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  • This data set was compiled to provide geological context for the 2001 seismic reflection line acquired between Leonora and the northwest Neale 1:250 000 sheet. The data set includes reviewed solid geology for the Leonora (Blewett) and Laverton (Whitaker) 1:250 000 sheets but also includes 1:100 000 sheets for northeast Menzies and northern Edjudina 1:250 000 sheet areas as well as aeromagnetic interpretation of the Rason and Neale 1:250 000 sheets. Archaean rocks of the Eastern Goldfields Province of the Yilgarn Craton form basement to the area traversed in the seismic survey. In the west, granite and abundant greenstone of the Norseman-Wiluna Belt are dislocated by major north-northwest to north oriented shear zones. East of the Norseman-Wiluna Belt, the crust is dominated by granitic lithologies with shear zones and greenstone in much lower abundance. Gneiss of the Proterozoic Albany-Fraser Province abuts the Yilgarn Craton about 50 km to the east of the eastern end of the seismic line.

  • Ratio U2/Th - Ratio of U2 over Th derived from the filtered U and Th grids, units: dimensionless The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • Ratio of U over K derived from the filtered U and K grids, units: dimensionless The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • Low-pass filtered U element concentrations, units: ppm eU The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • <p>Low-pass filtered K element concentrations, units: % K <p>The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). <p>Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. <p>Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. <p>Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). <p>Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. <p>Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds <p>File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • This image is unfiltered thorium (Th element concentrations, units: ppm eTh) The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • This image is unfiltered uranium (U element concentrations, units: ppm eU) The Radiometric Map of Australia dataset comprises grids of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th) element concentrations, and derivatives of these grids. The third edition was derived by seamlessly merging 45 new survey grids with the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia (Minty et al., 2010). Details of the specifications of individual airborne surveys can be found in the Fourteenth Edition of the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (Percival, 2014), which is included with the grid as a PDF document. This Index is also available online at http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/79134. Further up to date information about individual surveys can also be obtained online from the Airborne Surveys Database at http://www.ga.gov.au/oracle/argus/. Matching of the grids in the database was achieved using a program called Gridmerge, which was originally developed within Geoscience Australia and has now been commercialised. This program was used to merge 45 new surveys to the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia. The second edition merged over 550 individual grids to create the compilation (Minty et al., 2009) and the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne radiometric data was used to control the base levels of those survey grids which overlapped the AWAGS data (Milligan et al., 2009). As the second edition was used as a base grid for the Gridmerge operation the new Third Edition is essentially levelled to AWAGS. Cell sizes: The cell sizes of the original survey grids range from 50 m through 800 m, but most have a cell size of about 100 m. The 45 original survey grids were levelled and then re-sampled, using Newton 4th Order local operator onto the Second Edition Radiometric Map of Australia Grids with a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees). Filtering: Potassium, uranium, thorium and dose rate grid are available in both filtered and unfiltered versions. The low-pass filtering was achieved by applying a 7-point, degree-3 Savitzky-Golay filter (Savitzky & Golay, 1964) to each of the original survey grids prior to grid merging. Projections and Datums: The grids are stored as geodetic grids based on the GDA94 datum, but can be re-projected prior to downloading. Grid downloads: The Radiometric Map of Australia grids can be downloaded using the Geophysical Archive Data Delivery System (GADDS) on the Australian Government's Geoscience Portal at http://www.geoscience.gov.au/gadds File sizes: At full resolution, each Radiometric Map of Australia grid has 34761 rows and 40954 columns. Each grid has a file size of approximately 5.3 Gb in ERMapper format. Note that, because of the file sizes, GADDS will not allow users to do download the grids at full resolution. Users wishing to access the grids at full resolution should contact Geoscience Australia to make arrangements to have the data supplied on a portable hard drive.

  • Bowen & Surat Basins B40 reflector structure contour map 1:500 000

  • The map of iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) potential of the Gawler Craton, South Australia, shows the spatial distribution of key 'essential ingredients' of IOCG ore-forming systems. These 'ingredients' include: (a) rock units of the Gawler Range-Hiltaba Volcano-Plutonic Association, subdivided by supersuite; (b) faults/shear zones subdivided by interpreted age of youngest significant movement; (c) copper geochemistry (>200ppm), from drill holes intersecting crystalline basement (Mesoproterozoic and older); (d) hydrothermal alteration assemblages and zones, based on drill hole logging, potential-field interpretation, and inversion modelling of potential-field data; and (e) host sequence units considered important in localising IOCG alteration and mineralisation. Also shown are Nd isotopic data and the mineral isotopic ages of late Palaeoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic magmatism and hydrothermal minerals. Areas with the greatest number of 'essential ingredients' are considered to have the maximum potential for IOCG mineralisation. IOCG potential of the Gawler Craton is shown as domains with ranks from 1 to 4, with 1 being the highest rank. Notes detailing the sources of data and methods used in constructing the map are provided in a separate file available on the Geoscience Australia website.

  • The Pine Creek GIS package has been prepared jointly by AGSO and the Northern Territory Survey for release in both digital and hard copy (atlas) formats. Based on the 1:500 000 geological map of the Pine Creek Geosyncline (2nd edition) published by BMR in 1984, the GIS has been supplemented where possible by recently acquired data from mapping in the Litchfield, Katherine, and South Alligator areas. The aim of this project was to bring together almost 45 years of regional mapping projects by both organisations by integrating existing hard copy geological maps and other relevant geoscientific data into a digital Metallogenic Geographic Information System (GIS).