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  • <p><b>PLEASE NOTE: These data do not include data over Tasmania. Please see links relevant to that area.</b> <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is a vector representation of the major topographic features appearing on the 1:250,000 scale NATMAPs supplied in MapInfo Tables format and is designed for use in a range of commercial GIS software. Data is arranged within specific themes. All data is based on the GDA94 coordinate system. <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is available as a free download product in Personal Geodatabase, ArcView Shapefile or MapInfo TAB file formats. Each package includes data arranged in ten main themes - cartography, elevation, framework, habitation, hydrography, infrastructure, terrain, transport, utility and vegetation. Data is also available as GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 for Google Earth in kml format for use on Google Earth TM Mapping Service. <p>Product Specifications <p>Themes: Cartography, Elevation, Framework, Habitation, Hydrography, Infrastructure, Terrain, Transport, Utility and Vegetation <p>Coverage: National (Powerlines not available in South Australia) <p>Currency: Data has a currency of less than five years for any location <p>Coordinates: Geographical <p>Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA94) <p>Formats: Personal Geodatabase, kml, Shapefile and MapInfo TAB <p>Release Date: 26 June 2006

  • <p><b>PLEASE NOTE: These data do not include data over Tasmania. Please see links relevant to that area.</b> <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is a vector representation of the major topographic features appearing on the 1:250,000 scale NATMAPs supplied in Personal Geodatabase format and is designed for use in a range of commercial GIS software. Data is arranged within specific themes. All data is based on the GDA94 coordinate system. <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is available as a free download product in Personal Geodatabase, ArcView Shapefile or MapInfo TAB file formats. Each package includes data arranged in ten main themes - cartography, elevation, framework, habitation, hydrography, infrastructure, terrain, transport, utility and vegetation. Data is also available as GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 for Google Earth in kml format for use on Google Earth TM Mapping Service. <p>Product Specifications <p>Themes: Cartography, Elevation, Framework, Habitation, Hydrography, Infrastructure, Terrain, Transport, Utility and Vegetation <p>Coverage: National (Powerlines not available in South Australia) <p>Currency: Data has a currency of less than five years for any location <p>Coordinates: Geographical <p>Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA94) <p>Formats: Personal Geodatabase, kml, Shapefile and MapInfo TAB <p>Release Date: 26 June 2006

  • <p><b>PLEASE NOTE: These data do not include data over Tasmania. Please see links relevant to that area.</b> <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is a vector representation of the major topographic features appearing on the 1:250,000 scale NATMAPs supplied in Shape file format and is designed for use in a range of commercial GIS software. Data is arranged within specific themes. All data is based on the GDA94 coordinate system. <p>GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 is available as a free download product in Personal Geodatabase, ArcView Shapefile or MapInfo TAB file formats. Each package includes data arranged in ten main themes - cartography, elevation, framework, habitation, hydrography, infrastructure, terrain, transport, utility and vegetation. Data is also available as GEODATA TOPO 250K Series 3 for Google Earth in kml format for use on Google Earth TM Mapping Service. <p>Product Specifications <p>Themes: Cartography, Elevation, Framework, Habitation, Hydrography, Infrastructure, Terrain, Transport, Utility and Vegetation <p>Coverage: National (Powerlines not available in South Australia) <p>Currency: Data has a currency of less than five years for any location <p>Coordinates: Geographical <p>Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA94) <p>Formats: Personal Geodatabase, kml, Shapefile and MapInfo TAB <p>Release Date: 26 June 2006

