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  • Presentation slides and speaking notes are provided for a presentation that was given online on Wednesday 7th October 2020, 11:00 to 12:00 AEDT time (UTC +11). The presentation coincided with the release of two products; (1) a new web page for the Australian Fundamental Gravity Network (AFGN), and (2) the 2019 Australian National Gravity Grids (eCat Record 133023). Not mentioned as a separate item, the presentation drew heavily on material in the Explanatory Notes for the gravity grids (eCat Record 144233) which was also released on this day. The presentation was pitched at the level of a general audience. It commenced with an introduction to gravity, and how it changes from one place to another in step with different geological units. The subjects of 2-dimensional digital grids and how coloured images are derived from them were then covered as a prelude to later material. The speakers then described first of the two main topics - the Australian Fundamental Gravity Network (AFGN) and its importance when producing the 2019 Australian National Gravity Grids. The AFGN is a series of gravity benchmarks that allow gravity surveys to be linked to the Australian Absolute Gravity Datum 2007 (AAGD07). This makes it possible for the many separate gravity data sets that have been acquired in Australia to be combined into a seamless whole. Gravity data from 1308 ground surveys and 14 blocks of airborne gravity and airborne gravity gradiometry have been combined with offshore gravity data from satellite altimetry to form the 2019 Australian National Gravity Grids. This marks the first time that airborne data have been incorporated into the national gravity grids. It is also the first time that the offshore data have been fully processed alongside the onshore data. Grids of three types of gravity anomalies were produced; Free Air Anomaly (FAA), Complete Bouguer Anomaly (CBA), and De-trended Global Isostatic Residual (DGIR). During the presentation, various comparisons were made illustrating the improvements made with the 2019 grids in comparison with the previous 2016 grids and the benefits of incorporating airborne data into the grids. The gravity grids were produced to assist those involved in geological mapping and exploration, and it is hoped that the new grids will inspire users to revisit their geological interpretations and to aid explorers to identify new opportunities and to more efficiently focus their efforts on prospective ground. The presentation was recorded, and the recording of the presentation is available on demand on the Geoscience Australia YouTube Channel at https://youtu.be/3CyqrqBM0xg. Introductions were made by Marina Costelloe. The event was controlled by Chris Nelson, and the recording was edited by Douglas Warouw. Note that there are some minor differences between the presentation material given here and the presentation seen in the video recording. These changes were made in the interest of clarity and include the removal of “animation” effects and the provision of some additional text. Speaker Biography for Richard Lane; Richard joined Geoscience Australia in 2001 after a career as a mineral and petroleum geophysicist with CRA Exploration / Rio Tinto and as the Program Leader responsible for the development of the TEMPEST AEM system in CRC AMET. As a Senior Geophysicist in the Geophysical Acquisition and Processing Section, he has been evaluating the role of airborne gravity and airborne gravity gradiometry on a national scale. He is an ASEG Gold Medal recipient, a Society of Exploration Geophysicists Honorary Lecturer, and a Distinguished Geoscience Australia Lecturer. Speaker Biography for Phillip Wynne; Phillip has been with GA for over twenty years. In that time, he has been involved in all aspects of regional gravity surveys. He currently oversees gravity surveys conducted by GA and Australian States and Territories and manages the Australian Fundamental Gravity Network.

  • Australia has a thriving oil and gas industry with expanding infrastructure and many exploration opportunities. Geologically the country contains potential for large oil and gas discoveries with extensive sedimentary basins. Australia is also one of the world leaders in providing low cost geological data with an open Acreage Release process and competitive taxation regimes. Politically Australia is very stable with a very high standard of living and a long-standing democratic culture based on the rights of the individual and the rule of the law. There is a free market philosophy which welcomes foreign investment - Australia has no mandatory local equity requirements and has no government owned oil companies. Government facilitation of investment includes fast-tracking of approvals processes for major projects. This CD provides some basic Australia data including: Oil and Gas Resources of Australia 2003 This publication is the definitive reference on exploration, development and production of Australia's petroleum resources. It covers exploration, reserves, undiscovered resources, development, coalbed methane resources, production, crude oil and shale oil and supporting information and statistics. It includes a forecast of Australia's crude oil and condensate production up to the year 2020, and sustainability indicators for petroleum resources. Information on Australia's petroleum data availability is also included. An estimate of Australia's undiscovered oil and gas potential and a review of geological sequestration of carbon dioxide in Australia is included. Australian Research and Promotional Material Australian research includes research papers for Australia, Australia regions (Northwest Shelf and the Southern Margin) and CO2 Sequestration. Promotional materials refer to pamphlets which outline geological products available from Geoscience Australia and contacts for obtaining these products. This material is grouped by region with the research papers. Geoscience Australia Online Databases Demonstration The Geoscience Australia Petroleum Databases Demonstration is a Microsoft Powerpoint presentation containing instructions on how to use Geoscience Australia's online Petroleum Databases located at: www.ga.gov.au/oracle/apcrc/ This output represents the data which is considered open file and commercial-in-confidence. Petroleum Databases available at Geoscience Australia include: the Australian Geological Provinces Database, the Petroleum Information Management System (PIMS) GIS , the National Petroleum Wells Database and the National Geoscience GIS

