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  • The Marine Survey Multibeam Bathymetry Web Map Service contains the highest-resolution multibeam bathymetry grids available for download on Geoscience Australia's website. These bathymetry grids were collected over numerous multibeam survey programs conducted in Australian mainland and Antarctic waters by both Geoscience Australia and our collaborators. Layers are grouped by survey or region and where available include both the Geoscience Australia and vessel survey identification numbers that contributed to the bathymetry grids. Bathymetry grids have been rendered over a rainbow colour-ramp with minimum and maximum depth values unique for each survey. These values are specified in each survey's layer description. The resolution of each bathymetry grid is also specified in each survey's layer description

  • Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS) are used to directly detect the processes of hydrocarbon generation in the 10 nm to 10 μm size pores in carbonate and siliciclastic rocks which contain no land-plant material suitable for conventional maturity determination by vitrinite reflectance. The method takes advantage of the pore-size-specific variation of neutron scattering contrast between the solid rock matrix and pore-space content with depth, which is caused by thermal maturation of organic matter through the oil and gas generation windows. SANS and USANS measurements were performed on bedding plane-orientated core slices, extracted from a series of 10 to 12 depth intervals for three wells, CKAD0001, MacIntyre 1 and Baldwin 1 in the southern Georgina Basin, central Australia. The depth intervals, intersecting the organic-rich basal ‘hot’ shales of the middle Cambrian Arthur Creek Formation, were selected based on Rock-Eval pyrolysis data. SANS and USANS results indicate that oil generation has occurred in the past in nano-sized pores in rocks that are now at depths of around 538.4 m in CKAD0001 and 799.3 m in MacIntyre 1. Furthermore, in the CKAD0001 well, the oil-wet pores extend into the larger pore-size range (at least up to 10 μm) due to the efficient expulsion of oil. At around 880 m in Baldwin 1, the influence of pyrobitumen reverts pore space from gas wet to oil wet. These hydrocarbons have remained in situ since the Devonian when the Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic section was exhumed in the Alice Springs Orogeny and subsequently eroded, preserving only remnants of the once extensive basin sediments.

  • Magnetotelluric (MT) measures the natural variations of the Earth's magnetic and electrical (telluric) fields. The Audio-Magnetotelluric method (AMT) samples signals in the frequency range of 10k Hz down to ~1Hz and provides information to the upper few kilometres of the crust. AMT data were collected at ten sites in the southern Thomson Orogen using Phoenix Geophysics equipment (MTU-5A, MTC-150L and PE5 electrodes). Instrument deployment periods were 7/Oct -29/Oct 2015 and 03/Aug-10/Aug 2016. Time series data were processed into frequency domain using remote reference and Robust Processing scheme. After quality assurance, processed data were exported to industry-standard EDI files. Time series data are available on request.

  • The product consists of 8,800 line kilometres of time‐domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) geophysical data acquired over the far north part of South Australia known as the Musgrave Province. This product release includes: a) the measured AEM point located data, b) electrical conductivity depth images derived from the dataset, and c) the acquisition and processing report. The data were acquired using the airborne SkyTEM312 Dual Moment 275Hz/25Hz electromagnetic and magnetic system, which covered a survey area of ~14,000 km2, which includes the standard 1:250 000 map sheets of SG52-12 (Woodroffe), SG52-16 (Lindsay), SG53-09 (Alberga) and SG53-13 (Everard). The survey lines where oriented N-S and flown at 2km, 500m and 250m line spacing. A locality diagram for the survey is shown in Figure 1. This survey was funded by the Government of South Australia, as part of the Plan for Accelerating Exploration (PACE) Copper Initiative, through the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, (DPC) and the Goyder Institute of Water Research. Geoscience Australia managed the survey as part of a National Collaborative Framework project agreement with SA. The principal objective of this project was to capture a baseline geoscientific dataset to provide further information on the geological context and setting of the area for mineral systems as well as potential for groundwater resources, of the central part of the South Australian Musgrave Province. Geoscience Australia contracted SkyTEM (Australia) Pty. Ltd. to acquire SkyTEM312 electromagnetic data, between September and October 2016. The data were processed and inverted by SkyTEM using the AarhusInv inversion program (Auken et al., 2015) and the Aarhus Workbench Laterally Constrained Inversion (LCI) algorithm (Auken et al. 2005; Auken et al. 2002). The LCI code was run in multi-layer, smooth-model mode. In this mode the layer thicknesses are kept fixed and the data are inverted only for the resistivity of each layer. For this survey a 30 layer model was used. The thickness of the topmost layer was set to 2 m and the depth to the top of the bottommost (half-space) layer was set to 600 m. The layer thicknesses increase logarithmically with depth. The thicknesses and depths to the top of each layer are given in Table 1. The regional AEM survey data can be used to inform the distribution of cover sequences, and at a reconnaissance scale, trends in regolith thickness and variability, variations in bedrock conductivity, and conductivity values of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover. The data will also assist in assessing groundwater resource potential and the extent of palaeovalley systems known to exist in the Musgrave Province. A considerable area of the survey data has a small amplitude response due to resistive ground. It very soon becomes evident that lack of signal translates to erratic non-monotonic decays, quite opposite to the smooth transitional exponential decays that occur in conductive ground. Some sections of the data have been flown over what appears to be chargeable ground, hence contain what potentially can be identified as an Induced Polarization effect (airborne IP—AIP). For decades these decay sign changes, which characterize AIP, have not been accounted for in conventional AEM data processing and modelling (Viezzoli et al., 2017). Instead they have mostly been regarded as noise, calibration or levelling issues and are dealt with by smoothing, culling or applying DC shifts to the data. Not accounting for these effects is notable on the contractor’s conductivity-depth sections, where data can’t be modelled to fit the data hence large areas of blank-space have been used to substitute the conductivity structure. The selection of the survey area was undertaken through a consultative process involving the CSIRO, GOYDER Institute, Geological Survey of South Australia and the exploration companies currently active in the region (including industry survey partner PepinNini Minerals Ltd). The data will be available from Geoscience Australia’s web site free of charge. It will also be available through the South Australian Government’s SARIG website at https://map.sarig.sa.gov.au. The data will feed into the precompetitive exploration workflow developed and executed by the Geological Survey of South Australia (GSSA) and inform a new suite of value-added products directed at the exploration community.

