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  • During the period 19th November to 22nd November, 1952, severe earth tremors were felt in the Gunning District, and, less severely, over a considerable portion of south-eastern New South Wales. As officers of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra, the writers were detailed to investigate the tremors.

  • An enquiry has come from the Melbourne University Ore-Dressing Laboratory concerning the mineralogy of ores from Nos. 1 and 2 orebodies at Rye Park. Mr. K. S. Blaskett, Principal Research Officer at the Laboratory, has done treatment tests on ore from the No. 1 orebody, but is uncertain as to whether the sample investigated is typical of the ore as a whole. Sullivan and Dallwitz (1952) suggested that scheelite is more abundant than wolfram in the ore, but Mr. Blaskett found that the principal tungsten mineral is wolfram; evidence for this was obtained during ore treatment tests, and was confirmed by mineragraphic work. According to the geological report, fluorite is stated to be abundant, but very little fluorite was found in the ore treated in the Laboratory. As the bulk of the ore at Rye Park is in the No. 2 orebody, the question has arisen whether this ore is appreciably different from the sample tested. Differences in mineral association, grain-size, etc., may be very important in ore treatment. The following report describes in a general way what is known at present about the minerals and problems in which Mr. Blaskett is interested.

  • Uranium mineralisation was discovered in association with copper minerals at Rum Jungle in September 1949, and investigations carried out since that time, and which are still proceeding, have led to the discovery of additional occurrences, and have shown that the field is likely to prove an important one. The prospects are mainly uranium-copper deposits, but autunite deposits, which are poor in copper, also occur. In addition, radioactivity has been found in a bed of conglomerate over a length of 2.5 miles. No uranium minerals have yet been positively identified from the outcrop of this conglomerate, which shows no sign of sulphide mineralization. This paper presents a preliminary account of the geology and type of mineralization in the Rum Jungle area.

  • The fossils were collected by D.M. Traves, a member of a party of three Australian Geologists who visited Pakistan in 1951. Collections were made at the following localities: Darband Village, Sandhi Village, and Khaibar Village. A preliminary examination and report on the fossils has been made by Dr. M.H. Khan, Geologist of the Geological Survey of Pakistan. This report contains a description of these fossils and provides a comparison of the faunas found at these localities.

  • These notes deal with a brief experimental seismic survey undertaken by the Bureau of Mineral Resources for the Victoria Railways. The object of the survey was to determine whether the seismic refraction method was suitable for subsurface exploration in the area between Dynon and Footscray Roads, West Melbourne. The information desired by the Railways was concerned with the existence or otherwise of a "foundation" rock capable of supporting constructions associated with railway sidings and marshalling yards. Records of seismic refractions were obtained along three traverses.

  • In the various methods of geophysical prospecting, sensitive instruments are used on or near the surface of the earth to measure effects which arise from differences between the physical properties of rocks, ores and minerals. The analysis and interpretation of these measurements permit conclusions to be drawn concerning the sub-surface geology and the presence or absence of orebodies, coal seams, and the like, or of structures likely to be favourable to the occurrence of oil, etc. The principal physical properties of rocks which are useful in geophysical prospecting are density, elasticity, electrical conductivity, radio-conductivity and magnetic susceptibility. Aeromagnetic survey methods, their present use, and results of such surveys, are discussed in this report.

  • An area of about 12,000 square miles was mapped in the field seasons 1950-51. It contains four Pre-Cambrian rock groups ranging from Archaeozoic to Uppermost Proterozoic. The main groups in the area, the Mt. Isa and Lawn Hill Groups, are shallow-water geosynclinal sediments involved in a Proterozoic orogeny which resulted in fairly intensive folding along dominantly north-south axes, together with much faulting. The geological features discussed in this report include physiography, topography, stratigraphy, igneous activity, structure, mineral deposits and water supply.

  • During late 1951 and early 1952 the Bureau, while searching for open-cut coal in New South Wales, prospected the Big Ben and Donaldson's Seams in the Bloomfield Area which is 3.5 miles south of East Maitland. Drilling involving 21 holes and totalling about 2400 ft. revealed that although the actual coal of the seams was quite good in parts, the seams themselves were subject to marked bending, thinning, and splitting. This not only severely limits open-cut prospects to small areas but will make mining difficult. In the contiguous East Bloomfield, Stoney Pinch and Thornton Areas an additional 16 holes with a total footage of 2,250 feet were drilled and indicated that the seams were characterised by the same rapid variation and offer no better possibilities than the main Bloomfield Area. Operations, including mining, coal analyses, logging, and surveying are discussed. Bore logs and the results of coal sample analyses are appended to this report.

  • The writer spent the period May 31st to June 4th, 1952, with geological parties lead by K.A. Townley and J.F. Ivanac respectively in the Mt. Isa District, Queensland. At this time E.K. Carter had carried out one week's mapping in the south of Mt. Isa township, and had traced the Mt. Isa shale and dolomitic shale for about 12 miles south of the mine. He had shown that the Templeton granite was concordant and that it was younger in age than the Mt. Isa sediments. The writer, after considering the work carried out by E.K. Carter and a study of the photographs of the region and of the geology of Mt. Isa Mines, came to the conclusions listed herein. Observations and recommendations are discussed.

  • A total of 25 rotary cored holes were drilled by the Bureau in Portion 49, Parish of Wallarah, County Northumberland, 2 miles south of Swansea. Approximately 1400 ft. of "test and define" drilling proved a possible 200,000 tons of coal suitable to be open cut under an average overburden of 6/1 ratio. The initial drilling programme showed a rolling seam. After surveying, further holes were drilled to locate the displacement which is 10 to 15 ft. in the S.W. corner of the area. No other obstacles are known which would hinder immediate working of the area. The lower split of the Wallarah Seam was tested in three holes but was found to be too thin to warrant further prospecting. The geology of the area is discussed in this report, and the results of the drilling programme are shown in the accompanying graphic and bore logs.