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  • Web Map Service of Geoscience Australia's national geophysical grids for magnetics, gravity and radiometrics. The service also contains outlines and descriptions of the airborne geophysical surveys used to compile the magnetic and radiometric grids.

  • The Surface Geology web map service provides two seamless national coverages of Australian bedrock and surficial geology, compiled at 1:1 million scale (displays only at scales less than 1:1500000), and 1:2.5 million scale (displays only at scales greater than 1:1500000). It also contains 1:5 million scale geological regions and metamorphic geology. The service represents outcropping or near-outcropping bedrock units, and unconsolidated or poorly consolidated regolith material covering bedrock.

  • This web map service provides visualisations of datasets prepared for the Technology Investment Roadmap Data Portal. The service has been developed using various mineral deposit, mine location and industrial plant location datasets sourced from the Australia’s Identified Mineral Resources (2019), produced by Geoscience Australia (http://dx.doi.org/10.11636/1327-1466.2018)

  • The Tasselled Cap Wetness (TCW) percentage exceedance composite represents the behaviour of water in the landscape, as defined by the presence of water, moist soil or wet vegetation at each pixel through time. The summary shows the percentage of observed scenes where the Wetness layer of the Tasselled Cap transform is above the threshold, i.e. where each pixel has been observed as ‘wet’. Areas that retain surface water or wetness in the landscape during the dry season are potential areas of groundwater discharge and associated GDEs. The TCW exceedance composite was classified into percentage intervals to distinguish areas that were wet for different proportions of time during the 2013 dry season. Areas depicted in the dataset have been exaggerated to enable visibility.

  • The WOfS summary statistic represents, for each pixel, the percentage of time that water is detected at the surface relative to the total number of clear observations. Due to the 25-m by 25-m pixel size of Landsat data, only features greater than 25m by 25m are detected and only features covering multiple pixels are consistently detected. The WOfS summary statistic was produced over the McBride and Nulla Basalt provinces for the entire period of available data (1987 to 2018). Pixels were polygonised and classified in order to visually enhance key data in the imagery. Areas depicted in the dataset have been exaggerated to enable visibility.

  • This service provides Australian surface hydrology, including natural and man-made features such as water courses (including directional flow paths), lakes, dams and other water bodies. The information was derived from the Surface Hydrology database, with a nominal scale of 1:250,000. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • This is the Acreage Release Marine Environmental Data compiled web service to be updated each year with acreage release. It contains the following publicly available datasets, for the 2016 Acreage Release - Marine Survey Towed-video Transects, Marine Sediments Database Samples, Australian Seascapes, Seabed Mud Content on the Northwest Shelf, Seabed Sand Content of the Northwest Shelf and Seabed Gravel Content of the Northwest Shelf.

  • The Australian Coastal Sediment Compartments Web Service provide a hierarchical spatial classification relevant to the assessment of sediment movement in the Australian coastal zone, and represent a tool to assist coastal planning and management. Additional spatial data layers produced during the development of the compartments are provided for reference.

  • The Australian Topographic base map service is seamless national dataset coverage for the whole of Australia. The map is a representation of the Geoscience Australia 250k topographic specification and portrays a detailed graphic representation of features that appear on the Earth's surface. These features include cultural, hydrography and relief themes. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • The Australian Geothermal Association compiled data on the installed capacity of direct-use geothermal and geoexchange systems in Australia, including large-scale ground source heat pumps and hot sedimentary applications through to December 2018. Large-scale direct-use hot sedimentary aquifer systems includes systems to heat swimming pools or provide hydronic heating systems. In geoexchange systems, the Earth acts as a heat source or a heat sink, exploiting the temperature difference between the surface (atmosphere) and at depth. The temperature of the Earth just a few metres below the surface is much more consistent than atmospheric temperature, especially in seasonal climates. These resources do not require the addition of geothermal heat.