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  • <p>The Australian Stratigraphic Units Database (ASUD) is the national authority on stratigraphic names in Australia. It originated as the National Register of Stratigraphic Names in 1949. The register was originally set up to help geoscientists adhere to the then newly created Australian Code of Stratigraphic Nomenclature (Lenz, et al, 1996). All information was held in a card file system until 1979 when the database was first developed electronically. The database now records information on all Australian stratigraphic units and their usage in published literature. <p>The database contains about 17500 currently approved stratigraphic names and over 36000 variations, most of which are superseded, obsolete, or misspelt versions of the current names. This information is based on over 16000 published references. <p>The database is maintained by Geoscience Australia on behalf of the Australian Stratigraphy Commission, a standing committee of the Geological Society of Australia. <p>Procedures can be queried at: http://www.ga.gov.au/data-pubs/datastandards/stratigraphic-units? <p>Data can be queried and downloaded at the ASUD website at: https://asud.ga.gov.au/ <p>Email contact: mailto:stratnames@ga.gov.au

  • The MARine Sediment (MARS) database contains detailed information on seabed sediment characteristics for samples collected from Australia's marine jurisdiction, including the Australian Antarctic Territory. It is an important scientific resource that includes survey and sample information such as locations, water depths and sample descriptions. Data are also provided from quantitative analyses of the sediments, such as grain size, mud, sand, gravel and carbonate concentrations, mineralogy, age determinations, geochemical properties, and physical attributes for down-core samples including bulk density, p-wave velocity, porosity and magnetic susceptibility. Images and graphics are presented, where available. MARS currently holds >40,000 sample and sub-sample records, and approximately 200,000 records describing the characteristics of these samples. New data are being added as they become available. Please contact us at marine.sediments@ga.gov.au if you wish to contribute marine sediment data to the MARS database.

  • <p>This package contains Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM) data from the “SkyTEM helicopter EM Ord-Keep rivers region” survey which was flown over the Ord-Keep Rivers Region, Western Australia/Northern Territory, Australia during May - June 2017. High resolution magnetics were also acquired during the flights. As shown in Figure 1, the area is located in the 1:250000 map sheets of SD52-14 (Cambridge Gulf), SD52-11 (Port Keats) and SD 52-15 (Auvergne) near the town of Kununurra. 8100 line km of TEM and magnetic data were acquired. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GDA94 MGA Zone 52. <p>The aim of the survey is to provide geophysical information to support investigations of the regional groundwater system and identify regional groundwater sources. It will provide data to allow for the modelling of the following at a reconnaissance scale: <p>a) trends in regolith thickness and variability <p>b) variations in bedrock conductivity <p>c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover <p>d) the groundwater resource potential of the region <p>e) palaeovalley systems known to exist in the region. <p>This report lists the SkyTEM system information and specifications relevant for this survey, and describes the processing carried out on the data. <p>Geoscience Australia commissioned the survey as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. The EFTF program is led by Geoscience Australia (GA), in collaboration with the Geological Surveys of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia, and is investigating the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources in northern Australia and South Australia. The EFTF is a four-year $100.5 million investment by the Australian Government in driving the next generation of resource discoveries in northern Australia, boosting economic development across this region (https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf).

  • Total magnetic intensity data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic filed caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium, uranium and thorium. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium, uranium and thorium. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • A short film describing the development of a prototype application for the Oculus Rift DK2 headset, to visualise subsurface geoscience data in situ. Synopsis: Visualisation and Science Promotion team members Michael de Hoog and Bobby Cerini visited Lake George in southern New South Wales, to demonstrate how the Oculus Rift is used to integrate subsurface resources data in situ with views of the landscape. In the opening sequence, Michael and Bobby set off across the dry lake bed. Michael is wearing the Oculus Rift headset while Bobby carries a laptop, containing georeferenced data previously gathered by Geoscience Australia. The headset has a camera attached to capture the view and enable tracking of Michael's head movements. The video shows what Michael is seeing as he looks around. Different data layers are shown being switched on and off, as Michael gazes at different parts of the landscape. The data are overlaid on the precise location within the landscape in which they were collected, including seismic line, volumes, gravity, magnetic and borehole data. The view changes to show Michael at the lakeside, wearing the Oculus Rift headset and looking at the wider landscape. Again the subsurface data is shown. The geographical extent of the data gathered in this area is revealed with Michael's head movements. A voiceover accompanying the movie describes the processes used to make the film and to show what the headset wearer sees. Script: Bobby Cerini, Michael de Hoog Data visualisation, application development: Michael de Hoog Cinematography, editing, audio: Michael O'Rourke Titles: Kath Hagan

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium, uranium and thorium. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium, uranium and thorium. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • Video of the geo-heritage aspects of the rocks of Stornes Peninsula, Larsemann Hills