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  • This system provides magnetic, radiometric, gravity and digital elevation data from Australian National, State and Territory Government geophysical data archives.

  • The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS), also known as Daichi, is a Japanese satellite launched on 24 January 2006. The satellite provides high quality, low cost Earth observation data for topographical mapping, disaster and environmental monitoring and climate change studies. ALOS also provides an alternative source of data and a level of back-up to the Landsat series of satellites.

  • This application provides quick-look images and download options of the MOD43 Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance (NBAR) Products generated by ACRES. These products are a composite, generated for MODIS spectral bands 1-7 at the mean solar zenith angle over a 16 day period. In addition to the NBAR composite products, the BRDF parameters for each band, the ancillary, and band quality information are also provided. Each NBAR composite product is in GeoTIFF format at 500 metres resolution. All of the files are compressed using gzip/tar as "*.tar.gz". For Windows gzip/tar support please try WinZip.

  • This page provides quick-look images and basic metadata for all Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) acquisitions made by Geoscience Australia Earth Observation in the past seven days. Each swath is labelled by orbit number and date, and is divided into scenes or "Granules". Time of day is shown using Co-ordinated Universal Time (UTC) which is similar to Greenwich Mean Time. Australian Eastern Standard time is UTC plus 10 hours. Data for download is in a specialised format suitable for image analysis by professional users. If a simple image file (*.jpg) only is required, click on the magnifying glass, then right-click on the enlarged image and Save Picture As to save to your local drive. First enlargement is approx five kilometre pixels and the second enlargement is approx one kilometre pixels. Quick-look images derived from HDF datasets are cropped at 180°E - (The HDF datasets themselves are complete).

  • The Geoscience Australia Product Catalogue contains metadata conforming to the ISO 19115-1 Geographic Information metadata standard, describing resource types including datasets, publications, services, models, software and more.

  • SIFRA is the acronym for 'System for Infrastructure Facility Resilience Analysis'. The system provides an analytical approach for modelling the vulnerability of high-value infrastructure facilities by taking into consideration the fragilities and configurations of its constituent components. In doing this it uses a network theory based approach for modelling the facility and its operations. This method makes it possible to consider the discrete component-level vulnerabilities within a facility and, significantly, their system-level operational implications to the composite facility fragility. SIFRA also includes tools for modelling system restoration times under varied levels of resource allocation scenarios, and for identifying component criticality.

  • Geoscience Australia's World Wind Viewer is an application developed using NASA's World Wind Java Software Development Kit (SDK) to display Australia's continental data sets. The viewer allows you to compare national data sets such as the radioelements, the gravity and magnetic anomalies, and other mapping layers, and show the data draped over the Australian terrain in three dimensions.

  • Program PRINSAS (PRocessing and INterpretation of Small Angle Scattering data) takes raw SANS, SAXS, USANS and USAXS data, stores the data, and allows the user to further process and interpret the data. Although any small angle scattering data can be accepted, PRINSAS has been specifically designed for the processing and interpretation of SAS data for rocks and other media with a wide distribution of scatterer sizes.

  • SUNAZ is a set of computer programs comprising SUNAZ and SUNIN to calculate azimuth-by-hour-angle observations of the Sun to determine true north azimuth to an azimuth mark based on the observing proforma described in K.A. Weinert (1980), Notes on Geomagnetic Observatory and Survey Practice, Earth Science 5, UNESCO, paragraph 246, page 36, using the algorithm described in G.G.Bennett (1980), "A Solar Ephemeris for use with Programmable Calculators", The Australian Surveyor, Vol.30, No.3, pp 147-151.

  • The MTPy Python library is open source software that aims to facilitate processing, analysis, modelling, and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data. Until recently, MTpy has contained bugs and gaps in both functionality and documentation, which have limited its use to date. We are developing MTPy to rectify these problems and expand functionality. Key improvements include adding new functions and classes to the modules that handle ModEM inputs and outputs, improving data and model visualization tools, refactoring the code to improve maintainability, quality, and consistency, and developing documentation.