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  • Geoscience Australia is the custodian of the most comprehensive publicly available Australian airborne magnetic, gamma-ray, seismic, electromagnetic and gravity data sets. The airborne geophysics data set contains approximately 34 million line kilometres of data, which, at current prices, would cost approximately $197 million to acquire. The gravity data set contains more than 1.57 million reliable onshore stations gathered during more than 1800 surveys. The collection also includes a large number of seismic surveys from Australia's offshore basins. The onshore component of this data set was previously approved for RDSI for 8 TB. This proposal extends the collection to 150TB. The data types and access methods for the Offshore and Onshore data are identical Certain holdings are additionally hosted at the NCI (see downloads)

  • This collection contains Earth Observations from space created by Geoscience Australia. This collection specifically is focused on optical data. Example products include: Landsat NBAR Surface Reflectance, and Landsat pixel quality, etc.

  • Data used to generate the National Seismic Hazard Assessments (NSHA). Data includes: original and modified earthquake catalogues, earthquake rate models, probabilistic seismic hazard outputs. The most recent assessment was completed in 2018 and can be viewed on Geoscience Australia's <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/about/projects/safety/nsha">National Seismic Hazard Assessment (NSHA) Internet Page</a> <b>Value: </b> Data used to generate the NSHA <b>Scope: </b>Continental scale

  • Collection of field notebooks recording mainly geological observations made by staff of Geoscience Australia (GA) and its predecessors, Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) and Australian Geological Survey Organisation (AGSO), while conducting fieldwork between 1930 and 2010. The notebooks are currently being digitised. <b>Value: </b>Historic and scientific significance. Many sites visited are remote and have rarely been revisited. Some notebooks also record observations on fauna and flora. <b>Scope: </b>Geographical scope is largely Australia, pre- and post-Independence Papua New Guinea (PNG), and the Australian Antarctic Territory, but other countries and territories are represented.

  • Although the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics was created in 1946, it did not compile an annual report until 1971. The series continued under this title up to 1976, all but the last providing summaries of annual activities by broad sections (functions and organisation, field operations, laboratory studies, observatories, and so on). The 1976 Annual Report adopted a shorter format, a general outline of the role, objectives and programs of the Bureau being followed by a selection of short articles on the "more innovative and conclusive activities" of that year. This new format was retained in 1977 when a title change was made and the annual summaries became known as BMR Yearbooks.

  • 3D structural and geological models that provide insight and understanding of the continents subsurface. The models capture 3D stratigraphy and architecture, including the depth to bedrock and the locations of different major rock units, faults and geological structures. <b>Value: </b>These models are valuable for exploration and reconstructions of Australia's evolution <b>Scope: </b>Contains a variety of 3D volumetric models and surfaces that were produced for specific projects at regional to continental scale.

  • On behalf of Australia, and in support of the Malaysian accident investigation, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) led search operations for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 in the Southern Indian Ocean. Geoscience Australia provided advice, expertise and support to the ATSB to facilitate marine surveys, which were undertaken to provide a detailed map of the sea floor topography to aid navigation during the underwater search. Prior to the Phase 1 bathymetric survey, very little was known about the sea floor in the MH370 search area, as few marine surveys have taken place in the area. Existing maps of the sea floor were coarse, having been derived from satellites and only providing a general indication of water depth. Before the underwater search for MH370 could begin, it was necessary to accurately map the sea floor to ensure that the search was undertaken safely and effectively. Survey vessels spent months at sea, scanning the sea floor with multibeam sonar and side scan sonar to gather detailed, high-resolution data. This collation of datasets on the National Computational Infrastructure contains the high resolution raw and processed data acquired during Phase 2 of the search for MH370 as received by third party operators. The Phase 2 underwater search data was acquired by multiple vessels, including the Fugro Equator, Fugro Supporter, Fugro Discovery, Havila Harmony, Dong Hai Jiu 101 and Go Phoenix. Surveys were conducted using towed and autonomous underwater vehicles between September 2014 to January 2017, collecting over 121,000 square kilometres of high resolution data in the search area. All material and data from this access point is subject to copyright. Please note the creative commons copyright notice and relating to the re-use of this material. Geoscience Australia's preference is that you attribute the datasets (and any material sourced from it) using the following wording: Source: Governments of Australia, Malaysia and the People's Republic of China, 2018. MH370 Phase 2 data - Raw and processed. For additional assistance, please contact marine@ga.gov.au. We honour the memory of those who have lost their lives and acknowledge the enormous loss felt by their loved ones.

  • Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data measure variations in the conductivity of the ground by transmitting an electromagnetic signal from a system attached to a plane or helicopter. Depending on the AEM system used and the sub-surface conditions, AEM techniques can detect variations in the conductivity of the ground to a depth of several hundred metres. The responses recorded are commonly caused by the presence of electrically conductive materials such as salt or saline water, graphite, clays and sulphide minerals. <b>Value:</b> Data used for interpreting the geologic structure of the subsurface. This work can be used for the assessment of resource potential. <b>Scope:</b> Systematic coverage of large portions of the Australian continent.

  • Collection of mineral, gem, meteorite, fossil (including the Commonwealth Palaeontological Collection) and petrographic thin section specimens dating back to the early 1900s. The collection is of scientific, historic, aesthetic, and social significance. Geoscience Australia is responsible for the management and preservation of the collection, as well as facilitating access to the collection for research, and geoscience education and outreach. Over 700 specimens from the collection are displayed in our public gallery . The collection contains: • 15,000 gem, mineral and meteorite specimens from localities in Australia and across the globe. • 45,000 published palaeontological specimens contained in the Commonwealth Palaeontological Collection (CPC) mainly from Australia. • 1,000,000 unpublished fossils in a ‘Bulk Fossil’ collection. • 250,000 petrographic thin section slides. • 200 historical geoscience instruments including: cartography, geophysical, and laboratory equipment." <b>Value: </b>Specimens in the collection are derived from Geoscience Australia (GA) surveys, submissions by researchers, donations, purchases and bequests. A number of mineral specimens are held on behalf of the National Museum of Australia. <b>Scope: </b>This is a national collection that began in the early 1900s with early Commonwealth surveys collecting material across the country and British territories. The mineral specimens are mainly from across Australia, with a strong representation from major mineral deposits such as Broken Hill, and almost 40% from the rest of the world. The majority of fossils are from Australia, with a small proportion from lands historically or currently under Australian control, such as Papua New Guinea and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  • This collection supports the compilation of national mineral resource and production statistics, and mineral prospectivity analysis. The collection includes the location of Australian mineral occurrences and mineral deposit descriptions, with geological, resource and production data. This information is stored in two Geoscience Australia databases, the Mineral Deposits & Occurrences Database (OZMIN) and the Mineral Occurrence Locations (MINLOC) database. The collection also includes a number of supporting Geographic Information System (GIS) datasets (e.g., mineral prospectivity datasets, ports, power stations); maps and reports. <b>Value:</b> Data related to the known location and production of mineral resources supports decisions related to resource and economic development. <b>Scope: </b>The collection covers the Australian continent and is updated annually. It now contains data on over one thousand major and historically significant mineral deposits for 60 mineral commodities (including coal).