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  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.004 degrees (approximately 420m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Gympie, QLD, 1987 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1987 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 13720 line-kilometres of data at 1500m line spacing and 150m terrain clearance.

  • BMR became an official organization in March 1946with a personnel establishment of 55 positions, which included 24 geophysicists, 17 geologists, a mining engineer, and a petroleum technologist; a mineral economist was added in 1947. The functions laid down for the Bureau then have been generally accepted ever since; a copy of the formal statement of BMR's of unctions as recently restated by the Government is at Annex A.

  • Petroleum exploration carried out in the Gippsland Basin up to February 1976 has been reviewed to provide a current assessment of knowledge of the basin and to determine the need for further exploration. The Gippsland Basin is a Late Mesozoic to Cainozoic Basin located mainly offshore in the northeastern portion of Bass Strait, between the mainland of Australia and Tasmania. It is roughly triangular in shape, being narrowest onshore in Victoria to the northwest and broadening towards the edge of the continental slope to the southeast. It contains up to 4500 in of fluvio-deltaic and marine sediments, which have been subjected to faulting, drape folding and channel erosion. To date, the Gippsland Basin has been by far the most prolific petroleum producing basin in Australia, with initial reserves of more than 300 x 106 m3 of oil and 200 x 109 m3 of natural gas. The basin has been actively explored geophysically since the early 1960s and all of the larger and more obvious structures have been drilled. The basin still has some exploration potential at deeper levels than the main Eocene producing zones, but detailed seismic mapping of deeper horizons is difficult and requires the best seismic technology available. It seems likely that the greater part of the recoverable petroleum in the basin has already been found, but there is some potential for further discoveries.

  • AUSGeoid98 data files contain a 2 minute grid of AUSGeoid98 data covering the Australian region, which you can use to interpolate geoid-ellipsoid separations for the positions required.You can use your own interpolation software, or you can use Geoscience Australia's Windows Interpolation software (Winter). The data files are text files in a standard format that cover the same area as standard topographic map areas. Files covering both 1:250,000 (approximately 100 x 150 km) and 1:1,000,000 (approximately 400 x 600 km) map areas are available. There is a 4 minute overlap on all sides of each area. Data format: AUSGeoid98 data files have a header record at the start of each file, to distinguish them from the superseded AUSGeoid93 data files. AUSGeoid98 data files show the geoid-ellipsoid separation to 3 decimal places, while the superseded AUSGeoid93 data files showed only 2 decimal places. AUSGeoid98 deflections of the vertical were computed from the geoid-ellipsoid separation surface, while the AUSGeoid93 deflections of the vertical were computed from OSU91A.

  • The hydrocarbon potential of the Tithonian play in the Dampier Sub-basin has been rapidly assessed as part of a continuing program of quantitative appraisal of Australia's hydrocarbon potential. Six wells have already tested the play; of these Angel was a significant gas discovery and Egret was a significant oil discovery. The remaining potential in four undrilled prospects (Courtenay, Wallcot, Nickol, and Finucane) has been assessed by the prospect by prospect method, using a Monte Carlo simulation computer program called SIMULAT.

  • Woomera Bore 1 was drilled to a depth of 2,005 feet. Four formations were penetrated believed to be of Cambrian and/or Proterozoic age. The nature of these beds suggests that the area has no petroleum prospects. The age of the strata penetrated is uncertain, as no fossils have been observed. No results were obtained from a formation test carried out with the packer set at 1,445 feet.

  • Kaufana No. 1 Bore was drilled to a depth of 3,380 feet. Thin Pliocene calcareous greywacke unconformably overlies Miocene "f-3" siltstone; this in turn disconformably overlies Miocene "fl-2" siltstone, shale, and greywacke. The Miocene "f-3" Bokama Limestone was not encountered, but may have been represented by a stratigraphic equivalent with a different lithology. No shows of hydrocarbons were observed.

