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  • How much oil and gas remains to be discovered? At the Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (APPEA) Conference in Hobart in 2001, Dr Trevor Powell, Chief of the Petroleum and Marine Division, delivered a paper discussing the future of Australia?s hydrocarbon production1. Australia has enjoyed a high level of self-sufficiency for its liquid hydrocarbon requirements but forecasts of future production suggest that as early as 2005, the level of production will drop by about 33% and by 2010, production will be down by about 50%. This production forecast includes forecast production from already developed and soon to be developed fields, as well as a component from fields yet to be discovered.

  • Australia's Identified Mineral Resources is an annual national assessment that takes a long-term view of Australian mineral resources likely to be available for mining. The assessment also includes evaluations of long-term trends in mineral resources, world rankings, summaries of significant exploration results and brief reviews of mining industry developments.

  • The map shows iron ore resources of Australia

  • Australian mineral exploration spending in 2006-07 rose by 38% to a record $1,714.6 million of which 36% was spent on the search for new deposits. Spending rose in all States and the Northern Territory with South Australia up by 78% to $260.7 million while Western Australia dominated with 49% of Australian mineral exploration spending. The base metal group was the dominant target accounting for 32% of exploration spending overtaking gold (27%) for the first time since 1983. Exploration results were announced for a wide range of commodities from across the country with the most significant being the announcement of a 38% increase in contained copper in the Olympic Dam deposit, South Australia, and of an initial 4 Moz resource in the Tropicana gold deposit, Western Australia.

  • In 2001, Australia's economic demonstrated resources (EDR) of bauxite, copper, gold, lead, magnesite, ilmenite, zircon, nickel, phosphate, PGM, tantalum, silver, vanadium and zinc increased, while those of black coal, diamonds, iron ore, lithium, manganese ore and uranium decreased. EDR of brown coal was maintained at levels similar to those reported in 2000. The reductions in EDR were due mainly to ongoing high levels of production; with low commodity prices a subsidiary factor. EDR of gold, nickel and mineral sands reached record levels. Gold EDR rose by 4% and was over 80% of total demonstrated resources, this increase in resources continuing the established long-term growth trend for gold. In recent years that trend has continued despite falling exploration expenditure reflecting an increasing trend to concentrate exploration efforts in brownfields regions in response to the sustained period of depressed gold price. Australia, continues to rank as one of the world's leading mineral resource nations. It has the world's largest EDR of lead, mineral sands, nickel, silver, tantalum, uranium and zinc. In addition, its EDR is in the top six worldwide for bauxite, black coal, brown coal, cobalt, copper, gold, iron ore, lithium, manganese ore, rare earth oxides and gem/near gem diamond. Mineral exploration expenditure rose by 1% to $683.3 million in 2000-01, which was the first increase in annual exploration spending since 1996-97. However spending for calendar year 2001, based on the sum of ABS four-quarter figures, was down by $12 million to $664.4 million. Production of many mineral commodities again reached record levels in 2000-01, and overall mine production is projected by ABARE to rise in the five years to 2006-07 with the exception of gold which they forecast will fall by 6%. ABARE have projected a very high growth of some 60% for mine production of nickel in this period. Increases are also forecast for mine production of coal (+17%), copper (4%), lead (3%), zinc (12%), bauxite (17%) and iron ore (19%).

  • Australia's mineral resources have been sustained at adequate levels, relative to production, through continued exploration at known deposits and successful exploration in greenfield regions. At a number of mines, resources have increased progressively despite mining over an extended period. Increased efficiencies in mining and processing, achieved through application of new technology, have resulted in higher recoveries of minerals from many deposits.