  • Colour brochure about tsunami awareness and what to do in case of a tsunami threat. This pamphlet is produced jointly by Emergency Management Australia, Geoscience Australia and the Bureau of Meteorology.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Webb_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the Webb Gravity survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200660 for the geological survey of WA. The grid has a cell size of 0.0047 degrees (approximately 500m). A total of 4092 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Bowen_Surat_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the Bowen Surat survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200540 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.00764045 degrees (approximately 800m). A total of 4978 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Bowen_Surat_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly_1VD.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the Bowen Surat survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200540 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.00764045 degrees (approximately 800m). A total of 4978 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) process was applied to the original grid to calculate the first vertical derivative grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Webb_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly_1VD.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the Webb Gravity survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200660 for the geological survey of WA. The grid has a cell size of 0.0047 degrees (approximately 500m). A total of 4092 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) process was applied to the original grid to calculate the first vertical derivative grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This East_Arunta_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the East Arunta survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200680 for the geological survey of NT. The grid has a cell size of 0.00375854 degrees (approximately 400m). A total of 5231 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Australia's nickel sulfide industry has had a fluctuating history since the discovery in 1966 of massive sulfides at Kambalda in the Eastern Goldfields of Western Australia. Periods of buoyant nickel prices and high demand, speculative exploration, and frenetic investment (the 'nickel boom' years) have been interspersed by protracted periods of relatively depressed metal prices, exploration inactivity, and low discovery rates. Despite this unpredictable evolution, the industry has had a significant impact on the world nickel scene with Australia having a global resource of nickel metal from sulfide ores of not, vert, similar 12.9 Mt, five world-class deposits (> 1 Mt contained Ni), and a production status of number three after Russia and Canada. More than 90% of the nation's known global resources of nickel metal from sulfide sources were discovered during the relative short period of 1966 to 1973. Australia's nickel sulfide deposits are associated with ultramafic and/or mafic igneous rocks in three major geotectonic settings: (1) Archean komatiites emplaced in rift zones of granite-greenstone belts; (2) Precambrian tholeiitic mafic-ultramafic intrusions emplaced in rift zones of Archean cratons and Proterozoic orogens; and (3) hydrothermal-remobilized deposits of various ages and settings. The komatiitic association is economically by far the most important, accounting for more than 95% of the nation's identified nickel sulfide resources. The ages of Australian komatiitic- and tholeiitic-hosted deposits generally correlate with three major global-scale nickel-metallogenic events at not, vert, similar 3000 Ma, not, vert, similar 2700 Ma, and not, vert, similar 1900 Ma. These events are interpreted to correspond to periods of juvenile crustal growth and the development of large volumes of primitive komatiitic and tholeiitic magmas caused by large-scale mantle overturn and mantle plume activities. There is considerable potential for the further discovery of komatiite-hosted deposits in Archean granite-greenstone terranes including both large, and smaller high-grade (5 to 9% Ni) deposits, that may be enriched in PGEs (2 to 5 g/t), especially where the host ultramafic sequences are poorly exposed. Analysis of the major komatiite provinces of the world reveals that fertile komatiitic sequences are generally of late Archean (not, vert, similar 2700 Ma) or Paleoproterozoic (not, vert, similar 1900 Ma) age, have dominantly Al-undepleted (Al2O3/TiO2 = 15 to 25) chemical affinities, and often occur with sulfur-bearing country rocks in dynamic high-magma-flux environments, such as compound sheet flows with internal pathways facies (Kambalda-type) or dunitic compound sheet flow facies (Mt Keith-type). Most Precambrian provinces in Australia, particularly the Proterozoic orogenic belts, contain an abundance of sulfur-saturated tholeiitic mafic ± ultramafic intrusions that have not been fully investigated for their potential to host basal Ni-Cu sulfides (Voisey's Bay-type mineralization). The major exploration challenges for finding these deposits are to determine the pre-deformational geometries and younging directions of the intrusions, and to locate structural depressions in the basal contacts and feeder conduits under cover. Stratabound PGE-Ni-Cu ± Cr deposits hosted by large Archean-Proterozoic layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions (Munni Munni, Panton) of tholeiitic affinity have comparable global nickel resources to many komatiite deposits, but low-grades (< 0.2% Ni). There are also hydrothermal nickel sulfide deposits, including the unusual Avebury deposit in western Tasmania, and some potential for 'Noril'sk-type' Ni-Cu-PGE deposits associated with major flood basaltic provinces in western and northern Australia.