  • <p>This resource contains multibeam bathymetry data for Bynoe Harbour collected by Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Northern Territory Government (Department of Environment and Natural Resources) during the period between 3 and 27 May 2016 on the RV Solander (survey SOL6432/GA04452). This project was made possible through offset funds provided by INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project to Northern Territory Government Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and co-investment from Geoscience Australia and Australian Institute of Marine Science. The intent of this four year (2014-2018) program is to improve knowledge of the marine environments in the Darwin and Bynoe Harbour regions by collating and collecting baseline data that enable the creation of thematic habitat maps that underpin marine resource management decisions. <p>The specific objectives of the survey were to: <p>1. Obtain high resolution geophysical (bathymetry) data for Bynoe Harbour; <p>2. Characterise substrates (acoustic backscatter properties, grainsize, sediment chemistry) for Bynoe Harbour; and <p>3. Collect tidal data for the survey area. Data acquired during the survey included: multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; physical samples of seabed sediments, underwater photography and video of grab sample locations and oceanographic information including tidal data and sound velocity profiles. <p>This dataset comprises multibeam bathymetry data. A detailed account of the survey is provided in: Siwabessy, P.J.W., Smit, N., Atkinson, I., Dando, N., Harries, S., Howard, F.J.F., Li, J., Nicholas W.A., Picard, K., Radke, L.C., Tran, M., Williams, D. and Whiteway, T. 2016. Bynoe Harbour Marine Survey 2016: GA4452/SOL6432 – Post-survey report. Record 2017/04. Geoscience Australia, Canberra. http://dx.doi.org/10.11636/Record.2017.004.

  • The Antarctic field notebooks contain the geological observations recorded by Bureau of Mineral Resources geologists during their trips to Antarctica between 1948 – 1980s. Files include a scanned copy of the original handwritten field notebook, transcription of the notebook’s contents transcribed by volunteers and validated by an experienced geologist, and a csv file of the transcription with Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) tags. The original Antarctic field notebooks are held at the N.H. (Doc) Fisher Geoscience Library at Geoscience Australia, Canberra.

  • New 2D seismic data, acquired by Geoscience Australia in the northern Houtman Sub-basin of the Perth Basin, provides important information on the prospectivity of this frontier area. To date, lack of quality seismic data and limited geological understanding led to the perception that the hydrocarbon potential of the area is very low. However, interpretation of the newly collected data suggests that the northern Houtman depocentre contains up to 15 km of pre-breakup sediments composed of Permian, Triassic and Jurassic successions, which potentially contain multiple source rock, reservoir and seal intervals. The Permian synrift succession is confined to a series of large half-graben that are controlled by basement-involved faults separating the Houtman depocentre from the Bernier Platform. This succession is up to 10 km thick and is mapped throughout the inboard part of the new seismic grid. A prominent unconformity at the top of the Permian synrift sequence is overlain by a thick (up to 1800 m) and regionally extensive Kockatea Shale sequence, which has been tied to the regional interpretation of the basin. The thickness of the overlying Triassic succession ranges from about 1 km in the inboard part of the basin to up to 5 km further outboard. The Jurassic succession is thickest (up to 4 km) in the outboard part of the basin and is interpreted to contain sequences corresponding to the Cattamarra, Cadda and Yarragadee formations. Our study integrates new results from regional mapping, geophysical modelling and petroleum systems analysis, which enables a more accurate prospectivity assessment of this frontier basin.

  • Junior students can get a taste for what it was like for scientists living in Antarctica with our code breaker earth science week activity (labelled Primary). Crack the code and send messages home using the unique WYSSA code used by Antarctic scientists. Senior students can get a modern take on science in Antarctic by studying an Antarctic sediment core (labelled Senior Secondary). The set also includes Teacher Notes with instructions and suggested answers.

  • AUSIMAGE Aerial Imagery Canberra 2014 is a web service of high resolution aerial imagery (10 cm to 18 cm) over Canberra and Queanbeyan, acquired in February and April 2014. AUSIMAGE Aerial Imagery is a data product of Jacobs Group (Australia) Pty Ltd, released by Geoscience Australia as a web map service under license agreement.

  • AUSIMAGE Aerial Imagery Canberra 2014 is a web service of high resolution aerial imagery (10 cm to 18 cm) over Canberra and Queanbeyan, acquired in February and April 2014. AUSIMAGE Aerial Imagery is a data product of Jacobs Group (Australia) Pty Ltd, released by Geoscience Australia as a web map service under license agreement.