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  • A multicomponent seismic survey using an IVI MiniVib as a source was carried out to assist in mapping of fracture porosity in shear zones in areas of dryland salinity for the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (UNSW). The survey obtained a set of three dimensional, three component data at two sites near Spicers Creek, some 45km east of Dubbo. The acquisition was undertaken by Australian National Seismic Imaging Resource (ANSIR) from the 5th to the 12th April 2003 with the assistance of staff from UNSW. The objectives of this seismic survey are: 1. Develop quantitative measure of azimuthal anisotropy of P- and S-waves using refracted head wave amplitudes. 2. Determine the relative effects of lithological fabric and fracture porosity on P- and S-wave anisotropy factors. 3. Determine quantitative relationships between azimuthal anisotropy and fracture porosity. 4. Measure the horizontal and vertical variability of the fracture porosity in the fracture zones which control the discharge of saline groundwater and the occurrence of dryland salinity at the three experimental sites in the Spicers Creek Catchment. 5. Develop cost-effect field techniques for 3D - 3C (three dimensional - three component) shallow seismic refraction surveys for geotechnical, environmental and groundwater applications. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Urapunga, NT, 1994 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1994 by the NT Government, and consisted of 68000 line-kilometres of data at 500m line spacing and 100m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 100m) and shows potassium element concentration of the SA Exploration Initiative 1995 - Area B30, Palm Valley, NT, 1987. survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the SA Government, and consisted of 38052 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Buchanan, NT, 2002 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2002 by the NT Government, and consisted of 84000 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m) and shows potassium element concentration of the SA Exploration Initiative, Area D3, 1994 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1994 by the SA Government, and consisted of 16682 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000417 degrees (approximately 40m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Naretha, WA, 2009 (Eucla Basin 3) survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2009 by the WA Government, and consisted of 124798 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 50m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000493 degrees (approximately 50m) and shows uranium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000, Area S, Braidwood, NSW 2001 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in UNKNOWN by the NSW Government, and consisted of 19000 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000417 degrees (approximately 40m) and shows uranium element concentration of the Flinders Island, Tasmania, 2007 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2007 by the Tas Government, and consisted of 18635 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 90m terrain clearance.

  • Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey in the Canning Basin during the period May to November 1988. A total of 650 km of seismic line involving three traverses were shot twelve-fold using a station spacing 50 metres and shot interval of 200 metres. The surveying for this survey was carried out by the Australian Surveying and Land Information Group (AUSLIG) of the Commonwealth Department of Administrative Services. Geoscience Australia commissioned reprocessing of this legacy dataset to improve data quality, imaging reflective structural features within the basin. This reprocessing project is a collaboration between the Geoscience Australia Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program and The Government of Western Australia, Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety, Exploration Incentive Scheme (EIS). Velseis Pty Ltd carried out reprocessing from December 2017 through July 2018. GA managed the project, QCed the data processing and at the end of the project archived the data. This dataset includes images and SEGY files for Stack, Pre-stack Migration and Post-Stack Migration data. The dataset is available for download. <b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74956</b>

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.00125 degrees (approximately 130m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Tanami, NT, 1989 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1989 by the NT Government, and consisted of 40179 line-kilometres of data at 500m line spacing and 90m terrain clearance.