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  • Wells Limestone, situated 8 miles from Canberra in A.C.T., is a lens of massive limestone in a formation largely consisting of shales of Silurian age. The gently undulating topography and the low relief of the area of outcrop itself do not provide an attractive quarry site, although the stone seems very suitable for use as aggregate. Soil interpretation from shallow bores indicate considerable extensions of the deposit beyond the outcrop. 'Indicated' and 'inferred' reserves of limestone [have] been calculated, although further proving of reserves should be done before it is decided to establish a crushing plant at the deposit.

  • A phenomenon, thought to be a possible "gas blow", occurring in the Sirunki - Laiagam area, 9 miles west-northwest of Wabag, Western Highlands, was investigated by the writer in August, 1952 after it had been reported to the Senior Geologist at Port Moresby by the Assistant District Officer stationed at Wabag. The writer was accompanied into the area by Patrol Officer T. Dwyer. Pace and compass and time and compass methods were used to record observations on the patrol. A geological reconnaissance map accompanies this report.

  • During the period 19th November to 22nd November, 1952, severe earth tremors were felt in the Gunning District, and, less severely, over a considerable portion of south-eastern New South Wales. As officers of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra, the writers were detailed to investigate the tremors.

  • Uranium mineralisation was discovered in association with copper minerals at Rum Jungle in September 1949, and investigations carried out since that time, and which are still proceeding, have led to the discovery of additional occurrences, and have shown that the field is likely to prove an important one. The prospects are mainly uranium-copper deposits, but autunite deposits, which are poor in copper, also occur. In addition, radioactivity has been found in a bed of conglomerate over a length of 2.5 miles. No uranium minerals have yet been positively identified from the outcrop of this conglomerate, which shows no sign of sulphide mineralization. This paper presents a preliminary account of the geology and type of mineralization in the Rum Jungle area.

  • The fossils were collected by D.M. Traves, a member of a party of three Australian Geologists who visited Pakistan in 1951. Collections were made at the following localities: Darband Village, Sandhi Village, and Khaibar Village. A preliminary examination and report on the fossils has been made by Dr. M.H. Khan, Geologist of the Geological Survey of Pakistan. This report contains a description of these fossils and provides a comparison of the faunas found at these localities.

  • These notes deal with a brief experimental seismic survey undertaken by the Bureau of Mineral Resources for the Victoria Railways. The object of the survey was to determine whether the seismic refraction method was suitable for subsurface exploration in the area between Dynon and Footscray Roads, West Melbourne. The information desired by the Railways was concerned with the existence or otherwise of a "foundation" rock capable of supporting constructions associated with railway sidings and marshalling yards. Records of seismic refractions were obtained along three traverses.

  • In the various methods of geophysical prospecting, sensitive instruments are used on or near the surface of the earth to measure effects which arise from differences between the physical properties of rocks, ores and minerals. The analysis and interpretation of these measurements permit conclusions to be drawn concerning the sub-surface geology and the presence or absence of orebodies, coal seams, and the like, or of structures likely to be favourable to the occurrence of oil, etc. The principal physical properties of rocks which are useful in geophysical prospecting are density, elasticity, electrical conductivity, radio-conductivity and magnetic susceptibility. Aeromagnetic survey methods, their present use, and results of such surveys, are discussed in this report.

  • A total of 22 "testing and defining" rotary cored drill holes were drilled by the Bureau and J. McD. Royle Ltd., contractor to the Bureau, during the prospecting for reserves of open-cut coal in the Tomago Stage of the Upper Coal Measures near Buchanan. These 22 holes involved 3640 ft. of drilling and indicated possible reserves of 4,200,000 tons of coal suitable for mining by underground and open cut methods. The geology of the area, and the operations carried out, including mining, logging, sampling, analysis, and surveying, are discussed. The results of the drilling programme are shown in the accompanying maps, and graphic and bore logs.

  • The writer spent the period May 31st to June 4th, 1952, with geological parties lead by K.A. Townley and J.F. Ivanac respectively in the Mt. Isa District, Queensland. At this time E.K. Carter had carried out one week's mapping in the south of Mt. Isa township, and had traced the Mt. Isa shale and dolomitic shale for about 12 miles south of the mine. He had shown that the Templeton granite was concordant and that it was younger in age than the Mt. Isa sediments. The writer, after considering the work carried out by E.K. Carter and a study of the photographs of the region and of the geology of Mt. Isa Mines, came to the conclusions listed herein. Observations and recommendations are discussed.

  • The area investigated lies on the outskirts of Kotara, a suburb in the S.W. of Newcastle. The coal of interest is in the Burwood Seam. Drilling, field work, and surveying were carried out in the area. These operations are described in this report. Drilling results are discussed.