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  • The Lambert Graben is a deep crustal depression currently occupied by the Lambert Glacier and its tributaries. The mapped area extends from 76°S to 66°S and trends in a north north easterly direction, paralleling the direction of the graben.

  • The Larsemann Hills region is dominated by two major lithological associations, a Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic felsic dominated orthogneiss complex (Søstrene Orthogneiss) which occurs as basement to a sequence of pelitic, psammitic and felsic paragneisses (Brattstrand Paragneiss) and felsic intrusives. Recent unpublished data suggest a late Neoproterozoic depositional age for the Brattstrand Paragneiss. Current geochronology indicates that the region experienced medium to low pressure granulite-facies metamorphism during the Early Palaeozoic (~515-530 Ma). Although the paragneiss sequences record no evidence of earlier metamorphism, relics of a previous metamorphic event at ~1000-950 Ma are preserved in the Søstrene Orthogneiss. Within the Larsemann Hills region, the Early Palaeozoic event is characterised by peak metamorphism of ~7 kbar at ~800-850°C, with the post-peak evolution characterised by decompression, with some cooling, to 4 kbars at 750°C, then to 2-3 kbar at 600-650°C during final stages of orogenesis, with exhumation largely driven by crustal extension. Tectonic models generally argue for a continental-continental collisional scenario, with thermal input derived from a thinned mantle lithosphere.

  • The Stavely Project is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia and the Geological Survey of Victoria. During 2014 fourteen pre-competitive stratigraphic drill holes were completed in the prospective Stavely region in western Victoria in order to better understand subsurface geology and its potential for a variety of mineral systems. The Stavely region hosts several belts of poorly-exposed Cambrian volcanic and intrusive rocks, visible largely only in aeromagnetic data, which have similarities to those found in modern subduction-related tectonic settings. Mineralisation associated with porphyry Cu-Au and volcanic-hosted massive sulphide mineral systems is known where these rocks are exposed around Mount Stavely and the Black Range. However, despite a history of mineral exploration dating back to the late 1960s, significant economic deposits are yet to be discovered, and the Stavely region remains a greenfields terrane. Given the geological setting and known mineral potential, opportunity exists for the discovery of large mineral systems beneath extensive, but relatively thin, younger cover. The Stavely Project aims to provide the framework for discovery in the Stavely region primarily through the acquisition and delivery of pre-competitive geoscientific data. This includes the completion of pre-competitive stratigraphic drill holes in order to test regional geological interpretations and recover material for detailed lithological, petrophysical, geochemical and geochronological analysis. The results will assist in understanding the mineral systems potential of the Stavely region under cover. This report describes the logging methods and procedures used to produce lithology logs for stratigraphic drill holes completed as part of the Stavely Project. Data presented in this release include summary and detailed geological logs, logging metadata, and graphic geological logs. Also included are reports on biostratigraphic and palynological age constraints of unconsolidated drill core, and on volcanic facies observed in the volcanic rocks intersected during drilling.

  • This report summerises the kinds, sources, and handlers or processors of asbestos in Australia, 1944.

  • A geological investigation of the Maranboy Tin Field was commenced by officers of the Bureau of Mineral Resources in May, 1951. The object of the survey is, primarily, to obtain a detailed preliminary assessment of the potential ore reserves of the field. Geological mapping and sampling of the major lode lines has been carried out in an attempt to determine the features which control ore deposition and to enable estimates to be prepared of the grade and tonnage of ore per vertical foot, which may be expected from these lode lines. The main emphasis of this work during the 1951 field season was on the major producing lines in what has been called the Southern Field, the Main Lode and part of the Stannum King lode. In addition to this programme, an area of approximately nine square miles was mapped in detail using aerial photographs. Approximately 1,000 square miles of the area surrounding Maranboy was mapped on a regional basis. The history of the field, general geology, and the geology of the individual lodes are discussed in this report. The accompanying maps are enclosed.

