From 1 - 10 / 1896
  • The Australian Neotectonics Database hosts an inventory of over 300 Australian intraplate faults and fault related folds that are known or suspected to be associated with earthquakes large enough to deform the Earth's surface (i.e. mostly M>6). These features are likely to have been the source of damaging ground shaking in the recent geologic past, and may potentially be in the future.

  • The unfiltered uranium grid is a derivative of the 2019 radiometric or gamma-ray grid of Australia which is a merge of over 600 individual gamma-ray spectrometric surveys. The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium, uranium and thorium. The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory Governments and the private sector. The 2019 unfiltered uranium grid has a cell size of about 100m (0.001 degrees) and shows uranium element concentrations of the Australia region.

  • The unfiltered potassium grid is a derivative of the 2019 radiometric grid of Australia. The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory Governments and the private sector. The 2019 unfiltered potassium grid has a cell size of about 100 m (0.001 degrees) and shows potassium element concentrations of the Australia region. Potassium is the seventh most abundant element in the Earth's crust. The potassium concentration grid can be used to locate minerals and compounds containing potassium.

  • The present study reports on recent developments of the Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning System (InaTEWS), especially with respect to the tsunami modeling components used in that system. It is a dual system: firstly, InaTEWS operates a high-resolution scenario database pre-computed with the finite element model TsunAWI; running in parallel, the system also contains a supra real-time modeling component based on the GPU-parallelized linear long-wave model easyWave capable of dealing with events outside the database coverage. The evolution of the tsunami scenario database over time is covered in the first sections. Starting from the mere coverage of the Sunda Arc region, the current state contains scenarios in 15 fault zones. The study is augmented by an investigation of warning products used for early warning like the estimated wave height (EWH) and the estimated time of arrival (ETA). These quantities are determined by easyWave and TsunAWI with model specific approaches. Since the numerical setup of the models is very different, the extent of variations in warning products is investigated for a number of scenarios, where both pure database scenarios and applications to real events are considered.

  • The unfiltered thorium grid is a derivative of the 2019 radiometric or gamma-ray grid of Australia which is a merge of over 600 individual gamma-ray spectrometric surveys. The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data are collected on airborne geophysical surveys conducted by Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory Governments and the private sector. The 2019 unfiltered thorium grid has a cell size of about 100 m (0.001 degrees) and shows thorium element concentrations of the Australia region.

  • This package contains airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data from the "SkyTEM helicopter EM Southern Stuart region" survey which was flown over an area between Alice Springs and Tennant Creek, Northern Territory during July - August 2017. The area is comprised of 9666 line km in total. The aim of the survey is to provide at a reconnaissance scale: a) trends in regolith thickness and variability b) variations in bedrock conductivity c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover d) the groundwater resource potential of the region e) palaeovalley systems known to exist in the region. This report lists the SkyTEM system information and specifications relevant for this survey, and describes the processing carried out on the data. Geoscience Australia commissioned the survey as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. The EFTF program is led by Geoscience Australia (GA), in collaboration with the Geological Surveys of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia, and is investigating the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources in northern Australia and South Australia. The EFTF is a four-year $100.5 million investment by the Australian Government in driving the next generation of resource discoveries in northern Australia, boosting economic development across this region (https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf).

  • Promotional flyer comprising map showing petroleum exploration permits, pipelines and basins in Australia

  • We digitize surface rupture maps and compile observational data from 67 publications on ten of eleven historical, surface-rupturing earthquakes in Australia in order to analyze the prevailing characteristics of surface ruptures and other environmental effects in this crystalline basement-dominated intraplate environment. The studied earthquakes occurred between 1968 and 2018, and range in moment magnitude (Mw) from 4.7 to 6.6. All earthquakes involved co-seismic reverse faulting (with varying amounts of strike-slip) on single or multiple (1–6) discrete faults of ≥ 1 km length that are distinguished by orientation and kinematic criteria. Nine of ten earthquakes have surface-rupturing fault orientations that align with prevailing linear anomalies in geophysical (gravity and magnetic) data and bedrock structure (foliations and/or quartz veins and/or intrusive boundaries and/or pre-existing faults), indicating strong control of inherited crustal structure on contemporary faulting. Rupture kinematics are consistent with horizontal shortening driven by regional trajectories of horizontal compressive stress. The lack of precision in seismological data prohibits the assessment of whether surface ruptures project to hypocentral locations via contiguous, planar principal slip zones or whether rupture segmentation occurs between seismogenic depths and the surface. Rupture centroids of 1–4 km in depth indicate predominantly shallow seismic moment release. No studied earthquakes have unambiguous geological evidence for preceding surface-rupturing earthquakes on the same faults and five earthquakes contain evidence of absence of preceding ruptures since the late Pleistocene, collectively highlighting the challenge of using mapped active faults to predict future seismic hazards. Estimated maximum fault slip rates are 0.2–9.1 m Myr−1 with at least one order of uncertainty. New estimates for rupture length, fault dip, and coseismic net slip can be used to improve future iterations of earthquake magnitude—source size—displacement scaling equations. Observed environmental effects include primary surface rupture, secondary fracture/cracks, fissures, rock falls, ground-water anomalies, vegetation damage, sand-blows/liquefaction, displaced rock fragments, and holes from collapsible soil failure, at maximum estimated epicentral distances ranging from 0 to ~250 km. ESI-07 intensity-scale estimates range by ± 3 classes in each earthquake, depending on the effect considered. Comparing Mw-ESI relationships across geologically diverse environments is a fruitful avenue for future research.

  • High‐resolution optical satellite imagery is used to quantify vertical surface deformation associated with the intraplate 20 May 2016 Mw 6.0 Petermann Ranges earthquake, Northern Territory, Australia. The 21 ± 1‐km‐long NW trending rupture resulted from reverse motion on a northeast dipping fault. Vertical surface offsets of up to 0.7 ± 0.1m distributed across a 0.5‐to‐1‐km‐wide deformation zone are measured using the Iterative Closest Point algorithm to compare preearthquake and postearthquake digital elevation models derived from WorldView imagery. The results are validated by comparison with field‐based observations and interferometric synthetic aperture radar. The pattern of surface uplift is consistent with distributed shear above the propagating tip of a reverse fault, leading to both an emergent fault and folding proximal to the rupture. This study demonstrates the potential for quantifying modest (<1 m) vertical deformation on a reverse fault using optical satellite imagery.

  • <p>This is a recent compilation of all the processed multibeam bathymetric data that Geoscience Australia holds in its database for the Bremer and Denmark Sub-Basins. The location of the sub-basin lies in deep water off the southwest margin of WA between Broke and Esperance in Southern Western Australia. <p>This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia. <p>Not to be used for navigational purposes.