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  • This resource contains sediment data for the Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) in the Timor Sea collected by Geoscience Australia during September and October 2012 on RV Solander (survey GA0339/SOL5650). Seabed sediment samples were collected from four survey areas by either a Smith McIntyre grab or box corer at 62 stations, divided between Area 1 (n=22), Area 2 (n=17), Area 3 (n=21) and Area 4 (n=2). The Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve survey was undertaken as an activity within the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program Marine Biodiversity Hub and was the key component of Research Theme 4 - Regional Biodiversity Discovery to Support Marine Bioregional Plans. Hub partners involved in the survey included the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Geoscience Australia, the University of Western Australia, Museum Victoria and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. Data acquired during the survey included: multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; sub-bottom acoustic profiles; physical samples of seabed sediments, infauna and epibenthic biota; towed underwater video and still camera observations of seabed habitats; baited video observations of demersal and pelagic fish, and; oceanographic measurements of the water column from CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) casts and from deployment of sea surface drifters. Further information on the survey is available in the post-survey report published as Geoscience Australia Record 2013/38 (Nichol et al. 2013).

  • <p>Flythrough movie of Bremer Commonwealth Marine Reserve, southwest Western Australia showing bathymetry of Bremer Canyon, Hood Canyon, Henry Canyon and Knob canyon. <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.

  • This dataset contains probability values of rocky/hard seabed (multibeam angular backscatter response derived product) from seabed mapping surveys in Darwin Harbour. The survey was undertaken during the period 24 June to 20 August 2011 by iXSurvey Australia Pty Ltd for the Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport (NRETAS) in collaboration with Geoscience Australia (GA), the Darwin Port Corporation (DPC) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) using GA's Kongsberg EM3002D multibeam sonar system and DPC's vessel Matthew Flinders. The survey obtained detailed bathymetric map of Darwin Harbour. Refer to the GA record ' Mapping and Classification of Darwin Harbour Seabed' for further information on processing techniques applied (GeoCat: 79212; GA Record: 2015/xx)

  • This dataset provides the spatially continuous data of seabed gravel (sediment fraction >2000 µm), mud (sediment fraction < 63 µm) and sand content (sediment fraction 63-2000 µm) expressed as a weight percentage ranging from 0 to 100%, presented in 0.0025 decimal degree (dd) resolution raster grids format and ascii text file. The dataset covers the Petrel sub-basin in the Australian continental EEZ. This dataset supersedes previous predictions of sediment gravel, mud and sand content for the basin with demonstrated improvements in accuracy. Accuracy of predictions varies based on density of underlying data and level of seabed complexity. Artefacts occur in this dataset as a result of insufficient samples in relevant regions. This dataset is intended for use at the basin scale. The dataset may not be appropriate for use at smaller scales in areas where sample density is insufficient to detect local variation in sediment properties. To obtain the most accurate interpretation of sediment distribution in these areas, it is recommended that additional samples be collected and interpolations updated.

  • Phase two of the China Australia Geological Storage of CO2 (CAGS2) project aimed to build on the success of the previous CAGS project and promote capacity building, training opportunities and share expertise on the geological storage of CO2. The project was led by Geoscience Australia (GA) and China's Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) through the Administrative Centre for China's Agenda 21 (ACCA21). CAGS2 has successfully completed all planned activities including three workshops, two carbon capture and storage (CCS) training schools, five research projects focusing on different aspects of the geological storage of CO2, and ten researcher exchanges to China and Australia. The project received favourable feedback from project partners and participants in CAGS activities and there is a strong desire from the Chinese government and Chinese researchers to continue the collaboration. The project can be considered a highly successful demonstration of bi-lateral cooperation between the Australian and Chinese governments. Through the technical workshops, training schools, exchange programs, and research projects, CAGS2 has facilitated and supported on-going collaboration between many research institutions and industry in Australia and China. More than 150 experts, young researchers and college students, from over 30 organisations, participated in CAGS2. The opportunity to interact with Australian and international experts at CAGS hosted workshops and schools was appreciated by the participants, many of whom do not get the opportunity to attend international conferences. Feedback from a CAGS impact survey found that the workshops and schools inspired many researchers and students to pursue geological storage research. The scientific exchanges proved effective and often fostered further engagement between Chinese and Australian researchers and their host organisations. The research projects often acted as a catalyst for attracting additional CCS funding (at least A$700,000), including two projects funded under the China Clean Development Mechanism Fund. CAGS sponsored research led to reports, international conference presentations, and Chinese and international journal papers. CAGS has established a network of key CCS/CCUS (carbon capture, utilisation and storage) researchers in China and Australia. This is exemplified by the fact that 4 of the 6 experts that provided input on the 'storage section of the 12th Five-Year plan for Scientific and Technological Development of Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage, which laid out the technical policy priorities for R&D and demonstration of CCUS technology in China, were CAGS affiliated researchers. The contributions of CAGS to China's capacity building and policy CCUS has been acknowledged by the Chinese Government. CAGS support of young Chinese researchers is particularly noted and well regarded. Letters have been sent to the Secretary of the Department of Industry and Science and to the Deputy CEO of Geoscience Australia, expressing China's gratitude for the Australian Government's support and GA's cooperation in the CAGS project.

