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  • A symposium was held at the University of Wales, Swansea in July 2007 to honour the career and achievements of Professor Michael Collins. The symposium was organised by Michael's former postgraduate students as a tribute to his contributions over the past 30 years as a scientist, teacher, mentor and friend. About 30 of the 50+ Ph.D. and M.Sc. students that Michael has supervised over the years were fortunate to attend the symposium, which offered the opportunity for all of us to learn about the many different subjects and projects that Michael supervised and to renew our friendships with the Collins family, as well as the extended, academic Collins 'family'.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Cooper_Basin_North_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly_geodetic.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the Cooper Basin North Gravity Survey, Queensland 2007 survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200701 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.0075 degrees (approximately 800m). A total of 3556 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This p200750_PACE_Northern_Olympic_Domain_Gravity_slab_Bouguer.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the 2007 PACE Northern Olympic Domain Gravity Survey, SA survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200750 for the geological survey of SA. The grid has a cell size of 0.00185 degrees (approximately 190m). A total of 38877 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • Package holding all available processed data and well completion reports relevant to the Carnarvon 2007Acreage Release in workstation format - Geoframe, Kingdom and Landmark.

  • Work at the Bureau of Mineral Resources (now Geoscience Australia) in the early 1990s was instrumental in bringing hot rocks geothermal research and development to Australia. The Energy Initiative of the Federal Government, announced in August 2006, has restarted a geothermal project in GA. This paper outlines the scope of the Onshore Energy Security Program, the development and implementation of the new Geothermal Energy Project, and progress to date. The Onshore Energy Security Program A program to acquire pre-competitive geoscience information for onshore energy prospects has begun following the Prime Minister's Energy Security Initiative. The initiative provides $58.9 million over five years to Geoscience Australia for the acquisition of new seismic, gravity, geochemistry, heat flow, radiometric, magneto-telluric and airborne electromagnetic (EM) data to attract investment in exploration for onshore petroleum, geothermal, uranium and thorium energy sources. The program will be delivered in collaboration with the States and Territory under the existing National Geoscience Agreement. A set of principles have been developed to guide the program. According to the principles, proposed work must: promote exploration for energy-related resources, especially in greenfields areas; improve discovery rates for energy-related resources; be of national and/or strategic importance; and data acquisition must be driven by science. The program is structured with national-scale projects for each energy commodity (geothermal, petroleum, uranium and thorium) and for geophysical and geochemical acquisition. Regional scale projects in Georgetown-Isa, Gawler-Curnamona, Northern WA and the Northern Territory areas will assess the energy potential of those areas in detail. Other regions will be prioritised at a later stage of the OESP. Formulating the Geoscience Australia Geothermal Energy Project Based on consultation with State and Territory geological surveys and geothermal exploration companies, a list of the impediments faced by geothermal companies was identified. The Geothermal Energy Project addresses those that require geoscience input. The greatest geological problem facing explorers is a lack of understanding of the distribution of temperature in the upper crust of Australia. The two existing datasets that map temperature and heat distribution - the Austherm map of temperature at 5 km depth, and a database of heat flow measurements - both require a great deal of infilling. It is also possible to make predictive maps of expected heat based on geological models. These three ways of mapping heat, and the work that the project will do in each of these areas, is described in more detail in later sections. Other geoscience inputs that will help improve discovery rates and/or reduce risk to explorers and investors include a comprehensive and accessible geothermal geoscience information system, a better understanding of the stress state of the Australian crust, better access to seismic monitors during reservoir stimulation, and a Reserve & Resource definition scheme. Increasing the awareness of Australia's geothermal potential amongst decision makers and the general public may also help the funding of the development of the industry through Government support and investor confidence. The Geothermal Project has involvement in all of these activities, as outlined in later sections.

