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  • The first discovery of bauxite in South Gippsland which was brought to public notice is said to .have been made in 1918 by Mr. Donald Clarke on the property known as Nahoo , allotment 8, Parish of Narracan South. Bauxite from this deposit has been used for chemical purposes for over twenty years. It is understood that other occurrences had been noted prior to Mr Clarke's report. Eleven additional discoveries were made from time to time up to April, 1942, when the extensive prospecting programme mentioned in the foreword was undertaken. In the short time that has elapsed since then a further twelve deposits have .been discovered, making a total of 24 deposits in the adjoining parishes of Moe, Allambee East, Narracan South, Mirboo and Budgeree in the county of Buln Buln. Several of these deposits have been systematically tested by shaft sinking and boring. The deposits at Boolarra, Oallignee and Nahoo have been reported on very briefly by Whitelaw (1921), Ferguson (1936) and Baragwanath (1940), but there have been no detailed descriptions of the deposits and no general account of their geological relationships. It should be noted that there has been no authenticated report of the occurrence of bauxite in Victoria outside South Gippsland and that little is known of the deposits other than those in the Boolarra-Mirboo North area.

  • Bore No. 3853 on E.W. Langbien's Bullaroon Station, Bourke is situated 2 miles west-northwest from Bore No. 3825 on the same property and reported upon 7/12/43 and 2/11/44. This report details the results of the micro-examination of samples taken from 28 to 386 feet down.

  • Note that this record includes Record 1945/014 by the same author. The Arcadia bore is situated in the parish of Arcadia, county of Westgrove, 85 miles north of Roma and 40 miles north-north-east of Injune. Drilling operations extended from 1936 to 1939 and were carried out by Drillers Limited. The bore was drilled in a large dome structure developed in Triassic and Permian sediments. The Arcadia bore is the second deep bore in Queensland from which a comprehensive series of samples has been examined for their microfaunal content. This examination was carried out on 1,256 samples consisting of drill cuttings taken over every five feet and of cores taken at numerous depths below 4,112 feet. The findings from the examination of these samples are described in this report.

  • A visit was paid to Wiluna on July 28th and 29th, and an inspection made of the underground workings and of the plant. The extraction programme and production of arsenic at Wiluna are discussed in this report.

  • The stock saleyards comprise Block 41, Gungahlin district and are on the southeastern side of Federal Highway, 3.5 miles north from Civic Centre. A smaller area on the western extremity of the block, including stock pens, huts etc. is without water supply. The topography, geology and possibilities of obtaining underground water are discussed in this report.

  • Bore No. 3831 on W.L. Fennell's property is situated about 30 miles northeast of Langbien's bores. This report describes the results of a micro-examination of samples taken from 6 feet down to 1118 feet.

  • A preliminary geological examination of an area at the northern extremity of Gungahlin district was carried out for the purpose of determining with fair approximation the area occupied by slate apparently suitable for brick-making. The geology of the area and the suitability of the site for a brick pit are discussed in this report. A geological sketch map of the district is included.

  • The statements in this short report are based entirely upon the information supplied by the Superphosphate Industry Committee, in connection with pyrite in the Iron King mine, Norseman, Western Australia. Testing, development work, and production are discussed.

  • The geophysical surveys reviewed in this report were part of an investigation carried out by the Commonwealth Government on behalf of the British Government. Deposits of uranium minerals occurring at several places in the Northern Flinders Ranges of South Australia, and centred about Mount Painter, were subjected to detailed geological examination followed by surface and underground prospecting by means of costeans, shafts, drives, etc. The geophysical work undertaken with the object of assisting the geological examination by measuring the radioactivity of rocks in situ and of hand specimens and assisting the prospecting work by making estimates of uranium content of mine samples. The geophysical surveys consisted of two main parts, namely, field surveys to locate and delineate areas of high radioactivity, and laboratory work to make approximate determinations of uranium content of mine samples by measuring the radiation from them. It is proposed to describe briefly the fundamental nature of radioactivity with specific reference to such features as have a particular bearing on the problems encountered in the field and assay work. In addition, it will be necessary to deal briefly with the geology of the various areas covered by the field work in so far as it effects the geophysical problems.

  • The pressure of the liquid, or reservoir pressure, within the glauconitic sandstone at Lakes Entrance has been the subject of conjecture in recent years and the low yields of oil which typify the field have been attributed by some observers to low reservoir pressure. Reservoir pressure, however, is only one of a number of factors upon which the rate of yield depends. Other factors of equal importance are the permeability of the producing formations and viscosity of the fluids produced. The methods, tests, and results involved with the determination of reservoir pressure from liquid level data are discussed in this report.