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  • The following report is based on an examination of the mine made by the writer in February, 1947, and on information gained from the Western Australian Geological Survey. The production history, geology, ore reserves, and prospects of the mine are discussed. Four accompanying plans are included.

  • Report on a preliminary micropalaeontological examination of the samples, submitted by the Frome - Broken Hill Co. Pty. Ltd., on November 3rd, 1947, from the Northern Flinders Range area. The examination was made with a view to giving assistance to the reconnaissance work now in progress.

  • The geology, production history, ore grade, and ore reserves of the Northern Star Mine are discussed in this report. Four accompanying plans are included.

  • This report comprises notes on access, physiography, the formation of heavy mineral deposits, and the geology of Stradbroke Island.

  • Palaeontological note on a rock sample from a bore which was sunk a few feet into a mud island, west of Pelican Point, Lake Victoria, Gippsland.

  • A geological reconnaissance was made of an area of approximately 27,000 square miles lying north and west of Katherine in the Northern Territory. The report is compiled in two parts. The first concerns general geology and includes accounts of the nomenclature, stratigraphy, structural geology, geological history, and geomorphology of the area. The second part comprises a summary of the economic geology. The mining industry, petroleum prospects, underground water, and recommendations are discussed. A table showing the mineral production figures for the Northern Territory, northern district, is appended.

  • Results of a micropalaeontological examination of samples taken from 1460 feet down to 1619 feet. This series is in continuation of that reported upon on 19/3/46.

  • Notes on a small collection of opalized shells, bone fragment and specimen of precious opal from White Cliffs.

  • Shortly after I took up the appointment of Mineral Economist, the high quality of the mica from the Harts Range came to my notice. Accordingly, I paid a visit to Harts Range between the 22nd September and 4th October. In judging the possibilities of developing the mica deposits of the Harts Range, the difficulty is the almost complete lack of reliable detailed mining data in the past - production data for the later war years only are available. However, by comparing the degree of areal concentration of the pegmatites, the type of deposits and the quality and sizes of the mica so far produced with those in India, a reasonable picture can be obtained of comparative possibilities. The method of approach throughout this report, therefore, will be comparison of the Harts Range with India mica. This report gives an account of the present state of the Australian mica industry, including descriptions of current trade terms, the grading and classification of mica, and the Harts Range Mica Belt deposits. Suggestions and recommendations for the development of the industry are discussed.

  • Brazil and Madagascar are the principal sources of the world supply of quartz crystal. During the early years of the war it appeared that the greatly increased demand for military purposes could not be met from these countries; consequently, it became urgently necessary to look for supplies in Australia and elsewhere. By October, 1943, the position had ehanged considerably and it appeared possible that Australian requirements of raw crystal could be met from the Brazilian deposits.