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  • Promotional flyer detailing the 2015 offshore petroleum Acreage Release and exploration opportunities in Australia. For distribution at NAPE 2015.

  • The Georgina Basin is a Neoproterozoic to Lower Devonian sedimentary basin covering 325,000 km2 of western Queensland and the Northern Territory. It is a northwest-southeast-trending extensional basin, with prospective conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon targets within Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate and siliciclastic rock units in the southern depocentres. Recent biostratigraphic work has highlighted an age discrepancy in the prospective organic-rich `hot shale in the base of the middle Cambrian Arthur Creek Formation. This unit is present in the two major southern depocentres, the Dulcie and Toko synclines, where it has previously been considered as correlative. Recent results, however, suggest that the basal `hot shale is either significantly younger in the Toko Syncline than in the Dulcie Syncline, or represents a very condensed section in the former. Middle Cambrian carbon isotope excursions have been correlated across a number of Australian basins and can be used to test correlative models across the Georgina depocentres. In the current study, high resolution sampling across this middle Cambrian section has been carried out in a number of wells in the Dulcie Syncline and in the Undilla Sub-basin, where the age equivalent Inca Shale is penetrated. Carbon isotopes from organic carbon (kerogen) as well as carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of four carbonate mineral phases (calcite, ankerite, dolomite and siderite) were analysed. These new data are compared with the existing carbon isotope stratigraphy from the Dulcie and Toko synclines. Initial results corroborate the new biostratigraphic interpretation. This work will provide a detailed understanding of middle Cambrian isotope signatures and correlate this prospective unit across the southern Georgina Basin.

  • The full SENTINEL-2 mission comprises twin polar-orbiting satellites in the same orbit, phased at 180° to each other. The mission carries optical sensors and monitors variability in land surface conditions.

  • Ratio U2/Th - Ratio of U2 over Th derived from the filtered U and Th grids, units: dimensionless The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • Ratio of U over K derived from the filtered U and K grids, units: dimensionless The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • Gravity data measure small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data are collected on geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • Coastal communities in Australia are particularly exposed to coincident natural hazards, whereby tropical cyclones and extra-tropical storms cause damage to infrastructure and shorelines from severe wind, flood and storm surge. Because the climatic drivers of severe storms are stronger under certain conditions (e.g. during La Ni±a periods for tropical cyclones), these events can repeatedly impact the coast over periods of weeks to months. Historically, major episodes of beach erosion along southeast Australia have occurred during every decade over the last century, with the most severe in 1974 resulting from two extra-tropical storms in two months. <p>While the process of beach erosion is well understood in general terms, the response of a specific sector of coast to clustered storms may not be. For effective coastal management, this site specific knowledge becomes essential. Here we present a framework for integrating coastal geomorphology and coastal engineering approaches to model shoreline response to clustered storms at a spatial scale that can directly inform management agencies. We focus on two case study areas in southeast Australia, the beaches of the Adelaide metropolitan coast (South Australia) and Old Bar beach (central New South Wales) where erosion is a management priority. <p>For each site we adopt the coastal sediment compartment as the functional management unit, mapped for the Australian continent at multiple spatial scales, and use sub-surface information (boreholes, ground penetrating radar profiles) to estimate sediment volumes in the upper beach to foredune. These data are then used to inform shoreline response modelling linked to an event time series (observed and hind cast) as a separate project component. Future work includes assessment of `at-risk infrastructure at each site. This paper is a contribution to the Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Centre project Storm surge: Resilience to clustered disaster events on the coast.

  • Poster for presentation at European Space Agency 'Fringe' conference, 23-27 March 2015.

  • This paper describes the purpose, design and implementation of a new regional-scale geodetic network that has been installed in the Surat Basin, Queensland, completed in November 2014. The network incorporates 65 survey marks and 40 radar corner reflectors to enable the combination of Global Navigation Satellite System measurements with remotely-sensed surface displacement maps derived using the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique. The combination of these geodetic techniques in this region will bring an enhanced understanding of how resource extraction affects the surface, leading to increased productivity and environmental management.

  • This web service displays the results of a marine survey conducted by Geoscience Australia in Commonwealth waters of the north-eastern Browse Basin (Caswell Sub-basin) between 9 October and 9 November 2014. The additional codes GA-0345 and GA-0346 refer to Geoscience Australia (GA) internal codes and TAN1411 is the vessel survey number given by the RV Tangaroa for 2014.