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  • During the period August 1942 - August 1943, a boring campaign was conducted in the Coorabin section of the coalfield by the Commonwealth Coal Commission. The boring was done by the Water Conservation and Irrigation Commission of New South Wales under the supervision of the Mineral Resources Survey Branch of the Department of Supply and Shipping. When the Coal Commission withdrew, and before the plant was removed from the field, an additional bore was put down by the Department of Supply and Shipping in the Oaklands section of the field. This report contains the results of analyses of the bores.

  • This report is written primarily to present the determination of the permeability and porosity of a number of rocks and minerals, but it has also been considered advisable to give a brief description of the different kinds of apparatus designed and used in making the determinations. The materials on which the tests were carried out included a suite of specimens from No. 10 bore, Lakes Entrance, two specimens of sandstone from one of the bores at Roma, Queensland, and a number of Australian diatomites. The method of presentation adopted in this report is, firstly to describe the apparatuses used in making the determinations and the technique adopted in preparing the specimens for testing and secondly to discuss the results obtained for each set of specimens. In addition to the permeability and porosity tests already mentioned, a number of tests of compressive strength were made on wet and dry samples of glauconitic sandstone from Lakes Entrance.

  • A brief report on the occurrence of beryl on Yinnietharra Station, Western Australia was prepared following a visit to the locality in December 1948. That report referred to three deposits: 1) 0.25 to 0.5 mile N.25°W. from The Cairn; 2)0.25 mile S.60°E from the Mica King mine; 3) Rowe's mine, 2 miles southeast from Morrissey Hill. The report stated that 20 or 30 tons of detrital beryl in large pieces could be picked from the surface with ease. It was pointed out that by collecting small pieces and wider search the immediately available tonnage might be doubled. In June 1944, the first two of the above deposits were again visited, as was one on Bidgemia Station not seen on the previous occasion.

  • "Greisen Lode" is the name given locally to the foot-wall section of a wider mineralised zone, which will be referred to as the Greisen Orebody in this report. Mining operations have been carried out by tributers in recent years on several portions of the orebody, namely, stoping from the Main Tunnel, stoping from an adit-crosscut driven from the No. 4 Gossan Bench, and some stoping operations from a level above the latter bench. During the past three months a level has been driven for 260 feet westwards from the Main Tunnel to prospect the orebody at this level and develop it for mining. Over the past few weeks a detailed geological examination of the orebody has been made and the area involved mapped on a scale of 20 feet to an inch by means of plane table and alidade.

  • The Wilks Creek wolfram mine is situated in the parish of Steavenson, county of Anglesey in central Victoria. It is approximately 4 miles south from the small town of Marysville, a popular tourist resort, and 61 miles by road northeast from Melbourne. Underground and surface mapping was carried out on the 23rd and 24th November, 1943, with compass, tape and Abney level. This report comprises an overview of production history, general geology, economic geology and ore reserves.

  • The following notes are intended to accompany Map No.1049, which has the same title as that given above. This map was prepared at the request of the Survey Directorate, L.H.Q., Melbourne, Department of the Army, and is primarily for the use of the Director of Survey, Advanced L.H.Q., Brisbane. The map is termed "provisional" since it is based on only a portion of the data available and the reductions have been made by approximate methods. Nevertheless since use has been made of that portion of the data which has been most recently observed it is considered the most reliable for most practical purposes. For some time work has been proceeding on a final map showing the distribution of magnetic inclination over Australia and the surrounding areas, and this map will be available in the near future.

  • The majority of the foraminiferal species in the samples submitted have been found in the drill cuttings from the Artesian Bores around Bourke and Mungindi in northern New South Wales and the tests are in the same condition of preservation. The species recognised in these samples are listed in this report.

  • King Island Scheelite Mine is located on the east coast of King Island and is sixteen miles by road from Currie, the principal port on the island. The open cut method of mining is employed and the mine is an important producer of scheelite. There is scope for greatly increased production from the open cut area alone and with a view towards assessing the full possibilities of the area as a whole, geological and geophysical surveys were started concurrently by the Mineral Resources Survey Branch in June, 1942. The geophysical field work was conducted between 19th June and 10th July, 1942.

  • Gypsum has been found in all the states of the Commonwealth, but, as far as known at present, deposits of commercial importance are limited to New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. South Australia is the major producer and provides approximately 80 percent of the total Australian production. An account of gypsum deposits and occurrence by state is given in this report.

  • This report deals with the results obtained in tests with the electrical resistivity method on the brown coalfields at Morwell and Traralgon, Victoria, in an attempt to develop a rapid method of determining the presence of the coal and its depth below the surface. These tests were carried out in the latter part of 1943 by the Geophysical Section of the Mineral Resources Survey at the request of the Victorian Electricity Commission. Thirty-four resistivity-electrode separation tests were made over a wide variety of geological sections in the parishes of Maryvale, Hazelwood and Loy Yang. These tests were preceded by a number of tests by specific resistivity made on various types of overburden and on coal exposed in the open cuts at Yallourn. This report discusses the results of these tests although verbal information concerning them has already been made available to the Commission's officers. It will be shown that under certain conditions, the predictions of the depth to coal are reliable within fairly narrow limits while under other conditions the predictions are misleading. It is proposed in the first instance to outline the method and apparatus used in these tests. In addition, it is considered advisable to outline the methods of interpretation employed in order that the conclusions reached will by fully appreciated. In addition to discussing the resistivity results, the report deals briefly with the possibility of using gravity methods on the same prospecting problem. Calculations have been made of gravity anomalies to be expected from certain coal sections and it is shown that under favourable conditions this might prove of value in determining the presence and position of the coal.