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  • <p>The pmd*CRC Y2 project operated for a little over three years, and in this time has more than met its goal and deliverables. This final report brings together a vast wealth of new knowledge, information and data, and is accompanied by a comprehensive DVD with all the source and derivative data, various presentations, papers, animations and posters etc. <p>At the start of the project the Y2 team was inexperienced in building 3D maps, and the early attempts were relatively crude and clumsy. Now, after more than three years of learning and testing, the project team has achieved an excellent result and methodology for building rigorous 3D maps. The main achievement of the Y2 project has been the building of comprehensive 3D maps of Kalgoorlie-Kambalda and the Norseman-Wiluna region. The maps were built on a foundation of 2D solid geology maps from government agencies, universities and industry. These data were integrated with various geophysical data sets (seismic reflection, refraction, broadband recording, receiver function, gravity and magnetic data, plus various derivatives such as 'worms'), geochemical data sets (e.g., from P624), and geochronological data sets (from AMIRA P624 and earlier projects as well as published data). <p>The result of this integration is a more-holistic understanding of the EYC from a five questions approach. This understanding is outlined both in the maps and associated data sets, as well as this final report. The Y2 project has had its principal impact on answering the architecture question (Q2). The project has contributed to the geodynamics (Q1), drivers and pathways (Q3), fluids and their sources/reservoirs (Q4), and metal transport and deposition (Q5) questions. <p>The report is structured around the six key deliverables. Chapter 1 sets the geological scene and defines the tectono-stratigraphic nomenclature used throughout. Chapter 2 describes the work flow process devised to build the 3D maps. Chapter 3 discusses the seismic reflection and wide-angle reflection data and interpretations. Chapter 4 incorporates the mapping of the lithosphere and its velocity structure by using broadband seismic recording (tomography) and receiver function data (velocity profiles). Chapter 5 concerns the mapping of the chalcophile elements. Chapter 6 assesses the utility of 3D as opposed to 2D methodology, and discusses the structural history. Chapter 7 is a brief outline of the prospectivity analysis conducted by the pmd*CRC A1 project using Y2 project data. Chapter 8 is a synthesis chapter arranged by the five questions. Many of the new ideas and understanding built on the data and observations of the earlier chapters are developed. Chapter 9 has the project conclusions. Chapter 10 presents the scope of the next phase of the CRC as recommendations for future work. Extensive appendices (available only in the pdf file [DVD]) follow each chapter, including all pertinent publications and deliverables. <p>Acknowledgements as well as an outline of all data sources and intellectual property, and references complete the report. <p>Many authors contributed; Blewett and Hitchman edited the volume.

  • Gravity data measure small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data are collected on geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • Total magnetic intensity data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic filed caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • Full-colour map summarises the major Proterozoic mafic-ultramafic magmatic events in Western Australia. Fifteen events are recognised with four of these (~2420 Ma, ~1850 Ma, ~1300 Ma,~1070 Ma) mineralised (Ni, Cu, Co, PGEs, Ti-V). Inset maps show the distribution of Proterozoic and Archaean rocks, mineral commodities, large igneous provinces, and geochronological data that underpins the main map. Geological Map (1:3,500,000 Scale)

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • Digital Elevation Model data record the terrain height variations from the processed point-located data recorded on an airborne geophysical survey.  The aircraft altimeter data records the height of the aircraft above the ground and the aircraft GPS records the height of the aircraft above the ellipsoid.  Subtracting the two values enables the height of the terrain beneath the aircraft relative to the ellipsoid to be calculated.  This ellipsoidal terrain height is corrected for the variation between the ellipsoid and the geoid (the n-value correction) to produce terrain heights relative to sea level.

  • Total magnetic intensity data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic filed caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • Total magnetic intensity data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic filed caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State & NT Governments and the private sector.