  • This project is based on the recognition that combinations of specific granite types and distinctive host rocks tend to be associated with certain types of Au, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sn and W mineralisation. Rarely is Proterozoic mineralisation hosted by granites themselves, for the most part being hosted in the country rock, often three or more kilometres from the nearest known granite. There is an apparent host rock control on the deposition of metals: this can be both compositional and also controlled by the competency of the host lithologies. This compositional host rock control has been documented by Stuart-Smith et al. (1993 - Geology and mineral deposits of the Cullen Mineral field, AGSO Bull. 229) for the Pine Creek Inlier and noted in the eastern Mount Isa Inlier by Wyborn and Heinrich (1993 - The relationship between late-tectonic felsic intrusives and Cu-Au mineralisation in the Eastern Fold Belt, Mount Isa Inlier, Trans Royal Soc Edinburgh, Earth Sci, 83, 201-209). This project collated data on the Proterozoic granites and their comagmatic volcanics, the mineralogical composition of the rocks that they intrude and briefly assessed the style and type of mineralisation present within 5 kms of an outcrop of granite. All data collated in the reports is built into the accompanying GIS, and essentially each item listed in the report is converted into a searchable item within the GIS. This project has aimed to provide the data and interpretations to show the following: 1) Which Proterozoic granites have metallogenic potential, 2) What commodities they are likely to be associated with, and 3) Where the better host rocks are located that are likely to host potential mineralisation. <p>Related material<a href="https://www.ga.gov.au/products/servlet/controller?event=GEOCAT_DETAILS&amp;catno=33388">The metallogenic potential of Australian Proterozoic granites. GA Record 2001/012.</a></p>

  • <p>Australia has a significant number of surface sediment geochemical surveys that have been undertaken by industry and government during the past 50 years. These surveys represent a vast investment, but up to now have been used in isolation from one another. The key to maximising the full potential of these data and the information they provide for mineral exploration, environmental management and agricultural purposes is using all surveys together, seamlessly. These geochemical surveys have not only sampled various landscape elements but have used multiple analytical techniques, instrumentation and laboratories. The geochemical data from these surveys need to be levelled to eliminate, as much as possible, non-geological variation. Using a variety of methodologies, including reanalysis of both international standards and small subsets of samples from previous surveys, we have created a seamless surface geochemical map for northern Australia, from nine surveys with 15605 samples. We tested our approach using two surveys from the southern Thomson Orogen, which removed interlaboratory and other analytical variation. Creation of the new combined and levelled northern Australian dataset paves the way for the application of statistical techniques, such as principal component analysis and machine learning, which maximise the value of these legacy data holdings. The methodology documented here can be applied to additional geochemical datasets that become available. <p><b>Citation:</b> Main, P. T. and Champion, D. C., 2020. Geochemistry of the North Australian Craton: piecing it together. In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • During the period 1984-1996, AGSO compiled and produced a series of Palaeogeographic atlases of Australia for the Phanerozoic Eon. The Atlases - Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Permian, Jurassic, and Cainozoic - contained maps which summarised the most important sedimentological data extracted from a wide variety of sources. Due to time and resource constraints four Periods (Devonian, Carboniferous, Triassic and Cretaceous) were not published, although data were compiled. Atlases consisted of a series of Data and Interpretation maps a Structure map, and supporting Stratigraphic Columns and text. Maps were compiled at a scale of 1:5 000 000. The PALAEOGEOGRAPHIC ATLAS OF AUSTRALIA dataset has resulted from the conversion of the CAD atlas maps from all ten atlases into a format compatible with GIS applications. Important CAD elements such as lithology patterns have been retained for visualisation purposes. It is envisaged that this Palaeogeographic dataset will become part of the AGCRC Australia's Geodynamic Framework project.

