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  • This resource includes bathymetry data acquired during the Arafura Marine Park bathymetry survey using Kongsberg EM300 multibeam sonar system. The Arafura Marine Park bathymetry survey (SS052005/GA0282); also known as Arafura Sea survey; was led by Geoscience Australia aboard the National facility research vessel Southern Surveyor from the 30th of April to the 27th of May 2005. The primary objective of the expedition was to collect seismic and oceanographic data, mapping the sea floor and taking geological samples over various habitats. Another objective was to collect baseline information on the biodiversity of a smaller region within the Arafura Sea. This V1 dataset contains two 5m and 8m resolution 32-bit floating point geotiff files of the new Arafura Marine Park bathymetry, derived from the processed EM300 bathymetry data, using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • This resource includes bathymetry data for South-west Corner Marine Park collected by Geoscience Australia during the periods 9 – 12 March 2020 and 27 January – 16 February 2021 on the charter vessel Santosha. The survey was undertaken as a collaborative project with the University of Western Australia, the University of Tasmania and the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (University of Sydney), and funded through the National Environmental Science Program Marine Biodiversity Hub, with co-investment by all partners and the Director of National Parks. The purpose of the project was to build baseline information for benthic habitats on the continental shelf in the marine park that will support ongoing environmental monitoring within the South-West Marine Park Network as part of the 10-year management plan (2018-2028). Data acquisition for the project included multibeam bathymetry and backscatter for an area covering 330 km^2 (excluding transit) offshore from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin coast, with underwater imagery of benthic communities and demersal fish collected by the University of Western Australia on separate field deployments. This bathymetry dataset contains a 5 m resolution 32-bit geotiff file of the survey area produced from the processed Kongsberg EM2040C multibeam sonar system using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. For further information see: Giraldo-Ospina, A. et al., 2021. South-west Corner Marine Park Post Survey Report. Report to the National Environmental Science Program, Marine Biodiversity Hub.

  • This resource includes seabed backscatter data for South-west Corner Marine Park collected by Geoscience Australia during the periods 9 – 12 March 2020 and 27 January – 16 February 2021 on the charter vessel Santosha. The survey was undertaken as a collaborative project with the University of Western Australia, the University of Tasmania and the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (University of Sydney) and funded through the National Environmental Science Program Marine Biodiversity Hub, with co-investment by all partners and the Director of National Parks. The purpose of the project was to build baseline information for benthic habitats on the continental shelf in the marine park that will support ongoing environmental monitoring within the South-west Marine Park Network as part of the 10-year management plan (2018-2028). Data acquisition for the project included multibeam bathymetry and backscatter for an area covering 330 km^2 offshore from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin coast, with underwater imagery of benthic communities and demersal fish collected by University of Western Australia on separate field deployments. This backscatter dataset contains a 4 m resolution 32-bit geotiff file of the survey area produced from the processed Kongsberg EM2040C multibeam sonar system data using the CMST-GA MB Process v15.04.04.0 (.64) toolbox software co-developed by the Centre for Marine Science and Technology at Curtin University and Geoscience Australia. For further information see: Giraldo-Ospina, A. et al., 2021. South-west Corner Marine Park Post Survey Report. Report to the National Environmental Science Program, Marine Biodiversity Hub.

  • The Browse Basin, located offshore on Australia's North West Shelf, contains major natural gas accumulations, some of which present high abundances of helium. The basin also contains large quantities of CO2 with some wells containing up to ~18 mol% CO2. Currently there is no information as to the origins of He and CO2 within the Browse Basin, despite this providing important information to the evolution of the natural gas. By understanding where components of the gas originate, it is possible to make predictions about areas that may be high in CO2, which would be problematic for production; conversely areas rich in He could present a second revenue stream from the same well.

  • This resource includes bathymetry data acquired during the Keppel Bay 2004 bathymetry survey. Data were collected using a Reson SeaBat 8125 multibeam sonar system by Curtin University of Technology (CUT), Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) and Geoscience Australia (GA) on the charter vessel Rum Rambler during the period 20th – 26th September 2004. The survey was undertaken as a collaborative project between CUT, DSTO and GA under the Coastal Water Habitat Mapping (CWHM) Project within Coastal Cooperative Research Centre Program. The purpose of the project was to build baseline information for benthic habitats within the study area. This V1 dataset contains a 1m resolution 32-bit floating point geotiff file of the bathmetry of target areas in Keppel Bay, derived from the processed Reson SeaBat 8125 bathymetry data, using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • The Stavely region has been described as a continental-margin arc system that developed on the eastern margin of Australia in the mid-Cambrian (c. 510490 Ma). The joint Geoscience AustraliaGeological Survey of Victoria Stavely Project, investigating the regional geology and mineral systems of the Stavely region, resulted in 14 stratigraphic holes being drilled testing regional geological models and recovering material from potentially prospective basement rocks under cover to characterise the subsurface geology. Drill core and field site samples were taken for mineral separation to extract zircon for U-Pb, Lu-Hf, O isotope and trace element geochemical analyses. The analysed samples reported here include rocks from the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex (MSVC), including mineralised dactic porphyries, and the Bushy Creek Igneous Complex (BCIC). The U-Pb data provide age constraints on the rocks; the Lu-Hf data indicates the relative `maturity of the rocks; the O isotopes indicated the degrees of continental crustal input/recycling into the parent melt; the trace element data provides an indication of the crystallisation environment, including providing evidence of mixing of magmas and subsequent compositional changes. U-Pb data indicate that the ages of many of the igneous rocks in the Stavely region are c. 510500 Ma. Available data indicate that the MSVC was emplaced both during and after deposition of the turbiditic Nargoon Group sediments. Mineralised dacitic porphyries were syn-eruptive with the MSVC, and rocks of the BCIC were emplaced at the same time and after both the MSVC and porphyries. New U-Pb dating of zircon from rocks of the BCIC also suggests they may be syn- to post-deformation, rather than purely post-deformation. O isotope data yield d18O values less than that of the `normal mantle through to values similar to and greater then `normal mantle (values), indicating possible evolution of the arc and increase of crustal material that assimilated into later stage magmas. The samples that yield lower than `normal mantle d18O values are interpreted to have been derived from hydrothermally altered, subducted rocks that were remelted and did not significantly interact with the overlying continental crust at the time of emplacement. The mineralised porphyries display eHf values indicative of depleted mantle suggesting the melt is juvenile (i.e. do not display significant amounts of crustal reworking), while the eHf values of the MSVC rocks are more evolved. This suggests that there were multiple, distinct source magmas that had a different history (i.e. porphyries little to no crustal input, while MSVC rocks had a source with some crustal input). The plutonic rocks of the BCIC are interpreted to have had a greater degree of crustal input again. The combination of isotopic and trace element geochemical data from zircon allows for discrimination of the differences of rock units based on timing, maturity and degree of crustal reworking of their parent melts. This provides a powerful tool in assisting in unravelling the tectonic environment of the continental margin arc setting of the Stavely region.

