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  • This polygon dataset contains the sedimentary basins of Australia ranked by their CO2 storage potential. See the National Carbon Mapping and Infrastructure Plan Australia report for details.

  • This polygon dataset contains the sedimentary basins of Australia ranked by their CO2 storage potential. See the National Carbon Mapping and Infrastructure Plan Australia report for details.

  • The paper presents the application of the European Macroseismic Scale - 1998 (EMS-98) in assessing vulnerability of the building stock in the Asia-Pacific region. Two case study areas have been selected for the purpose, i.e., Muzaffarabad (Pakistan) and Padang (Indonesia) which experienced severe earthquake shaking in 2005 and 2009 respectively. Typical building types in these areas are defined and compared to the standard construction types of the EMS-98. The inventory of 750 buildings in Muzaffarabad was obtained from a field survey carried out after the 2005 Kashmir earthquake that struck the city and its hinterland, and subsequently updated in 2007 after conducting more surveys. The surveys documented the key building features so that the primary parameters affecting vulnerability and typical failure mechanisms could be identified. Additionally, about 520 buildings were surveyed in several other cities of Pakistan. The inventory of 4,000 buildings in Padang was acquired from the 2009 Padang Region Damage Survey undertaken following the 2009 West Sumatra Earthquake which was supported by the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction. During the survey, the building stock in Padang was classified into a schema consisting of 54 types and observed damages were categorised into 9 severities. An effort was made to map the building stock and observed damages from the survey outcomes to EMS-98 definitions. This paper highlights the flexibility and robustness that EMS-98 offers for use outside of the European region and describes the limitations and possible improvements in the current version of the scale for global application. These include the addition of new building types (e.g., dhajji, high-set timber construction, low-set timber construction and brick veneer), inclusion of a very high vulnerability class, consideration of building vintage and storey class in vulnerability assignment and damage description for wooden structures. Treatment of subjectivity and uncertainty are the key areas requiring more attention in making improvements in EMS-98 and making it a global scale.

  • Tsunamis pose considerable risk to coastal communities around the globe and understanding this risk is a key aspect of emergency management and risk reduction. This paper explores the nature and extent of tsunami hazard to NSW coastal communities and informs tsunami emergency planning and management. We outline the results of recent risk scoping which have examined sources of tsunami hazard, and tsunami history together with results of inundation studies for selected sites and discuss the level of tsunami risk to these NSW communities. We also outline how the results have complimented research by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in confirming tsunami warning thresholds for NSW. Work undertaken to date indicates the coast of NSW has a moderate tsunami hazard level. Whilst historical impact of tsunami inundation in NSW has been relatively minor, and generally restricted to marine based events, the modelling of selected earthquake generated events indicates the potential for land inundation particularly at high (rare) return periods. Low lying populated communities around estuary foreshores are particularly at risk although results also indicate the potential for inundation of open coast sites at very high (very rare) return periods. The results confirm the need for and support the ongoing collaborative development of emergency management arrangements for tsunami.

  • This dataset contains topographic slope data (in degree) from seabed mapping surveys on the Van Diemen Rise in the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf of the Timor Sea. The survey was conducted under a Memorandum of Understanding between Geoscience Australia (GA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in two consecutive years 2009 (GA survey number GA-0322 and AIMS survey number SOL4934) and 2010 (GA survey number GA-0325 and AIMS survey number SOL5117). The surveys obtained detailed geological (sedimentological, geochemical, geophysical) and biological data (macro-benthic and infaunal diversity, community structure) for the banks, channels and plains to investigate relationships between the physical environment and associated biota for biodiversity prediction. The surveys also provide Arafura-Timor Sea, and wider northern Australian marine region context for the benthic biodiversity of the Van Diemen Rise. Four study areas were investigated across the outer to inner shelf. Refer to the GA record 'Methodologies for seabed substrate characterisation using multibeam bathymetry, backscatter, and video data: A case study for the Eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, Northern Australia' for further information on processing techniques applied (GeoCat: 74092; GA Record: 2013/11).

  • Boundary of the Normanton Formation, Allaru Mudstone and Wallumbilla Formation in Cape York and offshore Carpentaria. Differentiation of Rolling Downs group within Cape York and extent of Normanton Formation within offshore Carpentaria Basin. Joins with boundaries of Rolling Downs Group included on Habermehl and Lau (1997). Data is available in Shapefile format This data set was used in: Figure 2.13 in Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) 'Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment'. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Figure 5.9 in Smerdon BD, Welsh WD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Carpentaria region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. REFERENCES Habermehl, M. A. and J. E. Lau (1997). Hydrogeology of the Great Artesian Basin Australia (Map at scale 1:2,500,000). Canberra, Australian Geological Survey Organisation. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75840.

  • Polygons representing a qualitative estimate of the potential for hydraulic interconnection between the base of the Great Artesian Basin and top of underlying basement units. This dataset is derived from the 'Hydrogeological basement units in contact with the base of the Great Artesian Basin' dataset (Geoscience Australia, catalogue #75910, 2013) and 'Base Great Artesian Basin hydrogeological units in contact with basement' dataset (Geoscience Australia, catalogue #75911, 2013). It is used to identify potential hydraulic interconnection between the Great Artesian Basin and basement units. Data is available as polygons in Shapefile format This GIS data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and used in Figure 3.6 of Smerdon BD, Ransley TR, Radke BM and Kellett JR (2012) Water resource assessment for the Great Artesian Basin. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75839.

  • The revised Great Artesian Basin Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary was produced by the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment (GABWRA) . This boundary is modified from that of Habermehl and Lau 1997 and incorporates the revised boundary from the South Australia Great Artesian Basin (Eromanga Basin) Hydrogeological map 2012. Modifications made to sections of this boundary as part of the GABWRA include major revisions to the Surat and Clarence-Moreton Basins boundary; southern part of the Coonamble Embayment; NW Queensland boundary within the Lawn Hill and Westmoreland 1:250K map sheet areas. The dataset includes boundaries of basement inliers within the GAB Note: Habermehl and Lau 1997 boundary included Triassic GAB formations in Queensland which were not considered by the GABWRA. Data is available in polygon format. REFERENCE: Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75904.

  • Boundary defining the extent of the Paleogene and Neogene sequence overlying the Great Artesian Basin. Data is available in Shapefile format This data set was used in: Figures 3.2 and 5.9 of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Figure 3.3 of Smerdon BD, Ransley TR, Radke BM and Kellett JR (2012) Water resource assessment for the Great Artesian Basin. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75844.

  • Polygons representing a regional interpretation of the of the Jurassic-Cretaceous stratigraphic units at the base of the GAB, as hydrostratigraphic units. To be used in conjunction with dataset 'Hydrogeological basement units in contact with the base of the Great Artesian Basin' (Geoscience Australia dataset, Catalogue #75910) to represent areas of potential hydraulic interconnection between the Great Artesian Basin and basement hydrogeological units. Data is available in Shapefile format This GIS data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and used in: Figure 5.8 of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Figure 5.12 of Smerdon BD, Welsh WD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Carpentaria region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia, plus Figure 7 in the corresponding summary report. Figure 5.4 of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Central Eromanga region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia, plus Figure 7 in the corresponding summary report. Figure 5.7 of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Surat region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia, plus Figure 10 in the corresponding summary report. Figure 5.4 of Smerdon BD, Welsh WD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Western Eromanga region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia, plus Figure 8 in the corresponding summary report. Figure 3.6 of Smerdon BD, Ransley TR, Radke BM and Kellett JR (2012) Water resource assessment for the Great Artesian Basin. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia, plus Figure 4 in the corresponding summary report. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75911.