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  • Serendipaceratops (sair-en-dip-a-sair-a-tops). The full name of this dinosaur is Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei. It is named for Arthur C. Clarke, author of books such as '2001 - A Space Odyssey' and 'Rendezvous with Rama'. Did you know that Clarke first became interested in science as a child because he was interested in dinosaurs? Ceratopsian (sair-a-top-see-an) dinosaurs first appeared in the Early Cretaceous, the period of time immediately after the Jurassic. Ceratopsian dinosaurs had horns and beak-like jaws. A very well-known example was Triceratops, a North American dinosaur with three horns on its head and a large, bony neck frill. Serendipaceratops was one of the earliest known ceratopsian dinosaurs. It was actually a protoceratopsian - proto means first or original. The first known bone from Serendipaceratops was discovered in Australia near Kilcunda, on Victoria's south-east coast. It is a forearm bone (ulna) about 115 million years old. This fossil could be an important clue that ceratopsian dinosaurs evolved in, or near, Australia and not Asia as previously thought. Another ceratopsian arm bone was also found at Dinosaur Cove, in south-west Victoria. It is a little younger at 106 million years old. As an early ceratopsian dinosaur, Serendipaceratops probably had beak-like jaws, only a very small neck frill and no horns. The beak-like jaw suggests it was a herbivore; a plant eater. This dinosaur was only about 2 metres long.

  • The Bureau of Mineral Resources made a seismic survey in the western part of the Galilee Basin in the central Queensland in 1975. The aim of the survey was to obtain basic information on the extent and thickness of the western part of the basin, which is entirely concealed beneath the Eromanga Basin. The seismic survey recorded 320 km of continuous single-coverage reflection recording and 18 km of six-fold CDP recording during 87 operating days. Two major faults were mapped. The Holberton Structure, previously known from geological mapping, corresponds to a major fault in the subsurface with up to 300 m of downthrownto the west. Another major fault appears to be a southerly continuation of the Cork Fault. For the other two Galilee Basin surveys, please see L102 and L108. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74978

  • Australia is an island continenet extending from tropical to midlatitude waters with an Exclusive Economic Zone of some 8.6 million square kilometres. Its regional seas are exposed to climatological conditions ranging from the westerly Roaring Forties winds in the south, to monsoon and tropical cyclone conditions in the north. It also encompasses regions of extreme biodiversity, with 80 percent of southern temperate species endemic to the region. The focus of marine research in Australia is becoming more interdisciplinary in response to factors such as the national government's recent Oceans Policy, which emphasises sustainable development and ecological based management. However, historically there have been relatevely few major interdisciplinary studies in Australian waters.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 85 Western Australia coastal waterways. The classification system contains 11 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Central basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Western Australia has a diverse range of Estuaries due to different climates. Ranging from mostly "near pristine" and tide influenced estuaries in the north to "near pristine" wave dominated estuaries in the southwest region.

  • Detrital zircons from 13 Late Mesoproterozoic to Early Neoproterozoic sandstones and two Palaeozoic sandstones from Tasmania were dated in order to improve constraints on depositional ages, to test correlation between Proterozoic inliers, and to characterise source regions. These include successions considered to be the oldest presently exposed in Tasmania. Typical features of the age distributions of the Proterozoic rocks are prominent data concentrations at 1800-1650 Ma and 1450-1400 Ma, and a minor spread of Archaean ages. Statistical testing of the similarity of the age profiles shows that widespread quartzarenaceous samples from the Detention Subgroup, Needles Quartzite and from the Tyennan region are strongly similar, consistent with broad correlation. Relatively large differences are seen between the Detention Subgroup and the conformable, stratigraphically higher Jacob Quartzite, which contains an additional spread of 1300-1000 Ma zircons suggestive of a Grenvillian source. Age profiles of the quartzarenites and quartzwacke turbidites (Oonah Formation and correlatives) cannot be readily differentiated. The Oonah Formation likewise includes samples with and without Grenvillian ages, and there is no 750 Ma zircon population that would be expected if the turbidites were genetically related to the Wickham Orogeny. The simplest interpretation is that the quartzarenites (Rocky Cape Group and correlatives) and the turbidites (Oonah Formation and correlates) are lateral equivalents, although a younger (post-Wickham Orogeny) age for the Oonah Formation cannot be discounted. A maximum age of ca 1000 Ma is inferred for the Oonah Formation, Rocky Cape Group and correlatives. A minimum age of ca 750 Ma is provided by the basal age of the overlying Togari Group and correlatives. In a metasediment from western King Island, the youngest detrital zircons are ca 1350 Ma, allowing a pre-Grenvillian depositional age as suggested by previous dating of metamorphic monazite. However, the age profile of this sample is not dissimilar to the other Tasmanian successions that are inferred to be 1000-750 Ma. The Wings Sandstone, of southern Tasmania, contains an unusual profile dominated by Grenvillian ages, consistent with an allochthonous origin. Basement ages that broadly match the age spectra of the Tasmanian Proterozoic sediments are found in southwestern Laurentia, consistent with mutual proximity in Rodinia reconstructions. The Palaeozoic sandstones, from the turbiditic Mathinna Supergroup of northeastern Tasmania, have zircon age profiles typical of the Lachlan Fold Belt, with a predominant latest Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian component and a lesser, broad Proterozoic data concentration at ca 1000 Ma. Western Tasmania was not a significant part of the source area for these rocks.

  • Survey conducted by the Commonwealth Government or State/Territory Geological Survey (or equivalent) collecting airborne geophysical data

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 15 Northern Territory coastal waterways. The classification system contains 9 easily identifiable and representative environments: Bedrock, Channel, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Most of the 15 coastal waterways have a "Near Pristine" environmental condition (as opposed to "Modified"), according to the National Land and Water Resources Audit definition. Estuaries in the Northern Territory are predominantly tide-dominated barrier estuaries.

  • The almost complete absence of basement outcrop or surface expression of mineralisation is the prime impediment to mineral exploration in the Gawler Craton of South Australia, and large areas elsewhere in Australia (Fig. 1). To explore in these covered terranes, we need high quality regional information, plus tools and techniques that allow us to better utilise the limited direct geological information from buried rocks. Analysis of potential-field data is one of the most common and cost-effective ways of inferring hidden geology. There are high quality aeromagnetic data available over most of the actively explored areas of Australia, and it is hoped that more closely-spaced ground gravity measurements, together with improvements in airborne gravity and airborne gravity gradiometer methods, will in the future raise the standard of gravity coverage to that of the magnetics.

  • Regional-scale constrained potential field inversions can be used to map rock types, alteration, and structure. This is particularly valuable when basement is obscured by younger cover. The methods outlined in this study have been applied to a 150 km × 150 km region around the giant Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit, where abundant haematite, sulphide, and magnetite alteration produce strong potential field signatures despite thick cover. The results are used to develop the first 3D map of magnetite and haematite/sulphide alteration for the Olympic Cu-Au province, and show that the alteration around known Cu-Au mineral occurrences can be detected using coarse regional-scale inversions. The provision of a reference model in the inversion formulation permits geological observations to be introduced into the inversion process to guide the inversion towards more geologically reasonable results. This allows hypotheses regarding 3D geological architecture to be rigorously tested for compatibility with potential field data. An iterative procedure of inversion followed by updating the reference model allows 3D maps of alteration and structure that are consistent with both the known geology and observed potential field data.

  • This paper was presented at the 17th Australian Geological Convention, Geological Society of Australia