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  • The Nunyerrie Asbestos Deposits are associated with a remnant of metamorphosed ultrabasic rocks in granite country, which is part of a group of Pre-Cambrian rocks of Archaean age. The ultrabasics form an east northeast trending ridge about 1 mile long and 250 feet average width, which rises to a maximum elevation of 300 feet above the general level of the surrounding country. The belt of ultrabasics is highly sheared and jointed and consists chiefly of serpentines, but talcose rocks, chlorite schists, authophyllite rock and what appear to be hydro-biotite schists also occur. The ultrabasics have an intrusive junction with the surrounding granite rocks, and they are intruded by quartz veins and granitic dykes. The deposits were investigated by the author. This report gives an overview of the deposits. Workings, production figures, reserves, grades, and prices are described.

  • These deposits were visited between the 3rd and 5th July, 1951. The investigations were carried out in order to obtain a first hand knowledge of the extent and mode of occurrence of the deposits, and to select a number of diamond drill hole sites to test the continuity of the deposits at depth. This report gives an account of the investigations and their findings.

  • An earlier report (Record 1950/041) has described the geophysical survey carried out early in 1950 on the Renison Bell tin field. The present report deals with the work of a second field season which commenced in November 1950 and continued until June 1951. The methods used were again the magnetic and self-potential. The 1950 survey was extended to the south and east by continuing along the Renison Bell Hill base-line a further 1000 feet south and reading stations on both sides of this base-line along traverses extending from the main quartz-porphyry dyke to the headwaters of the Montana Creek. In addition, some of the traverses were extended over the saddle between Dreadnought and Stebbins Hills as far as the Boulder tramway. The report gives an account of the survey work and its results, and provides recommendations for future testing. The geological features of the area covered by the present geophysical survey are briefly described.

  • The object of my trip to the United States of America was to discuss problems of micropalaeontology with various authorities in that country, to visit the palaeontological laboratories of the United States Geological Survey and National Museum, State Universities, Museums and laboratories of oil companies and to enquire into the latest techniques used in oil-field laboratories. I was also to attend the joint Annual Convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Society of Economic Palaeontologists and Mineralogists and Society of Exploratory Geophysicists at St. Louis. This report gives an account of the institutions visited by the author and the principal results of the visit.

  • The Palaeozoic rocks of the Bonaparte Basin outcrop at the head and along the western side of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf and extend across the border between Western Australia and the Northern Territory. The Bonaparte Basin is the least known Palaeozoic basin in Australia, due partly to the remoteness of the area and the discouraging results of early coal explorations, and partly to the fact that the stratigraphical extent of the Palaeozoic sequence was only discovered in the last ten years. The Palaeozoic sequence so far established includes Cambrian, Ordovician, Devonian, Carboniferous and Permian sediments which rest on a pre-Cambrian basement and which are overlain in places by a mantle of Lower Cretaceous sediments. The authors intend in this paper to give an account of Carboniferous and Permian sediments of the Basin, as far as present knowledge permits, with briefer mention of the Lower Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sediments of the area.

  • This report is comprised of nine separate sub-reports, referred to as records nos. 1951/3a to 1951/3i. Micropalaeontological examinations were conducted on samples from various localities in the region of Mt. Gambier, South Australia. The results of these examinations, together with any accompanying notes, are recorded in the respective reports.

  • At the invitation of Prof. S.W. Carey, the author visited Tasmania during the period 15th November to 2nd December, 1950, to take part in discussions on Cambrian geology in Tasmania and to learn in the field the results of recent investigations on Tasmanian older Palaeozoic rocks. During the visit the author had the opportunity of expressing his opinions both on newly discovered fossils and on the age of some Palaeozoic units, and the main object of this report is to record these opinions.

  • The purpose of the investigation was to determine the degree of uniformity of the earth's magnetic field over the existing and the alternate compass swinging sites for ground swinging of aircraft. Field work was carried out on 30/1/51 and 5/2/51. Instruments used were the Vertical Force Variometer and the Wingfield Compass. The report gives an account of the field work and the results of the survey.

  • The Government of India invited the Australian Government to send a representative to the celebration of the Centenary of the Geological Survey of India during January 1951. The first meeting of the Pan-Indian Ocean Science Congress was scheduled for the first week in January, 1951 so the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics selected M.A. Condon to attend the Science Congress and the Centenary Celebrations because his work in the North-West Basin of Western Australia would be of some interest to geologists working around the Indian Ocean. This report comprises a detailed itinerary and geological notes on the areas visited during the course of the visit.

  • Three samples of limestone were collected during a geological survey of the Rigo area. One sample is of Upper Cretaceous age and the others of Lower Middle Miocene age. The samples were submitted for micropalaeontological examination. The results of this examination are described here.