northern slope of the Renison Bell Hill. Its purpose was to test the magnetic and self-potential methods over known ore-bodies and to apply these methods in the search for further bodies in the immediate vicinity.

  • In the vicinity of Roma about 3000-4000ft. of Mesozoic sediments overlie a basement consisting or granite and -metamorphic rocks. Permian rocks outcrop about 70 miles to the north of Roma. Considerable flows of natural gas, and small quantities of oil, have been found since 1900 in many of the bores which have been drilled in the Roma area; but no major commercial supplies have been developed. The sediments are mostly obscured by soil. Experience also suggests that pitting and shallow core drilling have limited value. It is therefore difficult, using normal geological methods, to determine geological structures in the region and to work out, except in the broadest way, the geological structure in the areas tested by drilling. In the present survey, gravity and magnetic methods were applied in an attempt to gain some indications of basement topography, which might be related to possible oil-bearing structures. It was found that the major geophysical anomalies are not related to known basement topography, but are probably due to variations of rock-types within the basement or other causes. However, it was possible to isolate some- gravity anomalies which might be related to high basement features. These anomalies are being tested by seismic methods to locate possible drilling targets.

  • The writer, accompanied by Mr. W.L. Hawthorne of the Geological Survey of Queensland, visited Longreach between 6th to 16th July, 1950, to inspect an area embracing Oakley, Cleeve and Kelso Stations, 8 to 14 miles north-east and east of Longreach. The purpose of the inspection was to re-examine the area previously mapped by Oil Search Ltd., and, if at all feasible, to recommend sites for deep drilling or scout drilling. In all an area of about 18 square miles was examined in sufficient detail to confirm Foster's mapping and to indicate that surface mapping could have little but negative value. The general geology of the area and previous investigations are described. An account is given of the present field investigation, and its results, together with recommendations for future work.

  • The island of Timor has attracted the attention of geologists for more than one hundred years. The first geological investigations were carried out on behalf of the Government of the Netherlands East Indies as early as 1829. This report has been compiled using information obtained during previous geological investigations, and the data supplied in existing geological reports, and comprises notes on the stratigraphy and structure of the island, with reference to oil prospects.

  • Following a report by Mr. McDougall of the existence of sulphur deposits, possibly of large dimensions, on New Britain, deposits at Lolobau, Pangalu and Kasolali were examined in the early part of June, 1950, by the Chief Geologist, accompanied by A.K.M. Edwards, Senior Geologist, Port Moresby and G.A. Taylor, Vulcanologist, Rabaul. This report gives an account of the examination and its findings.

  • The primary aim of the investigation was to determine the reserves and distribution of monazite in the deposits of heavy mineral sands along the East Coast. These deposits contain most of the known world reserves of zircon and rutile for which they are being exploited at various localities, mainly from North Stradbroke Island in Queensland to Ballina in New South Wales. Monazite forms little more than 0.5 per cent of the mixed concentrates, but can be recovered as a by-product from the separation of the other minerals. The monazite forms a source of supply of cerium and also of thorium. The thorium content of the monazite is determined on the basis of its radioactivity. This report gives an account of the field and laboratory work carried out. The results of the laboratory work, which included the separation and examination of minerals, the radiometric determination of quantities of monazite, and the investigation of the thoria content of monazite, are described in this report.

  • This report comprises descriptions of certain rocks collected by Dr. H.G. Raggatt in the Torquay - Airey's Inlet area, Victoria. The rocks are isolated specimens and no general conclusions applicable to the group as a whole have been drawn.