  • In May 2013, Geoscience Australia (GA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) undertook a collaborative seabed mapping survey (GA0340/ SOL5754) on the Leveque Shelf, a distinct geological province within the Browse Basin, offshore Western Australia. The purpose of the survey was to acquire geophysical and biophysical data on seabed environments over a previously identified potential CO2 injection site to better understand the overlying seabed habitats and to assess potential for fluid migration to the seabed. Mapping and sampling was undertaken across six areas using multibeam and single beam echosounders, sub-bottom profilers, sidescan sonar, underwater towed-video, gas sensors, water column profiler, grab samplers, and vibrocorer. Over 1070 km2 of seabed and water column was mapped using the multibeam and single beam echosounder, in water depths ranging between 40 and 120 m. The sub-surface was investigated using the multichannel and the parametric sub-bottom profilers along lines totalling 730 km and 1547 km in length respectively. Specific seabed features were investigated over 44 line km using the sidescan sonar and physically and sampled at 58 stations. Integration of this newly acquired data with existing seismic data will provide new insights into the geology of the Leveque Shelf. This work will contribute to the Australian Government's National CO2 Infrastructure Plan (NCIP) by providing key seabed environmental and geological data to better inform the assessment of the CO2 storage potential in this area of the Browse Basin. This dataset contains identifications of Polychaetes collected from 64 Smith-McIntyre grabs deployed during GA0340/SOL5754.

  • This report provides the first comprehensive assessment of geomorphological and geological features of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) whose intrinsic characteristics represent elements of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA). Specific examples of these features are described and an initial assessment made of the environmental pressures that they currently or in the future may experience. Importantly, the information compiled in this report improves our knowledge of an important set of physical and biophysical features in the GBRWHA with key natural heritage values and thereby has the potential to better inform the conservation and management of this unique region.

  • Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to map vegetation with potential access to groundwater in the basalt provinces in the Upper Burdekin. NDVI is widely used to infer vegetation density and/or vigour. Several studies (e.g. Barron et al., 2014; Gou et al., 2015; Lv et al., 2013) have used NDVI to identify groundwater-dependent vegetation (GDV) based on the hypothesis that during dry seasons or extended dry periods, soil moisture progressively becomes depleted. Under these conditions, GDV are expected to exhibit minimal or no reduction in condition relative to vegetation subject to the same conditions that do not have access to groundwater.<br> <b>References: </b><br> Barron OV, Emelyanova I, Van Niel TG, Pollock D and Hodgson G (2014) Mapping groundwater-dependent ecosystems using remote sensing measures of vegetation and moisture dynamics. Hydrological processes 28(2), 372-385. Doi: 10.1002/hyp.9609; Gou S, Gonzales S and Miller GR (2015) Mapping Potential Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems for Sustainable Management. Ground Water 53(1), 99-110. Doi: 10.1111/gwat.12169; Lv J, Wang X-S, Zhou Y, Qian K, Wan L, Eamus D and Tao Z (2013) Groundwater-dependent distribution of vegetation in Hailiutu River catchment, a semi-arid region in China. Ecohydrology 6(1), 142-149. Doi: 10.1002/eco.1254.

  • Relatively little is known about what the seafloor of Australia’s continental shelf looks like or has living on it. Geoscience Australia (GA), together with other partners, undertakes a range of marine surveys to improve our understanding and management of Australia's marine environments. One component of the research involves the collection of underwater imagery to directly observe and characterise coastal and deep sea habitats. In some regions these surveys build on existing baseline knowledge, but in many areas, particularly deep offshore locations, these surveys provide the first images of the seafloor. The imagery collection includes both still and video imagery collected using various systems, including towed platforms, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Post-survey reports and metadata files are included as part of the collection, which describe further details of the surveys and respective imagery collections. The seafloor imagery provides a wealth of information about the geological features, habitats and life forms occurring throughout Australia's marine jurisdiction. <b>Value: </b>Improve the understanding and management of Australia's marine environments. <b>Scope: </b>GA surveys from 2007 onwards in waters around Australia and Australia’s Antarctic Territory. <b>To view catalogue records associated with this collection click on the keyword "HVC_144640" below</b>

  • <p>A new finite volume algorithm to solve the two dimensional shallow water equations on an unstructured triangular mesh has been implemented in the open source ANUGA software, which is jointly developed by the Australian National University and Geoscience Australia. The algorithm supports discontinuouselevation, or `jumps in the bed profile between neighbouring cells. This has a number of benefits compared with previously implemented continuous-elevation approaches. Firstly it can preserve stationary states at wetdry fronts without using any mesh porosity type treatment. It can also simulate very shallow frictionally dominated flow down sloping topography, as typically occurs in direct-rainfall flood models. In the latter situation, mesh porosity type treatments lead to artificial storage of mass in cells and associated mass conservation issues, whereas continuous-elevation approaches with good performance on shallow frictionally dominated flows tend to have difficulties preserving stationary states near wet-dry fronts. The discontinuous-elevation approach shows good performance in both situations, and mass is conserved to a very high degree, consistent with floating point error. <p>A further benefit of the discontinuous-elevation approach, when combined with an unstructured mesh, is that the model can sharply resolve rapid changes in the topography associated with e.g. narrow prismatic drainage channels, or buildings, without the computational expense of a very fine mesh. The boundaries between such features can be embedded in the mesh using break-lines, and the user can optionally specify that different elevation datasets are used to set the elevation within different parts of the mesh (e.g. often it is convenient to use a raster DEM in terrestrial areas, and surveyed channel bed points in rivers). <p>The discontinuous elevation approach also supports a simple and computationally efficient treatment of river walls. These are arbitrarily narrow walls between cells, higher than the topography on either side, where the flow is controlled by a weir equation and optionally transitions back to the shallow water solution for sufficiently submerged flows. This allows modelling of levees or lateral weirs much finer than the mesh size. A number of benchmark tests are presented illustrating these features of the algorithm. All these features of the model can be run in serial or parallel, on clusters or shared memory machines, with good efficiency improvements on 10s-100s of cores depending on the number of mesh triangles and other case-specific details