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  • The Surface Hydrology Points (Regional) dataset provides a set of related features classes to be used as the basis of the production of consistent hydrological information. This dataset contains a geometric representation of major hydrographic point elements - both natural and artificial. This dataset is the best available data supplied by Jurisdictions and aggregated by Geoscience Australia it is intended for defining hydrological features.

  • The Surface Hydrology Polygons (National) dataset presents the spatial locations of surface hydrology polygon features and its attributes. The dataset represents the Australia's surface hydrology at a national scale. It includes natural and man-made geographic features such as: watercourse areas, swamps, reservoirs, canals, etc. This product presents hydrology polygon features which will topological connect with the hydrology line features and forms a complete flow path network for the entire continental of Australia.

  • <b>This record was retired 01/04/2022 with approval from M.Wilson as it has been superseded by eCat 146091 Geoscience Australia Landsat Water Observation Statistics Collection 3</b> WOfS is a gridded dataset indicating areas where surface water has been observed using the Geoscience Australia (GA) Earth observation satellite data holdings. The WOfS product version 1.5 includes observations taken between 1987 to November 2014 from the Landsat 5 and 7 satellites. WOfS version 1.5 includes observations from 1987 to March 2014. Future versions of the product will extend the temporal range and diversify the data sources. WOfS covers all of mainland Australia and Tasmania but excludes off-shore Territories.

  • The Surface Hydrology Lines (Regional) dataset provides a set of related features classes to be used as the basis of the production of consistent hydrological information. This dataset contains a geometric representation of major hydrographic line elements - both natural and artificial. This dataset is the best available data supplied by Jurisdictions and aggregated by Geoscience Australia. It is intended for defining hydrological features with attributes.

  • The Surface Hydrology polygon (Regional) dataset provides a set of related features classes to be used as the basis of the production of consistent hydrological information. This dataset contains a geometric representation of major hydrographic polygon elements - both natural and artificial. This dataset is the best available data supplied by Jurisdictions and aggregated by Geoscience Australia. It is intended for defining hydrological features wtih attributes.

  • The Surface Hydrology Lines (National) dataset presents the spatial locations of surface hydrology line features and its attributes. The dataset represents the Australia's surface hydrology at a national scale. It includes natural and man-made geographic features such as: watercourses, canals, pipelines, etc. This product presents line hydrology features with full topological connectivity and flow paths for the entire continental of Australia.

  • The Surface Hydrology Points (National) dataset presents the spatial locations of surface hydrology point features and its attributes. The dataset represents the Australia's surface hydrology at a national scale. It includes natural and man-made geographic features such as: lake, soak, pool, spring, waterfall, bore, etc. This product presents small hydrology features over the entire continental of Australia.

  • Up to date information about the extent and location of surface water provides all Australians with a common understanding of this valuable and increasingly scarce resource. Digital Earth Australia Waterbodies shows the wet surface area of waterbodies as estimated from satellites. It does not show depth, volume, purpose of the waterbody, nor the source of the water. Digital Earth Australia Waterbodies uses Geoscience Australia’s archive of over 30 years of Landsat satellite imagery to identify where over 300,000 waterbodies are in the Australian landscape and tells us the wet surface area within those waterbodies. It supports users to understand and manage water across Australia. For example, users can gain insights into the severity and spatial distribution of drought, or identify potential water sources for aerial firefighting during bushfires. The tool uses a water classification for every available Landsat satellite image and maps the locations of waterbodies across Australia. It provides a timeseries of wet surface area for waterbodies that are present more than 10% of the time and are larger than 2700m2 (3 Landsat pixels). The tool indicates changes in the wet surface area of waterbodies. This can be used to identify when waterbodies are increasing or decreasing in wet surface area. Refer to Krause et al. 2021 for full details of this dataset. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13081437

  • Geometric representations of major surface water features of Australia, such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, dams, canals and catchments. Also includes hydrologic features such as catchment boundaries and drainage basins. <b>Value:</b> This data is not authoritative, but represent a valuable resource for visualisation, decision support and planning activities. <b>Scope:</b> This is a National dataset at resolution relevant for presentation of regional spatial data such as digital maps. <b>To view catalogue records associated with this collection click on the keyword "HVC_144499" below</b>

  • The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) covers one fifth of Australia and is the largest groundwater ‘basin’ on the continent. Groundwater from the GAB is a vital resource for pastoral, agricultural and extractive industries, underpinning at least $12.8 billion in economic activity annually, as well as providing town water supplies and supporting environmental and cultural values. The Australian Government, through the National Water Infrastructure Development Fund – Expansion, commissioned Geoscience Australia to undertake the project ‘Assessing the Status of Groundwater in the Great Artesian Basin’. A key deliverable of this project is a water balance (for 2019) encompassing the main aquifers of the GAB. To facilitate this outcome, a range of tools and techniques to assist in the development of improved hydrogeological conceptualisations of the GAB have been developed and assessed. This report presents the results of investigations from a pilot study area in the northern Surat Basin, Queensland, with components of the work extending into the wider GAB. The results demonstrate that the application of existing and new geoscientific data and technologies has the potential to further improve our understanding of the GAB hydrogeological system thus supporting the responsible management of basin water resources. Groundwater recharge potential within the GAB intake beds has been investigated using techniques that consider variations in physical and environmental characteristics. Empirical modelling assessing deep drainage as a recharge proxy suggests that, with isolated exceptions, diffuse recharge potential is generally low across most of the study area. The spatial variability in recharge potential can assist in the interpretation and/or interpolation of estimates derived from other techniques, such as chloride mass balance. The results of machine learning modelling suggest that further work is needed to better constrain uncertainty in input and training datasets, and in the development of robust translations of outputs to hydrogeologically meaningful products. The chloride mass balance (CMB) method remains the most appropriate tool for estimating long-term mean gross recharge to GAB aquifers in the northern Surat Basin. New upscaling methods provide significant improvements for mapping regional scale groundwater recharge rates and quantifying uncertainties associated with these estimates. Application of multiple techniques to the assessment of groundwater flow and recharge processes is necessary to complement CMB recharge estimates, and reduce associated uncertainty. Analysis of groundwater environmental tracers are recommended for constraining CMB recharge rates. Integrated geological assessments using airborne electromagnetic data in conjunction with other geophysical and geological data (e.g., reflection seismic, wells) are effective at characterising aquifer architecture to better understand geometry, flow pathways and structural controls relevant to recharge and connectivity at local to regional scales. Significant effort has gone into updating the regional geological framework at the whole-of-GAB scale, combining legacy and new data with recent knowledge to revise the hydrogeological conceptualisation of the GAB. This assists in constraining interpretations of regional depositional architecture and lithological heterogeneity within hydrogeological units, particularly those properties that influence groundwater storage and flux. Assessment of lateral and vertical heterogeneity of hydraulic properties within and between aquifers and aquitards in the northern Surat Basin has refined our understanding of potential groundwater connectivity and compartmentalisation. This study provides an improved hydrogeological framework to support revised water balance estimates for the GAB, and insights into potential recharge variability that may impact those input components. Targeted examples from the northern Surat Basin demonstrate the application of the techniques and tools employed, including methods to reduce uncertainty. The outcomes of this work underpin a revised hydrogeological conceptualisation for the GAB, a standardised basis for establishing future investigations, and a framework for more informed water management decision-making.