  • This invited keynote address was presented at the Sixth International Hutton Symposium, Origin of granites and related rocks, held at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, on 2-6 July, 2007. Felsic magmatism in Australia ranges in age from Paleoarchean to Mesozoic. Extensive episodes occurred in the Paleo-, Meso-, and Neoarchean, Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, and Silurian-Devonian, and Carboniferous-Permian. Like the Archean elsewhere, the Archean Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons in Western Australia are dominated by sodic felsic granites of the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite. This earliest magmatism reflects melting of a basaltic protolith, mostly at high pressures, either within subducted slabs or thickened crust. Sodic granites also form a persistent component of Proterozoic and Palaeozoic magmatism in Australia although in no specific period are they found in the same abundance as for the Archean. The other dominant magmatic series in the Australian Archean are potassic granites. These mostly postdate and largely reflect crustal reworking of the sodic granites. An important sub-class are those with high-silica and often moderately to strongly differentiated compositions. These first appear in the Mesoarchean, but are most extensive in the Neoarchean of the Yilgarn Craton (>100,000 square kilometres within a 25 million year period). Similar high-silica rocks occur in both the Proterozoic and Palaeozoic. Tectonic environments for these rocks are not well understood. One feature of these rocks is elevated thorium (Th) and uranium (U) contents. A wide variety of other (intermediate-) felsic magmatic rocks are present in the Archean to Palaeozoic geological provinces of Australia. These include: high-Mg diorite as well as components of the basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite series (locally with boninite-like rocks), which provide strong evidence for modern-style arc-related processes as far back as the Mesoarchean; peralkaline rocks such as syenites (as old as Mesoarchean); and high temperature, Fe- and HFSE-rich rocks, i.e., A-types (as old as Paleoarchean). Perhaps the most significant secular change in Australia is for S-type magmatism, which is rare in the Archean, minor in the Proterozoic, and common in the Palaeozoic. The Australian record shows that, in general, none of the felsic magmatic series are confined to or excluded from any particular time, but rather it is the relative proportions of such rocks which vary with time. Although similar chemistries could reflect similar responses to different processes, the simplest interpretation is that they reflect similar processes. A corollary is that a similar range of tectonic processes has operated from the Paleoarchean to now, but the dominance of particular processes has changed. This conclusion is balanced against observed subtle changes in chemistry which may indicate secular changes in tectonic processes, e.g., slab melting (TTGs) to slab dehydration (calc-alkaline rocks).

  • Australian mineral exploration spending in 2005-06 rose by 20.6% to a record $1240.7 million, 36.9% of which was spent on the search for new deposits. Western Australia dominated with 47.6% of Australian mineral exploration spending while South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland had record expenditure. Tasmanian spending rose by 172%. Gold remained the main target, but its share of spending was eroded by growth in nickel, copper, iron ore, coal and uranium exploration. Exploration results were announced for a wide range of commodities from across the country including: Mineral sands (Gullivers, South Australia, and Cooljarloo North, Western Australia) Nickel (Saxon, Tasmania) Gold-copper (Tekapo, Northern Territory) Gold (Tandarra, Victoria, and Tropicana, Western Australia) Base metals (Cuttaburra, New South Wales) Copper (Rocklands, Queensland)

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Mt_Isa_D_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly_1VD_geodetic.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the Mt Isa Area D Gravity survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200643 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.0075 degrees (approximately 790m). A total of 4822 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) process was applied to the original grid to calculate the first vertical derivative grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This p200750_PACE_Northern_Olympic_Domain_Gravity_slab_Bouguer_1vd.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the 2007 PACE Northern Olympic Domain Gravity Survey, SA survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200750 for the geological survey of SA. The grid has a cell size of 0.00185 degrees (approximately 190m). A total of 38877 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) process was applied to the original grid to calculate the first vertical derivative grid.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Mt_Isa_E_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Anomaly_geodetic.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the Mt Isa Area E Gravity survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200644 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.0075 degrees (approximately 800m). A total of 6124 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.