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  • Educational booklet series on the hazards of East New Britain, Papua New Guinea: tsunamis, earthquakes & volcanoes

  • This map shows the locations of mines operating at the end of 2012, developing mines and mineral deposits in Australia. Developing mines are deposits with a proven minable resource and where mines site development has commenced or where a decision to mine has been announced. Mineral deposits highlight areas of know mineralisation with a proven or probable resource, that are not currently being mined or developed. Closed mines or mines not operating at the end of 2012 are not shown.

  • Weathering, erosion and deposition are all around us. Without these processes we would not have our mountains, river valleys, sandy beaches or even the soil in which we grow our food. This booklet outlines the processes of weathering, erosion and deposition for the information of teachers and students. Includes case studies about the formation of many Australian landforms such as Uluru, the Warrumbungles and the Bungle Bungles. The 104 page booklet also includes student activities with answers. Suitable secondary teachers.

  • The NSW Continental Slopes survey GA-2413, SS10/2006 was acquired by Geoscience australia onboard the RV Southern Surveyor from the 12th of October to the 25th of October 2006. The geographical range stretched from Jervis bay in the South to Port Stephens in the North. The aim was to assess the physical nature of the NSW continental slope, improve our understanding of the surface and subsurface structure of the continental slope and to investigate the history of sediment movement along the continental slope.

  • The TOPAS Sea Trials survey GA-2361, was acquired by Geoscience Australia after the installation of the new Sub bottom profiler (TOPAS) onboard the RV Southern Surveyor during the 9th and the 10th of December 2004. The survey loacation was offshore Brisbane. The aim of the survey was to test the new sub bottom profiler installed onboard. The bathymetry grids consists of 5,10 and 40 resolution projected in Easting and Northing WGS84, UTM56S.

  • Identifying the influence of neotectonics on the morphology of elevated passive margins is complicated in that major morpho‐structural patterns might plausibly be explained by processes related to late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic rifting and/or differential erosion induced by Cenozoic epeirogenic uplift. The proportional contribution of each process can vary from continent to continent, and potentially even within the same passive margin. In the passive margin setting of the southeast Australian highlands the documented occurrence of neotectonic deformation is rare, and accordingly its role in landscape evolution is difficult to establish. The results of investigations within the Lapstone Structural Complex, which forms the eastern range front of the Blue Mountains Plateau, provide evidence for two periods of Cenozoic neotectonic uplift in this part of the highlands. The first, demonstrated by seismic and structural evidence, is suggested to have occurred in the Paleogene, and is thus unrelated to Cretaceous rifting. The second period, demonstrated by evidence from the Kurrajong Fault (presented herein) suggests that uplift occurred in both the Mio‐Pliocene and the Middle Pleistocene. The cumulative Neogene and younger uplift of ~15 m determined for the Kurrajong Fault is less than 10% of the 130 m of total measured throw across the fault. The apparently minor contribution of neotectonism to the current elevation of the Blue Mountains Plateau supports a predominantly erosional exhumation origin for the topographic relief at the plateau's eastern edge. This finding contrasts with evidence from fault complexes associated with similar topographic relief elsewhere in the south‐eastern highlands, indicating that present‐day topography cannot be directly related to relief generated by Neogene and younger uplift, even from relatively closely‐spaced (< 150 km) structures within the same passive margin. These findings have implications for understanding the spatio‐temporal variability of post‐rift faulting in continental passive margin settings and the evolution of landscapes therein.

  • ESRI Grids of available bathymetry within the bounds of proposed Marine Protected Areas in the Antarctic. Interpolated datasets are also included.

  • Gravity data measure small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Southern_Wiso_Basin_Gravity_CSCBA267GU.nc grid is a complete spherical cap Bouguer anomaly grid for the Southern Wiso Basin Gravity Survey, 2013 survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 201380 for the geological survey of NT. The grid has a cell size of 0.00742586 degrees (approximately 800m). A total of 3859 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Gravity data measure small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This North_Perth_Gingin_Brook_Gravity_CSCBA267GU_Geodetic_p201360.nc grid is a complete spherical cap Bouguer anomaly grid for the North Perth Gingin Brook Gravity Survey, 2013 survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 201360 for the geological survey of WA. The grid has a cell size of 0.00363308 degrees (approximately 370m). A total of 1253 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This North_Perth_Gingin_Brook_Gravity_CSCBA230GUVD_Geodetic_p201360.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the North Perth Gingin Brook Gravity Survey, 2013 survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 201360 for the geological survey of WA. The grid has a cell size of 0.00363308 degrees (approximately 370m). A total of 1253 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) process was applied to the original grid to calculate the first vertical derivative grid.