  • Geoscience Australia provides information on the nation's future capacity to produce mineral resources. Australia's Identified Mineral Resources is an annual nation-wide assessment of Australia's ore reserves and mineral resources. All major and a number of minor mineral commodities mined in Australia are assessed. It includes international rankings, summaries of significant exploration results, brief reviews of mining industry developments, and an analysis of mineral exploration expenditure across the States and Northern Territory. AIMR provides governments, industry, the investment sector and general community with an informed understanding of Australia's known mineral endowment and level of exploration activity. An important objective is to monitor whether resources are being discovered and developed for production at rates sufficient to maintain Australia's position as a major supplier of mineral commodities. Australia's economic demonstrated resources (EDR) for the following 18 mineral commodities increased during 2007 - antimony, bauxite, cobalt, copper, gold, iron ore, manganese ore, ilmenite, rutile, zircon, molybdenum, nickel, rare earths, silver, tungsten, uranium, vanadium and zinc. In the same period, EDR of eight commodities - black coal, cadmium, diamonds (gem and industrial), lead, niobium, phosphate rock, platinum group metals and tantalum decreased. EDR for brown coal, lithium, magnesite, shale oil and tin remained at levels similar to those reported in 2006. Increases in EDR were due to on-going drilling and evaluation of known deposits resulting in the transfer (re-assessment) of resources from inferred or sub-economic categories into EDR and the discovery of new deposits or extensions of known deposits. Sustained increases in prices for most metal and mineral commodities over recent years has allowed companies to re-assess the economic viability of lower grade resources and deposits which previously were considered to be uneconomic. Overall this has contributed to an increase in EDR for many metal and mineral commodities.

  • In 1996, Australia's Economic Demonstrated Resources (EDR) of cobalt, gold, nickel, phosphate rock and tantalum increased substantially, while EDR of bauxite, lead, lithium, platinum group metals (PGM), silver and zinc rose slightly. There was a significant reduction in EDR of gem and near gem diamond and industrial diamond due to ongoing high levels of production. Magnesite and tin EDR were also significantly reduced as a result of depletion due to production and reassessment of deposits. EDR of all other commodities remained unchanged or had minor reductions. Australia continues to rank highly as one of the world's leading mineral resource nations. It has the world's largest EDR of bauxite, lead, mineral sands (ilmenite, rutile and zircon), silver, tantalum, uranium and zinc. In addition, its EDR is in the top six worldwide for black coal, brown coal, cobalt, copper, gold, iron ore, lithium, manganese ore, nickel, rare earth oxides, gem and near gem diamond and industrial diamond. Mineral exploration expenditure rose by 7.5% in 1995-96 to $960.2 million from $893.3 million in the previous year. Increases were recorded in all states and the Northern Territory. Gold was again the main target, accounting for 57% of the total expenditure. In 1995-96 mineral resources exports increased to a new record of $34.7 billion (thousand million), a rise of 12.7% over the previous fiscal year. These export earnings comprised 60% of Australia's commodity exports, 45% of merchandise exports and 35% of the country's total exports of goods and services. The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) forecast export earnings to set a further record in 1996-97, rising by nearly 4% to over $36 billion.

  • The Tennant Creek Mining Field occupies an area extending some 70 miles east and west and 40 miles north and south. Over this area are scattered a large number of small mines and prospects and it is sometimes difficult to bring a field such as this into perspective so as to obtain some idea of its true valuation. The following notes are designed to help in this direction. The output and nature of the orebodies, and the respective positions and productivity of the major deposits, are discussed in this report.

  • This statement sets out the results of drilling by the Bureau within Swansea Sub-area N.S.W. (J.B.C. plan BG-4). The area investigated comprises approximately 115 acres, about 2 miles south of the township of Swansea in the parish of Wallarah, Country Northumberland. In the Swansea area 'test and define' core drilling by the Bureau has indicated coal reserves of approximately 302,000 tons within the physical limits required for open cut exploitation. This total is made up of more than 87,000 tons in the "Open Cut Block" and 215,000 tons in the "West Block". Proving is recommended for the open cut Block and for the West Block, except that in the latter area the obstruction which will be offered to open cutting by the presence of the P.M.G. cable should be considered before proving is undertaken.