From 1 - 10 / 1894
  • The Australian Geological Provinces Database contains descriptions and spatial extents of the fundamental geological elements of the Australian continent and offshore surrounds. Province types include sedimentary basins, tectonic provinces such as cratons and orogens, igneous provinces, and metallogenic provinces. Spatial data has been captured largely at approximately 1:1M scale for intended use between 1:2M and 1:5M scale.

  • <p>Flythrough movie of Gifford Marine Park, which is located 700 km east of Brisbane, Australia. The park is situated about halfway along the Lord Howe Rise seamount chain on the western flank of the Lord Howe Rise. Seamounts along this chain formed from Miocene volcanism via a migrating magma source (“hotspot”) after the opening of the Tasman Sea. Two large, flat-topped volcanic seamounts dominate the park. Their gently sloping summits have accumulated veneers of sediment, which in places have formed fields of bedforms. Steep cliffs, debris and large mass movement scars encircle each seamount, and contrast with the lower gradient abyssal plains from which they rise. Spanning over 3 km of ocean depths, the seamounts are likely to serve multiple and important roles as breeding locations, resting areas, navigational landmarks or supplementary feeding grounds for some cetaceans (e.g. humpback whales, sperm whales). They may also act as important aggregation points for other highly migratory pelagic species. The bathymetry shown here was collected on two surveys - the first in 2007 by Geoscience Australia and the second in 2017 by Geoscience Australia in collaboration with the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. The Gifford Marine Park has also been the focus of a study undertaken by the Marine Biodiversity Hub as part of the National Environmental Science Program. <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.

  • <p>Bathymetry flythrough of Perth Canyon using data acquired by Schmidt Ocean Institute in 2015 on RV Falkor (University of Western Australia et al.). The flythrough highlights geomorphic features mapped by Geoscience Australia, including landslides, escarpments and bedform fields and biodiversity associated with the canyon (benthic and pelagic). Produced as a science communication product for the Marine Biodiversity Hub (National Environmental Science Program). <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.

  • <p>The Roebuck Basin on Australia’s offshore north-western margin is the focus of a regional hydrocarbon prospectivity assessment being undertaken by the North West Margin Energy Studies Section (NWMES). This offshore program is designed to produce pre-competitive information to assist with the evaluation of the hydrocarbon resource potential of the central North West Shelf and attract exploration investment to Australia. <p>The recent oil and gas discoveries at Phoenix South 1 (2014), Roc 1 (2015-16), Roc 2 (2016), Phoenix South 2 (2016), Phoenix South 3 (2018) and Dorado 1 (2018) in the Bedout Sub-basin demonstrate the presence of a petroleum system in Lower Triassic strata. The current study aims to better understand this new petroleum system and establish its extent. <p>As part of this program, TOC and Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses were undertaken by Geoscience Australia on selected rock samples from the well Roc 2 to establish their hydrocarbon-generating potential and thermal maturity.

  • <p>The Roebuck Basin and adjoining Beagle Sub-basin are underexplored areas on Australia’s North West Shelf and are undergoing renewed exploration interest since the discovery of oil at Phoenix South 1 and gas at Roc 1, 2 in the Bedout Sub-basin. A well folio of 24 offshore wells across the Beagle, Bedout, Rowley and Barcoo sub-basins was completed as part of Geoscience Australia’s assessment of hydrocarbon prospectivity across the region. The study consists of composite well log plots summarising lithology, stratigraphy, GA’s newly acquired biostratigraphic and geochemical data and petrophysical analysis, in conjunction with revised sequence interpretations. <p>The wells included in the well folio package are: <p>Anhalt 1, Barcoo 1 ST2, Bedout 1, Bruce 1, Cossigny 1, De Grey 1A ST1, Delambre 1, Depuch 1, East Mermaid 1B ST1, Hanover South 1, Huntsman 1, Keraudren 1. Lagrange 1, Minilya 1, Nebo 1, Omar 1, Phoenix 1, Phoenix 2, Phoenix South 1 ST1 ST2, Picard 1, Poissonnier 1, Roc 1, Steel Dragon 1 and Wigmore 1

  • Geological storage of CO2 has been identified as an effective technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate global climate change. Deep saline aquifers are recognised as having the highest CO2 storage potential. The Junggar Basin is located in the northern Xinjiang and has extensive distributed deep saline aquifers, which could be the effective sites for CO2 storage. CO2 injectivity and storage capacity were investigated through both static and dynamic modelling on the Cretaceous Donggou Formation aquifer in Zhundong area, Junggar Basin. A static reservoir model was constructed by integrating well data and seismic attributes, and the best estimate of storage capacity (P50) was estimated to be approximately 72 million tonnes using a storage coefficient of 2.4% (P50). Dynamic simulation provided a comprehensive understanding of injectivity, storage capacity and explanation of the different storage mechanisms after CO2 injection. The total injection of CO2 was 31.4 million tonnes with five injection wells. Simulations suggest that at year 300 after injection, 28% of the injected CO2 was stored by residual trapping and 26% of the injected CO2 was dissolved into formation water. The modelling results suggest that there is good potential for large scale CO2 aquifer storage in the Junggar Basin.