  • The completion report of A.A.O. No. 8, (Karumba) has been wrttten by A.C.M. Laing* and contributions on Petrology by N.C. Stevens,*** Micropalaeontology by I. Crespin,** and Electrical Logging by D.F. Dyson** are appended. The report is one of a series of reports published on bores subsidized under the Petroleum Search Subsidy Act, 1957-58. The hole was put down to determine the stratigraphical sequence of the south-eastern part of the Carpentaria Basin, an extension of the Great Artesian Basin, and to evaluate the significance of a gravity high. The significance of the bore is that the stratigraphical sequence of the area and the depth of hasement are now actually known from drilling evidence. It is the third test bore recently drilled in the Gulf of Carpentaria, on geophysical indications. The other two are Wyaaba No. 1 (Frome-Broken Hill Co. pty Ltd), and Weipa No. 1 (Zinc Corporation Ltd). The stratigraphy encountered in these bores is shown on the correlation chart, Plate 2. A composite well log of A.A.O. No. 8 is attached (Plate I). It is surprising to note from the log that no separate tests were made of the intervals 760-900 feet and 1540-1630 feet. The electrical log for both intervals suggests possibilities of oil, gas, or salt water; a small gas show was actually observed at 1595 feet. * Mines Administration Pty Ltd, Brisbane. ** Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra. *** University of Queensland.

  • AUSGeoid98 data files contain a 2 minute grid of AUSGeoid98 data covering the Australian region, which you can use to interpolate geoid-ellipsoid separations for the positions required.You can use your own interpolation software, or you can use Geoscience Australia's Windows Interpolation software (Winter). The data files are text files in a standard format that cover the same area as standard topographic map areas. Files covering both 1:250,000 (approximately 100 x 150 km) and 1:1,000,000 (approximately 400 x 600 km) map areas are available. There is a 4 minute overlap on all sides of each area. Data format: AUSGeoid98 data files have a header record at the start of each file, to distinguish them from the superseded AUSGeoid93 data files. AUSGeoid98 data files show the geoid-ellipsoid separation to 3 decimal places, while the superseded AUSGeoid93 data files showed only 2 decimal places. AUSGeoid98 deflections of the vertical were computed from the geoid-ellipsoid separation surface, while the AUSGeoid93 deflections of the vertical were computed from OSU91A.

  • The rig and ancillary gear were shipped by the 300-ton landing barge "Wewak" from Kaufana, Papua, to Wilson Island, a distance of approximately 1,000 miles. They were thence transferred to Wreck Island by the drilling company's landing barge "Tamona" of 47.38 registered tonnage. All stores, supplies, and fresh water were transported 58 miles from Gladstone by the "Tamona". Communications were maintained by an A.W.A. 5A Transceiver with OTC Station VIR Rockhampton. The bore was spudded in at 1400 hours, 7th May, 1959. 12-1/4 inch hole was drilled to 493 feet. Owing to lost circulation, no cuttings could be recovered from the hole, and a laborious system of bailing was resorted to. The 12-1/4 inch pilot hole was opened to 17-1/2 inches, and 13-3/8 inch J55x54.5 lb. STC casing was run to 480 feet. 12-1/4 inch hole was drilled to 1,170 feet, but owing to porous unconsolidated sediments and lost circulation in higher zones it was decided to run and cement 9-5/8 inch J55x40 lb. STC casing at 1,110 feet. 8-1/2 inch hole was then drilled to total depth, 1,898 feet. Recent, Pleistocene, Pliocene, and Miocene sediments were penetrated; basement was encountered at 1,795 feet. Fourteen cores were cut during the drilling of the bore, using a 20-foot Reed K500 "Kor-King" barrel. Both hard and soft formation 5-5/8 inch core heads were used. The hole was logged to total depth with a Failing Logmaster, giving the self-potential, 16 and 63 inch normal and single point resistivity, and gamma ray curves. No shows of oil or gas were noted, and in consequence no drill stem tests were carried out. Three deviation surveys were made; the maximum deviation was 1/2 degree at 1,580 feet. The bore was abandoned as a dry hole by placing cement plugs from 1,160 to 1,060 feet and from 50 feet to surface; a metal name plate affixed to a projecting pipe was welded on to the cap sealing the bore.