  • Great Artesian Basin borehole porosity and permeability data from petroleum exploration wells within the GAB, quality checked by Jim Kellet (Geoscience Australia). Data is available in tabular format as a CSV file (comma delimited) and a Microsoft Excel 2010 file. This data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and reported in: Section 5.5 'Hydrogeological properties' of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Central Eromanga region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Surat region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 76562.

  • This resource includes bathymetry data acquired during the Bremer, Leeuwin and Perth Canyons bathymetry survey using Kongsberg EM302 and EM710 multibeam sonar systems. The Bremer, Leeuwin and Perth Canyons survey (FK200126/GA4865), also known as The Great Australian Deep-Sea Coral and Canyon Adventure survey (https://schmidtocean.org/cruise/coralandcanyonadventure), was led by Dr. Julie Trotter (The University of Western Australia) and Dr. Paolo Montagna (Institute of Polar Sciences) aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor, from the 26th of January to the 25th of February 2020. The primary objective of the expedition was to map underwater landscapes in the Bremer, Leeuwin and Perth Canyons, characterise chemical and physical oceanography, and use the SOIs ROV SuBastian to capture high-definition video and collect samples. This V1 dataset contains nine 2m to 64m resolution 32-bit floating point geotiff files of the bathymetry in these three study areas and transits, derived from the processed EM302 and EM710 bathymetry data, using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. An independently processed dataset in GSF format is available at https://www.marine-geo.org/tools/search/DataSets.php?data_set_uids=30215,30216 produced by researchers on the cruise: F. Foglini, A. Remia, J. Trotter and P. Montagna (2021; http://get.iedadata.org/doi/330215 & http://get.iedadata.org/doi/330215). This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • This resource includes bathymetry data acquired during a transit from Sydney to Albany using a Kongsberg EM302 multibeam sonar system. The transit (FK200110/GA4864) was undertaken by the Schmidt Ocean Institute, using research vessel Falkor, from the 10th of January to the 18th of January 2020. The primary objective of the transit was to reach the Bremer Canyon survey area. This V1 dataset contains three 16m to 64m resolution 32-bit floating point geotiff files of the bathymetry data collected on the transit, derived from the processed EM302 bathymetry data, using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • In the last century coastal erosion has caused significant damage to property and infrastructure in NSW. Extreme erosion can be caused by individual extreme storms, or by multi-storm 'clusters' which induce disproportionate erosion by limiting the time for inter-storm shoreline recovery. Statistical changes in storm wave properties also occur in association with seasonal and ENSO (El-Nino Southern Oscillation) cycles, and a number of studies suggest the latter affects the mean shoreline position and likelihood of extreme erosion in NSW. Quantification of site-specific erosion hazards is necessary to support coastal management, with probabilistic or risk-based approaches being particularly attractive because they avoid reliance on arbitrarily chosen 'design' events. Callaghan et al. (2008) developed a methodology for probabilistic erosion hazard assessment on sandy shorelines, combining a probabilistic model of storm waves with a deterministic shoreline evolution model. The probability of the shoreline eroding past a given position (over a given timeframe) may be quantified, and epistemic uncertainties associated with e.g., our limited knowledge of the frequency of very large storms, are accounted for with bootstrapping. Herein we develop a probabilistic model of the storm wave climate at Old Bar, NSW, for use in a coastal erosion hazard assessment. A novel aspect of the model is that it accounts for the impacts of ENSO and seasonality on the storm wave properties, and the frequency of storm events. We establish relationships between ENSO, seasonality, and storm waves in the area using 30 years of wave observations, and extend the statistical framework of Callaghan et al. (2008) to account for these factors. This study is a key component of the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC Project "Resilience to clustered disaster events on the coast ¿ storm surge". References: Callaghan et al., (2008) Statistical Simulation of wave climate and extreme beach erosion. Coastal Engineering 2008, 55, 375-390.