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  • Map(s) of Mg (magnesium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of Nb (niobium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of Sn (tin) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of U (uranium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Map(s) of Zr (zirconium) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • Digital Geology and Lithology maps of the Strangways Range Region in the eastern Arunta Region of the Northern Territory have been produced from a scanned image of the first edition map published by the Bureau of Mineral Resources in 1984. The image was digitised using Microstation and ArcInfo software, and attributed to meet standards for Version 2004.01 of the Geoscience Australia Digital Data Dictionary for GIS Produces as closely as possible. The finished product has been provided as ArcView shape files and ArcInfo export files on CD-ROM. Extensive internal quality assurance and quality control processes have been used to verify the data.

  • A significant problem for ground-based gamma-ray spectrometric surveys is the effect of emanation radon on estimated uranium concentration estimates. Radon gas (a daughter product in the U238 decay series) escapes from rocks and soils near the earth?s surface into the lower atmosphere. Under early morning, still-air conditions, radon concentrates as a thin layer near the earth?s surface. If ground radiometric surveying is undertaken before this radon layer is mixed into the lower atmosphere, large errors in U concentration estimates result. This paper shows the effect of early-morning radon accumulation on a quad-bike gamma-ray spectrometric survey near Boorowa, NSW. Paddocks surveyed early-morning show much higher apparent uranium concentrations than those surveyed later in the day. We demonstrate the radon diurnal effect by recording the apparent U concentration at a fixed site over several weeks. Typically, there is a build-up of radon near the earth?s surface overnight. Radon concentration reaches a maximum at about 7 am before slowly dispersing over a period of 2-3 hours. The diurnal data also show the effect of rainfall on apparent U concentrations. Rain precipitates radioactive daughter products of atmospheric radon onto the ground resulting in a significant increase in apparent U concentration. These short-lived daughter products decay to insignificant concentrations within about 3 hours. Ground surveys should not be conducted within 3 hours of rain, or under early-morning, still-air conditions.

  • At this scale 1cm on the map represents 1km on the ground. Each map covers a minimum area of 0.5 degrees longitude by 0.5 degrees latitude or about 54 kilometres by 54 kilometres. The contour interval is 20 metres. Many maps are supplemented by hill shading. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours, localities and some administrative boundaries. Product Specifications Coverage: Australia is covered by more than 3000 x 1:100 000 scale maps, of which 1600 have been published as printed maps. Unpublished maps are available as compilations. Currency: Ranges from 1961 to 2009. Average 1997. Coordinates: Geographical and either AMG or MGA coordinates. Datum: AGD66, GDA94; AHD Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator UTM. Medium: Printed maps: Paper, flat and folded copies. Compilations: Paper or film, flat copies only.

  • Map(s) of Au (gold) concentration (Total content, Aqua Regia soluble content, and/or Mobile Metal Ion soluble content) in Top Outlet Sediment (TOS) and/or Bottom Outlet Sediment (BOS) samples, dry-sieved to <2 mm and/or <75 um grain size fractions. Source: The Geochemical Atlas of Australia (Caritat and Cooper, 2011)

  • This report describes the geology of the area covered by the SKIPTON 1:100 000 sheet area (7522) in western Victoria. Geomorphology, stratigraphy, structure, metamorphism and economic geology of the area are described. Brief outlines of the regional geological setting and geological history are also presented. The Skipton 1:100 000 sheet area comprises an inlier of early Palaeozoic meta-sediments and intrusives, unconformably overlain by surficial Cainozoic sediments and volcanics. The exposed bedrock forms the westernmost part of the Lachlan Fold Belt. Exposed bedrock comprises Cambrian-Ordovician turbidites of the Warrak and Pyrenees Formations of the Saint Arnaud Group. These units were deformed and regionally metamorphosed to low-grade during the Silurian Benambran deformation and later intruded by Devonian fractionated I-type granite plutons. A transgressive fluviatile to marine sequence of Tertiary rocks overlies older units in the centre and west: units distinguished are the White Hills Gravel, Dilwyn Formation, Heytesbury Group and Moorabool Viaduct Sand. Quaternary units cover most of the sheet area and comprise basalt flows and scoria deposits of the Newer Volcanics, and a range of fluvial and lacustrine sediments including: older alluvial terrace deposits; older alluvial and colluvial deposits; colluvial deposits; swamp and lagoonal deposits; stream alluvial deposits; and lunette deposits. Late Pleistocene aeolian clay, the Windgelli Clay, forms a thin veneer over the most of the Palaeozoic rocks and the Newer Volcanics. The previously worked tungsten, gold, bismuth and silver - bearing vein deposit at Pittong is the only metalliferous occurrence known in SKIPTON. However, the area contains more significant nonmetalliferous deposits including the Pittong clay deposit and deposits of sand, granite, basalt, and scoria.