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  • The geothermal industry has expanded rapidly in Australia, with 48 companies holding 385 license areas as of August 2009, with 10 listed on the ASX and with work programs excluding upscaling valued at ~AU$1.5B to 2013. Projects range from early to advanced exploration, proof-of-concept and pilot stages. Targets are for Hot Rock and Hot Sedimentary Aquifer resources, for the purposes of electricity generation or direct use applications. Ground source heat pump technology continues to struggle to attain the recognition it deserves.

  • Shared geological and geochemical processes are involved in the formation of particular groups of uranium deposits. Three families of uranium mineral systems are recognised: magmatic-, metamorphic- and basin-related. End-member fluids in each family are magmatic-hydrothermal, 'metamorphic' (including fluids reacted with metamorphic rocks at elevated temperatures), and surficial fluids such as meteoric water, lake water and seawater. Most well known uranium deposit types can be accommodated within this tripartite framework, which explicitly allows for hybrid deposit types.

  • The purpose of this review is to assess the existing published information relating to groundwater quality in Australia and New Zealand.

  • Australia's mineral resources are an important component of its wealth, and a long term perspective of what is likely to be available for mining is a prerequisite for formulating sound policies on resources and land-access. The national resource stocks are quantified in the annual online publication: Australia's Identified Mineral Resources: http://www.australianminesatlas.gov.au/aimr/index.jsp, which provides Geoscience Australia's assessments based on its national mineral resource classification system. This paper summarises Australia's national classification system for Identified Mineral Resources. Estimating global stocks of mineral and energy commodities is becoming increasingly important. This requires mapping of categories between the various the mineral and energy classification systems in use, and rationalising these systems where feasible. This paper also outlines how Australia's national system correlates with other mineral and energy resource classification systems.

  • This map shows the boundary of the Maritime Security Zones for each port for the purpose of the Maritime Transport & Office Security Act 2003. 3 sheets (Colour) October 2009 Not for sale or public distribution Contact Manager LOSAMBA project, PMD

  • This map shows the boundary of the Maritime Security Zone for each port for the purpose of the Maritime Transport & Office Security Act 2003. 1 sheet (Colour) June 2009 Not for sale or public distribution Contact Manager LOSAMBA project

  • This map shows the boundary of the Maritime Security Zones for each port for the purpose of the Maritime Transport & Office Security Act 2003. 1 sheet (Colour) August 2009 Not for sale or public distribution Contact Manager LOSAMBA project, PMD

  • New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages and Sm-Nd isotopic results identify early Mesoarchean (~3150 Ma) granitic crust outcropping in the eastern Gawler Craton. These rocks are more than half a billion years older than the oldest previously dated rocks from the Gawler Craton, and challenge the view that pre-3.0 Ga crust in Australia is restricted to the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons. We interpret these new data to indicate the presence of ~3150 Ma crust at or near the surface throughout a wedge-shaped region covering an area of at least ~1500 km2. The region is characterised by high surface heat flow, and contains Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic intrusive rocks with evolved Nd isotopic compositions and high radiogenic heat production values. The newly identified Mesoarchean rocks provide an obvious source for the evolved Nd signatures, and are themselves relatively enriched in heat producing elements, particularly considering their age. We speculate that the presence of relatively radiogenic Mesoarchean crust underlies much of the South Australian Heat Flow Anomaly. Identification of Mesoarchean crust near the eastern margin of the Gawler Craton prompts consideration of links with other Australian cratonic elements. As far as we are aware no direct age equivalents of these rocks have been identified elsewhere in Australia, although we note that some recent models for Australian Proterozoic geodynamic evolution may be used to predict the presence of equivalent aged crust in the North Australian Craton.

  • This map shows the boundary of the security regulated port for the purpose of the Maritime Transport & Office Security Act 2003. 8 sheets (Colour) October 2009 Not for sale or public distribution Contact Manager LOSAMBA project, PMD

  • In addition to typical VHMS deposits, the ~3240 Ma Panorama district contains contemporaneous greisen- and vein-hosted Mo-Cu-Zn-Sn mineral occurrences that are hosted by the Strelley granite complex, which drove VHMS circulation, making this district a natural laboratory to assess the role of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in VHMS hydrothermal systems. High-temperature alteration zones in volcanic rocks below the VHMS deposits are dominated by quartz-chlorite±albite assemblages, with lesser quartz-sericite±K-feldspar assemblages, typical of VHMS systems. In contrast, the assemblages associated with granite-hosted greisens and veins, which do not extend into the overlying volcanic pile, include quartz-topaz-muscovite-fluorite and quartz-muscovite(sericite)-chlorite-ankerite. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope data suggest that the greisens formed from high temperature (~590°C), high salinity (38-56 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids with high densities (>1.3 g/cm3) and high -18O (9.3±0.6-). These fluids are compatible with the characteristics of magmatic fluids evolved from the Strelley granite complex. Fluids in the volcanic pile (including the VHMS ore-forming fluids) were of lower temperature (90-270°C), lower salinity (5.0-11.2 wt % NaCl equiv), with lower densities (0.88-1.01 g/cm3) and lower -18O (-0.8±2.6-), compatible with evolved Paleoarchean seawater. Fluids that formed quartz-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-cassiterite veins, which are present within the granite complex near the contact with the volcanic pile, had intermediate in temperature and isotopic compositions (T = 240-315°C; -18O = 4.3±1.5-) and likely indicate mixing between the two end-member fluids. Evidence of mixing between evolved seawater and magmatic-hydrothermal fluid within the granite complex, together with the lack of evidence for a magmatic component in fluids from the volcanic pile, suggest partitioning of magmatic-hydrothermal from evolved seawater hydrothermal systems in the Panorama system.