  • <p>The Roebuck Basin on Australia’s offshore north-western margin is the focus of a regional hydrocarbon prospectivity assessment being undertaken by the North West Margin Energy Studies (NWMES) section. This offshore program is designed to produce pre-competitive information to assist with the evaluation of the hydrocarbon resource potential of the central North West Shelf and facilitate exploration investment in Australia. <p>The recent oil and gas discoveries at Phoenix South 1 (2014), Roc 1 (2015-16), Roc 2 (2016), Phoenix South 2 (2016), Phoenix South 3 (2018) and Dorado 1 (2018) wells in the Bedout Sub-basin demonstrate the presence of a petroleum system in Lower Triassic strata. The current study aims to better understand this new petroleum system and establish its extent. <p>As part of this program, a range of organic geochemical analyses were acquired on two crude oils from the Phoenix South 1 ST2 well with these data released in this dataset.

  • It is generally accepted that the near surface search space for mineral deposits in Australia and elsewhere in the world has been well explored and the frontier of exploration lies beneath post-mineralisation cover. The Exploring for the Future program aims to unlock this new search space in northern Australia and parts of southern Australia by reducing the technical risk of mineral exploration through the provision of innovative pre-competitive data and information. The first step to de-risk undercover exploration is to simply define the depth to prospective rocks as cover-thickness places first order constraints on the economic search space. With this aim in mind we present a preliminary model of the depth to pre-Neoproterozoic rocks between Tennant Creek and Mt Isa, an area of focused integrated studies of the Exploring for the Future program. This work aims to compliment recent and ongoing mineral potential assessments in this region, which suggest covered pre-Neoproterozoic rocks are prospective for iron oxide-copper-gold and sediment hosted base metal mineral deposits. Our model utilises a dasets of over eight four thousand point estimates of the depth to pre- Neoproterozoic strata from boreholes, reflection seismic profile interpretations and depth to magnetic top estimates mostly sourced from the new Estimates of Geological and Geophysical Surfaces database supplemented by the distribution of pre-Neoproterozoic strata outcrops. These constraints were objectively queried based on their reliability, subsampled at 0.05 degrees and gridded using an adjustable tension continuous curvature-surfacing algorithm. The result shows Palaeozoic cover-thickness generally increases away from outcrops with a notable exception east of Tennant Creek where cover-thickness is typically less than 250 m thick. Fortuitously, this region of shallow cover termed the East Tennant Ridge corresponds with a region recently assess to have potential to host iron oxide-copper-gold mineralisation.

  • <p>In the South Nicholson region of Queensland and the Northern Territory, the Paleoproterozoic Isa Superbasin and the Mesoproterozoic South Nicholson Basin have the potential to host both conventional and unconventional petroleum systems (Gorton & Troup, 2018). The region remains poorly explored however with only 19 petroleum wells drilled in total (Carr et al., 2016). Although nine stratigraphic intervals are described as potential source rocks, data coverage is extremely limited and a large proportion of the available data is old and of poor quality. To more comprehensively characterise these organic rich source rocks, higher resolution coverages of pre-competitive geochemical data is required (Jarrett et al. 2018). <p>This report contains the total organic carbon (TOC) content and Rock-Eval pyrolysis data of 674 samples selected from twelve drill cores housed in the Geological Survey of Queensland’s Brisbane core repository including Amoco DDH 83-1, Amoco DDH 83-2, Amoco DDH 83-3, Amoco DDH 83-4, Argyle Creek 1, Armraynald 1, Burketown 1, Desert Creek 1, Egilabria 1, Egilabria 2 DW1, Egilabria 4, Morstone 1, MORSTONE DDH1. This data was generated at the Isotope and Organic Geochemistry Laboratory at Geoscience Australia as part of the Exploring for the Future program.

  • A review of mineral exploration trends, activities and discoveries in Australia in 2017-2018