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  • The Seamounts, Canyons and Reefs of the Coral Sea bathymetry survey was acquired by Geoscience Australia onboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute (SOI) RV Falkor from the 2nd to the 30th of August 2020 using a Simrad EM302 and EM710 sonar systems. On research cruise FK200802/GA0365 a suite of advanced marine technology was employed – including unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), and remotely operated vehicles (ROV) – to collect and analyze geological and biological data of the outer, deep-water edge of the Great Barrier Reef and platform reefs in the adjacent Coral Sea Marine Park. R/VFalkor’s multibeam systems were used to map the structure of the reefs, canyons, and seamounts, illuminating their formative processes. In parallel, ROV SuBastian collected samples, sediment cores, and high-resolution imagery of the deep canyons and reefs that extend down to 2,500m. ROV SuBastian was also employed to image plankton through the water column, this activity led by JAMSTEC. Seabed environments in approximately 60 - 150 m depth were imaged using the advance camera system on the University of Sydney’s AUV Sirius. The datasets acquired will greatly improve understanding of the sedimentary processes that influence biodiversity patterns, including how canyons and platform reefs may provide a pathway for sediment to travel from coastal and shelf water to deep filter feeders. The deep and irregular canyon and platform-reef topography likely leads to direct upwelling of nutrient-rich deep waters. ROV SuBastian’s sensors were used to track water mass changes, with the aim of helping to identify the impact of upwelling of cooler waters on seabed and plankton communities. This V1 dataset contains two 64m resolution 32-bit geotiff of the Seamounts, Canyons and Reefs of the Coral Sea survey area produced from the processed EM302 and EM710 bathymetry data. This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • Wetlands provide a wide range of ecosystem services including improving water quality, carbon sequestration, as well as providing habitat for fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds. Managing wetlands in Australia is challenging due to competing pressures for water availability and highly variable climatic settings. The Wetlands Insight Tool (QLD) has been developed to provide catchment managers, environmental water holders, and wetlands scientists a consistent historical baseline of wetlands dynamics from 1987 onwards. The Wetlands Insight Tool (QLD) is available online through the Queensland Government Wetland What this product offers The Wetlands Insight Tool (QLD) summarises how the amount of water, green vegetation, dry vegetation and bare soil varies over time within each wetland. It provides the user with the ability to compare how the wetland is behaving now with how it has behaved in the past. This allows users to identify how changes in water availability have affected the wetland. It achieves this by presenting a combined view of Water Observations from Space, Tasseled Cap Wetness and Fractional Cover measurements from the Landsat series of satellites, summarised as a stacked line plot to show how that wetland has changed over time.

  • <p>This package contains Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM) data from the “SkyTEM helicopter EM Ord-Keep rivers region” survey which was flown over the Ord-Keep Rivers Region, Western Australia/Northern Territory, Australia during May - June 2017. High resolution magnetics were also acquired during the flights. As shown in Figure 1, the area is located in the 1:250000 map sheets of SD52-14 (Cambridge Gulf), SD52-11 (Port Keats) and SD 52-15 (Auvergne) near the town of Kununurra. 8100 line km of TEM and magnetic data were acquired. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GDA94 MGA Zone 52. <p>The aim of the survey is to provide geophysical information to support investigations of the regional groundwater system and identify regional groundwater sources. It will provide data to allow for the modelling of the following at a reconnaissance scale: <p>a) trends in regolith thickness and variability <p>b) variations in bedrock conductivity <p>c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover <p>d) the groundwater resource potential of the region <p>e) palaeovalley systems known to exist in the region. <p>This report lists the SkyTEM system information and specifications relevant for this survey, and describes the processing carried out on the data. <p>Geoscience Australia commissioned the survey as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. The EFTF program is led by Geoscience Australia (GA), in collaboration with the Geological Surveys of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia, and is investigating the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources in northern Australia and South Australia. The EFTF is a four-year $100.5 million investment by the Australian Government in driving the next generation of resource discoveries in northern Australia, boosting economic development across this region (https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf).

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This NSW DMR, Discovery 2000 Area L,Gilgandra, NSW, 1999 (P743), radiometric line data, AWAGS levelled were acquired in 1999 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 31389 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance. To constrain long wavelengths in the data, an independent data set, the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne magnetic data, was used to control the base levels of the survey data. This survey data is essentially levelled to AWAGS.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.000833 degrees (approximately 90m) and shows potassium element concentration of the Cooper Basin East, Qld, 2008 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2008 by the Qld Government, and consisted of 216403 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.00048 degrees (approximately 50m).The data are in nanoTesla (or nT). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1999 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 31389 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance. The data has had a variable reduction to the pole applied to centre the magnetic anomaly over the magnetised body. The VRTP processing followed a differential reduction to pole calculation up to 5th order polynomial. Magnetic inclination and declination were derived from the IGRF-11 geomagnetic reference model using a data representative date and elevation representative of the survey.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.004 degrees (approximately 410m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Albany-Fraser Block (Collie, Pemberton), WA, 1980 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1980 by the WA Government, and consisted of 18835 line-kilometres of data at 1500m line spacing and 150m terrain clearance.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.00048 degrees (approximately 50m) and shows thorium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000 Area L,Gilgandra, NSW, 1999 in units of parts per million (or ppm). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1999 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 31389 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Cobar-Nymagee Part 2, NSW, 1999 (P742), radiometric line data, AWAGS levelled were acquired in 1999 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 31212 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance. To constrain long wavelengths in the data, an independent data set, the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne magnetic data, was used to control the base levels of the survey data. This survey data is essentially levelled to AWAGS.

  • Categories  

    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. These line dataset from the Cobar-Nymagee Part 2, NSW, 1999 survey were acquired in 1999 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 31212 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.