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  • This service provides Australian surface hydrology, including natural and man-made features such as water courses (including directional flow paths), lakes, dams and other water bodies. The information was derived from the Surface Hydrology database, with a nominal scale of 1:250,000. The National Basins and Catchments are a national topographic representation of drainage areas across the landscape. Each basin is made up of a number of catchments depending on the features of the landscape. This service shows the relationship between catchments and basins. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 88 Tasmanian coastal waterways. The classification system contains 11 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. The majority of near pristine estuaries in Tasmania are located in the south and west of the State and on Cape Barren Island, according to the Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 213 Queensland coastal waterways. This version of the dataset includes 73 newly mapped estuaries, classified as 'Near pristine'. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Southern and central Great Barrier Reef lagoon coasts have a broad spectrum of river, tide and wave- dominated estuaries.

  • This dataset maps the geomorphic habitat environments (facies) for 36 South Australian coastal waterways. The classification system contains 12 easily identifiable and representative environments: Barrier/back-barrier, Bedrock, Central Basin, Channel, Coral, Flood- and Ebb-tide Delta, Fluvial (bay-head) Delta, Intertidal Flats, Mangrove, Rocky Reef, Saltmarsh/Saltflat, Tidal Sand Banks (and Unassigned). These types represent habitats found across all coastal systems in Australia. Most of the 36 coastal waterways have a "Modified" environmental condition (as opposed to "Near Pristine"), according to the National Land and Water Resources Audit definition.

  • A detailed analysis of aquifer systems in the Broken Hill Managed Aquifer Recharge priority areas has clarified our understanding of key components of the aquifer systems. Of the priority areas examined in detail, the aquifers located in the Darling Floodplain are considered to have the greatest potential for developing Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) options and for hosting significant volumes of previously undefined fresh and brackish groundwaters with low levels of allocation, thereby assisting the larger strategic effort aimed at identifying significant water-saving measures for the Darling River system.

  • Boring by the Alice Springs Works Department and by Webb Bros. of Mt. Riddock Station showed that subterranean water supplies in the schists and gneisses in this area are usually small in quantity and that the water is brackish. The best chances of obtaining water for the mining fields seems to lie in sinking relatively shallow wells on the creeks and depressions running northward from the Harts Range. These depressions are believed to contain from 30 to 60 ft. of alluvium. Eight possible sites for wells were selected, two being within the foothills of the main range and six at a distance of 1.5 to 2 miles from the foothills of the range. Six of these sites are now being tested by a light hand-boring plant. This plant is expected to penetrate the alluvium quickly and wells will be sunk where favourable results are obtained. The sites selected are within easy reach of the following mines: Jenkins' Mine, The Spotted Tiger Mine, B. Rech's (Rex?) Mine, Hit and Miss Mine, Central Mine and Eldorado Mine.

  • Report on the possibilities of underground water on Piney Creek pastoral lease. This report follows a visit to the lease conducted in response to a request for advice regarding water supply.

  • For nearly nine months of the year the river proper is confined to a narrow channel two to three hundred feet wide. During the remainder of the year, however, the river is subject to periodical floodings resulting from heavy tropical rain on its water-shed and for periods of a week of more at a time the low level bridge is covered by flood water. The dislocation of rail traffic which results from these periodical floodings has been a matter of serious concern to the Queensland authorities for many years and a decision was made to construct a high level rail and road bridge to replace the existing structure. Construction was commenced, but before it proceeded far, it was considered desirable that the depth of the bedrock, previously examined, should be established without doubt. In view of the uncertainty of the depth to be drilled and the very considerable difficulty in drilling through alternating layers of drift sand and boulder wash, a request was made by the Co-ordinator General of Public works for Queensland for a geophysical investigation of the site. A survey was carried out by the geophysical section of the Commonwealth Bureau of Mineral Resources during August and September, 1947. The investigation of the results is far from complete but the seismic method gave such concise results that this preliminary statement is justified. Geology, geophysical methods, results, interpretation, and testing are discussed in this report.

  • An area of about 12,000 square miles was mapped in the field seasons 1950-51. It contains four Pre-Cambrian rock groups ranging from Archaeozoic to Uppermost Proterozoic. The main groups in the area, the Mt. Isa and Lawn Hill Groups, are shallow-water geosynclinal sediments involved in a Proterozoic orogeny which resulted in fairly intensive folding along dominantly north-south axes, together with much faulting. The geological features discussed in this report include physiography, topography, stratigraphy, igneous activity, structure, mineral deposits and water supply.

  • With Australia's postwar immigration programme and the increased demand for food supplies, an expansion of Australia's rural industries is of primary importance, both to increase domestic food supplies and to obtain foreign exchange by export of primary produce. For such a development, the rainfall, surface and underground water resources are the factors of prime importance. In West Australia the difficulties met in finding water for farming purposes prevents rational development of many rural areas. Also, in some places town water supplies are insufficient or the water is saline. Water resources may be classified as follow: rain water from tanks or dams, water from bores or wells, water from old mine shafts (in mining districts), water from springs, [and] water from rivers. The present investigations are not concerned with the last two types of water supply. The following aims were set. 1. To test several types of instruments, to discover their limitations and ranges and the optimum conditions for their operations. 2. To estimate the accuracy of depth determination to discontinuities which might be related to the geology. 3. To investigate the possibility of distinguishing the nature of the discontinuities, for instance, decomposed granite, fresh granite, ground water level, etc., and the possibility of estimating whether ground water is fresh, brackish or saline. The tests areas were selected in the belief that sufficient bore information would be available to serve as controls. However, except at Austin Downs, near Cue, and at Big Bell, the bore information was generally insufficient, vague and unreliable. With the exceptions mentioned above, adequate records had not been kept. The purpose of the geophysical survey was not primarily to search for areas with favourable ground water occurrences but to test the resistivity method in areas where information on the occurrence of ground water was available from existing wells and bores. The order in which the tests are described in the report is: Wubin, Cue, Big Bell, Lake Grace and Kulkin.