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  • This service has been created specifically for display in the National Map and the chosen symbology may not suit other mapping applications. The Australian Topographic web map service is seamless national dataset coverage for the whole of Australia. These data are best suited to graphical applications. These data may vary greatly in quality depending on the method of capture and digitising specifications in place at the time of capture. The web map service portrays detailed graphic representation of features that appear on the Earth's surface. These features include the administration boundaries from the Geoscience Australia 250K Topographic Data, including state forest and reserves.

  • This grid is derived from gravity observations stored in the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD) as at February 2016 as well as data from the 2013 New South Wales Riverina gravity survey. Out of the approximately 1.8 million gravity observations 1,371,998 gravity stations in the ANGD together with 19,558 stations from the Riverina survey were used to generate this image. The grid shows isostatic residual gravity anomalies over onshore continental Australia. The data used in this grid has been acquired by the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, the mining and exploration industry, universities and research organisations from the 1940's to the present day. The isostatic corrections were based on the assumption that topographic loads are compensated at depth by crustal roots following the Airy-Heiskanen isostatic principle. A crustal density of 2670 kg/m3 was used for the isostatic correction, with an assumed density contrast between the crust and mantle of 400 kg/m3. An initial average depth to Moho at sea level of 37 km was used in the calculation. The isostatic corrections were then applied to the Complete Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016 to produce the Isostatic Residual Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016.

  • To provide an introduction to the PacSAFE Activity

  • Science First Digital Science Capability - Raise awareness of the strategy and its values.

  • PNG has a significant exposure to natural hazards, which is likely to increase as population growth continues. Managing this risk requires a broad technical capacity and strong networks within all DRR-related organisations. Between 2010 and 2016, The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and Geoscience Australia (GA) collaborated to achieve a range of outcomes focused on building the capabilities of Papua New Guinea (PNG) technical agencies to deliver natural hazard risk information. Initially this work centred on East New Britain province, but subsequently was expanded to a national scope. The work focused on three significant natural hazards in PNG: earthquake, volcanic eruption and tsunami, and also included significant work on landslides and cross-cutting data management related capabilities. During the lifetime of the Activity, collaborative relationships between the Government of PNG technical agencies and GA served to deliver a series of outputs that contribute to improve disaster resilience outcomes in PNG. The work achieved the following outcomes. - Technical agencies in PNG have developed partnerships and networks in PNG that facilitate the transfer of knowledge, data and skills. - Scientists in PNG technical agencies are able to better assess the risk and impact from natural hazards; - A selected province in PNG is better informed about its risk from natural hazards; - The relationship between GA and PNG technical agencies is enhanced so that technical agencies have increased capacity to access and use risk assessment knowledge and skills; and - Government of PNG, DFAT and GA are aware of options for strategic support to PNG agencies that further develop their natural hazard risk assessment capacity. Key outputs in this project include. - A range of training, workshops, consultation, and ongoing collaborative projects and mentoring that developed the PNG capability in earthquake-, tsunami-, volcano- and landslide hazard analysis, as well as spatial data management and processing. Many of these also built up networks between PNG agencies and their stakeholders. - Development of a multi-hazard assessment for East New Britain, a national seismic hazard map, and targeted landslide susceptibility methodology, as well as communication material on natural hazards to the general public. The report articulates recommendations based on lessons learnt during the lifetime of this Activity. These centre on ensuring strong relationships between PNG technical agencies and GA, as the crucial factor determining successful outcomes; managing expectations, accommodating limitations in capability and capacity, and minimising technical and logistical challenges in delivering a program. These recommendations should strengthen future programs leveraging the potential of technical support for DRR.

  • This fact sheet provides you with an update on the geodetic survey work that is being conducted by Geoscience Australia in the Surat Basin region. This work commenced in 2014, and will be continuing into the future to improve Australian environmental monitoring.

  • Australian National Ocean Bottom Seismograph (OBS) Fleet is maintained by Geoscience Australia, managed by ANSIR¿Research Facilities for Earth Sounding, and funded through AuScope. These instruments will greatly contribute to the understanding of the crust beneath oceanic basins surrounding Australia. The Australian National OBS Fleet was utilised by the petroleum industry on a number of seismic surveys. High-quality data were recorded at all OBS deployment sites, often to offsets sufficiently large to detect Pn phases - refractions from the upper mantle. Analysis of earthquake data recorded during marine seismic surveys suggests strong interaction between anthropogenic signals (airgun source, vessel noise) and the natural environment. Recording earthquake and airgun signals at fixed locations opens up a completely new possibility for calibration and comparison of those signal strengths and spectral compositions.

  • The Stavely region has been described as a continental-margin arc system that developed on the eastern margin of Australia in the mid-Cambrian (c. 510490 Ma). The joint Geoscience AustraliaGeological Survey of Victoria Stavely Project, investigating the regional geology and mineral systems of the Stavely region, resulted in 14 stratigraphic holes being drilled testing regional geological models and recovering material from potentially prospective basement rocks under cover to characterise the subsurface geology. Drill core and field site samples were taken for mineral separation to extract zircon for U-Pb, Lu-Hf, O isotope and trace element geochemical analyses. The analysed samples reported here include rocks from the Mount Stavely Volcanic Complex (MSVC), including mineralised dactic porphyries, and the Bushy Creek Igneous Complex (BCIC). The U-Pb data provide age constraints on the rocks; the Lu-Hf data indicates the relative `maturity of the rocks; the O isotopes indicated the degrees of continental crustal input/recycling into the parent melt; the trace element data provides an indication of the crystallisation environment, including providing evidence of mixing of magmas and subsequent compositional changes. U-Pb data indicate that the ages of many of the igneous rocks in the Stavely region are c. 510500 Ma. Available data indicate that the MSVC was emplaced both during and after deposition of the turbiditic Nargoon Group sediments. Mineralised dacitic porphyries were syn-eruptive with the MSVC, and rocks of the BCIC were emplaced at the same time and after both the MSVC and porphyries. New U-Pb dating of zircon from rocks of the BCIC also suggests they may be syn- to post-deformation, rather than purely post-deformation. O isotope data yield d18O values less than that of the `normal mantle through to values similar to and greater then `normal mantle (values), indicating possible evolution of the arc and increase of crustal material that assimilated into later stage magmas. The samples that yield lower than `normal mantle d18O values are interpreted to have been derived from hydrothermally altered, subducted rocks that were remelted and did not significantly interact with the overlying continental crust at the time of emplacement. The mineralised porphyries display eHf values indicative of depleted mantle suggesting the melt is juvenile (i.e. do not display significant amounts of crustal reworking), while the eHf values of the MSVC rocks are more evolved. This suggests that there were multiple, distinct source magmas that had a different history (i.e. porphyries little to no crustal input, while MSVC rocks had a source with some crustal input). The plutonic rocks of the BCIC are interpreted to have had a greater degree of crustal input again. The combination of isotopic and trace element geochemical data from zircon allows for discrimination of the differences of rock units based on timing, maturity and degree of crustal reworking of their parent melts. This provides a powerful tool in assisting in unravelling the tectonic environment of the continental margin arc setting of the Stavely region.

  • Australia's government geoscience agencies work together as Australia Minerals to connect people, information and innovation to opportunities that give investors the confidence to invest in mineral exploration in Australia. This USB has been produced as a giveaway at international conferences and events attended by Australia Minerals (AM). This USB contains electronic material from each of the States and the NT grouped under the themes: Publications, Guides, Infrastructure, Maps, Mineral Resources Information, and Projects and Exploration.

  • Introduction to the new Intranet 2015