  • The Australian Proterozoic Large Igneous Provinces GIS Dataset is designed for display at a nominal 1:5 000 000 scale, showing the time-space distribution of Proterozoic Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) in Australia. Large Igneous Provinces are relatively rare magmatic events distinguished by exceptionally large volumes of mafic dominated magma emplaced over short geological periods of a few millions years or less. Five major LIPs have been recognised, or proposed, so far in Australia, beginning with the ~1780 Ma Hart LIP, followed by the ~1210 Ma Marnda Moorn LIP, the ~1070 Ma Warakurna LIP, the ~825 Ma Gairdner LIP, and the ~510 Ma Kalkarindji LIP. The early Cambrian Kalkarindji LIP is included in this Proterozoic compilation because of its size and importance. Only the youngest two of these LIPs (Gairdner and Kalkarindji) are established as comagmatic provinces based on both time correlation and geochemical equivalence. The other proposed LIPs (Hart, Marnda Moorn and Warakurna) are based on time equivalence alone. For further information on the five proposed Proterozoic LIPs refer to the guide to using the map of Australian Proterozoic Large Igneous Provinces (Geoscience Australia Record 2009/44). Earlier released extracts include two pdf maps of Australian Proterozoic Large Igneous Provinces and an accompanying Geoscience Australia Record. This release presents the Australian Proterozoic Large Igneous Provinces as a GIS dataset and it should be used in conjunction with the Australian Mafic Ultramafic Magmatic Events GIS Dataset released by Geoscience Australia in 2014 (<a href="http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/82166">link</a>). This file geodatabase that contains points, lines and polygons representing mafic and ultramafic rocks in Australia which have been placed in a magmatic event framework in time and space, primarily based on geochronological data. Together, these datasets provide comprehensive information on the evolution of mafic-ultramafic magmatism associated with the Australian continent, and will be of interest to explorers in the search of magmatic ore deposits of nickel, platinum-group elements, chromium, titanium, and vanadium.

  • <p>Australia has established a network of 58 marine parks within Commonwealth waters covering a total of 3.3 million square kilometres, or 40 per cent of our exclusive economic zone (excluding Australian Antarctic Territory). These parks span a range of settings, from near coastal and shelf habitats to abyssal plains. Parks Australia manages the park network through management plans that came into effect for all parks on 1 July 2018. Geoscience Australia is contributing to their management by collating and interpreting existing environmental data, and through the collection of new marine data. “Eco-narrative” documents are being developed for those parks, where sufficient information is available, delivering collations and interpretations of seafloor geomorphology, oceanography and ecology. Many of these interpretations rely on bathymetric grids and their derived products, including those in this data release. <p>Bathymetry grids: <p>The bathymetry of the marine parks was created by compiling and processing Geoscience Australia’s bathymetry data holding gridded at the optimum resolution depending of the vessel’s sonar system. <p>The bathymetry of the park is illustrated by a panchromatic geotiff image, developed by combining the bathymetric data with a hillshade image. <p> Morphological Surfaces: <p>Geoscience Australia has developed a new marine seafloor classification scheme, which uses the two-part seafloor mapping morphology approach of Dove et al (2016). This new scheme is semi-hierarchical and the first step divides the slope of the seafloor into three Morphological Surface categories (Plain, <2°; Slope, 2-10°; Escarpment, >10°). <p>Dove, D., Bradwell, T., Carter, G., Cotterill, C., Gafeira, J., Green, S., Krabbendam, M., Mellet, C., Stevenson, A., Stewart, H., Westhead, K., Scott, G., Guinan, J., Judge, M. Monteys, X., Elvenes, S., Baeten, N., Dolan, M., Thorsnes, T., Bjarnadóttir, L., Ottesen, D. (2016). Seabed geomorphology: a twopart classification system. British Geological Survey, Open Report OR/16/001. 13 pages. <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.<p><p>This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.

  • This map is suitable for school, office and home use as a single-sheet wall poster or as a handy reference item. The map includes more than 2000 named features as well as a gazetteer on the back of the map as an aid to locating places of interest. At this scale 1cm on the map represents 50km on the ground. Available flat (98.5cm x 84cm) or folded with cover (11cm x 23cm). Digital data at this scale, suitable for use in a GIS is also available for <a href=\https://www.ga.gov.au/products/servlet/controller?event=FILE_SELECTION&catno=61114\">free download. </a> Product Specifications Coverage: Complete coverage of Australia Currency: Last revised 2007 Coordinates:Geographical Datum: (GDA94); AHD Projection: Lambert Conformal Conic on two standard parallels (18o and 36o)

  • This dataset represents the current extent of bathymetry datasets held by AusSeabed as of January 2019. This dataset is live and will continue to be augmented as coverage is supplied from respective AusSeabed partners. Surveys have been conducted by a wide range of organisations and countries, both inside and outside of Australia's EEZ and for various purposes. Each polygon contains metadata describing the nature of data collection, including details of the survey, as well as the principle investigator of the project. Not all surveys are currently available for download; if available, the Data Access URL attribute will indicate how to access the survey data. Polygons are based on a 500m gridding of the survey data, so may not be representative of the true survey extent when viewed at large scale.

  • This GIS dataset represents digital files accompanying the Index of Airborne Geophysical Surveys (13th edition) 2013, which presents a summary of specifications of open file surveys held in GA's National Airborne Geophysical Database. The product provides spatial coverage and metadata for all magnetic, radiometric and AEM surveys for which spatial information is available, current to 21 March 2013. The GIS dataset is useful for making maps showing the coverage of open file Australian airborne geophysical surveys.