  • The Stavely Project is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia and the Geological Survey of Victoria. During 2014 fourteen pre-competitive stratigraphic drill holes were completed in the prospective Stavely region in western Victoria in order to better understand subsurface geology and its potential for a variety of mineral systems. The Stavely region hosts several belts of poorly-exposed Cambrian volcanic and intrusive rocks, visible largely only in magnetic data, which have similarities to those found in modern subduction-related tectonic settings. Mineralisation associated with porphyry Cu-Au and volcanic-hosted massive sulphide mineral systems is known where these rocks are exposed around Mount Stavely and the Black Range. However, despite a history of mineral exploration dating back to the late 1960s, significant economic deposits are yet to be discovered, and the Stavely region remains a greenfields terrane. Given the geological setting and known mineral potential, opportunity exists for the discovery of large mineral systems beneath extensive, but relatively thin, younger cover. The Stavely Project aims to provide the framework for discovery in the Stavely region primarily through the acquisition and delivery of pre-competitive geoscientific data. This includes the completion of pre-competitive stratigraphic drill holes in order to test regional geological interpretations and recover material for detailed lithological, petrophysical, geochemical and geochronological analysis. The results will assist in understanding the mineral systems potential of the Stavely region under cover. This report summarises data collected in the field at the drill sites, either during or immediately following drilling, as part of the Stavely Project, and describes the methods and procedures used. Data presented in this release include drill hole collar information, operational metadata and daily drilling reports, drill core photographs, down-hole surveys, down-hole wireline geophysical logging results, down-hole temperature logging results, down-hole AutoSondeTM gamma data, Lab-at-RigTM X-ray fluorescence data, diamond drill core recovery percentages, and handheld magnetic susceptibility measurements on the drill core.

  • A short film describing the development of a prototype application for the Oculus Rift DK2 headset, to visualise subsurface geoscience data in situ. Synopsis: Visualisation and Science Promotion team members Michael de Hoog and Bobby Cerini visited Lake George in southern New South Wales, to demonstrate how the Oculus Rift is used to integrate subsurface resources data in situ with views of the landscape. In the opening sequence, Michael and Bobby set off across the dry lake bed. Michael is wearing the Oculus Rift headset while Bobby carries a laptop, containing georeferenced data previously gathered by Geoscience Australia. The headset has a camera attached to capture the view and enable tracking of Michael's head movements. The video shows what Michael is seeing as he looks around. Different data layers are shown being switched on and off, as Michael gazes at different parts of the landscape. The data are overlaid on the precise location within the landscape in which they were collected, including seismic line, volumes, gravity, magnetic and borehole data. The view changes to show Michael at the lakeside, wearing the Oculus Rift headset and looking at the wider landscape. Again the subsurface data is shown. The geographical extent of the data gathered in this area is revealed with Michael's head movements. A voiceover accompanying the movie describes the processes used to make the film and to show what the headset wearer sees. Script: Bobby Cerini, Michael de Hoog Data visualisation, application development: Michael de Hoog Cinematography, editing, audio: Michael O'Rourke Titles: Kath Hagan

  • Iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) mineral systems occur globally and range in age from Archean to Mesozoic or younger. An assessment for IOCG mineral system potential has been undertaken in the southern Arunta Region, incorporating the southern Aileron and northern Warumpi provinces. The assessment has been undertaken in a GIS-based environment using a mineral systems approach. This approach recognises four key system components: (1) sources of metals and fluids, (2) fluid-flow drivers, (3) fluid-flow pathways and architecture, and (4) depositional sites and mechanisms. For each of these key system components, mappable criteria were developed as proxies for mineralising processes in order to identify potential IOCG mineral systems. The locations of known deposits and prospects were not used for generating the assessment of IOCG potential. However, they are used as a validation of the results. The assessment largely reproduces the locations of known IOCG-style mineralisation, and predicts additional potential in a number of other areas, many of which are obscured by recent sedimentary cover. An approximately east-west-trending belt of broad IOCG potential has been identified, along with local regions of high potential where favourable criteria occur.

  • At its 4th meeting in Brisbane on 21st and 22nd August, the Copper and Bauxite Committee arranged a conference with Mr. J. Kruttschnitt, Managing Director of the Mt. Isa Mines, at which officers of the Department of Mines of Queensland were present, to discuss ways and means of quickly exploiting the recently indicated copper ore body situated in the Hanging Wall of the Black Star Lode at Mt. Isa Mine. At the request of the Committee, and following discussion of the details between all parties, Mr. Kruttschnitt made a proposal, which is submitted herewith.

  • The regolith-landform map - Glen Osmond, Adelaide Hills, 1:25,000 illustrates the distribution of regolith materials and the landforms on which they occur, described using the RTMAP scheme developed by Geoscience Australia