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  • Australia's Identified Mineral Resources is an annual nation-wide assessment of Australia's ore reserves and mineral resources.

  • Australia, from its known resources, cannot be regarded as being as well endowed with deposits of high-grade iron ore as are America, Europe and Asia. Australian iron ore resources consist of about 400 million tons of demonstrated reserves, about 200 million tons of inferred reserves, about 150 million tons of indicated and inferred marginal resources (of which about 130 million tons are inferred), and a comparatively large tonnage of latent resources (2,000 - 37000 million tons). The current annual rate of consumption is about 4 million tons, but this could conceivably rise to 9 million tons by 1970. Demonstrated reserves are sufficient for 30-40 years on the basis of the higher annual rate of consumption. Marginal and latent resources are potential ores only and may never become an economic source of iron. Iron ores are widely distributed throughout Australia and its Territories, but the bulk of production has come from the Middleback Ranges near Whyalla in South Australia, and Yampi Sound in Western Australia. Small production has come from other deposits including current production from Koolyanobbing, Western Austra

  • Geoscience Australia provides information on the nation's future capacity to produce mineral resources. Australia's Identified Mineral Resources is an annual nation-wide assessment of Australia's ore reserves and mineral resources. All major and a number of minor mineral commodities mined in Australia are assessed. It includes evaluation of long term trends, international rankings, summaries of significant exploration results, brief interviews of mining industry developments, and an analysis of mineral exploration expenditure across Australia. Australia's economic demonstrated resources (EDR) of the following mineral commodities increased during 2003 bauxite, copper, diamonds (both gem and industrial), ilmenite, lead, nickel, niobium, silver, tantalum, tin, zinc and zircon. EDR of black coal, iron ore, lithium, magnesite, manganese, platinum group metals, rare earth elements, rutile and uranium decreased during the year. EDR for brown coal, cobalt, gold, molybdenum, phosphate rock, shale oil, tungsten and vanadium remained at levels similar to those reported in 2002. Increases in EDR were due to ongoing drilling and evaluation of known deposits resulting in the transfer (re-assessment) of resources from inferred or sub-economic categories into EDR, and discoveries of new deposits or extensions of known deposits. The large increase in EDR for copper during the year resulted from a re-assessment of measured and indicated resources for Olympic Dam deposit (SA), and the discovery of additional economic resources at Mount Isa and Ernest Henry deposits (Qld). Decreases in EDR of black coal and iron ore during 2003 reflect increased rates of mine production. In addition, mining companies re-estimated their ore reserves and mineral resources more conservatively so as to comply with the requirements of the Australasian Code for Reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves (JORC Code).

  • Australia's mineral resources have been sustained at adequate levels, relative to production, through continued exploration at known deposits and successful exploration in greenfield regions. At a number of mines, resources have increased progressively despite mining over an extended period. Increased efficiencies in mining and processing, achieved through application of new technology, have resulted in higher recoveries of minerals from many deposits.

  • In 1992-93 the value of mineral exports was $29 748 million, which was almost 63% of all commodity exports for that year. Australia's gold and base metal resources in the Economic Demonstrated Resources (EDR) category increased significantly in 1993. In contrast, diamond EDR decreased substantially for both industrial and gem categories, but subeconomic resources for both categories rose sharply. Other major commodities such as bauxite, black coal, brown coal, iron are, manganese ore, mineral sands and nickel had minor or no change in EDR. During the past year there were successful exploration programs at many known deposits and in greenfield regions. At a number of mines resources were increased progressively despite mining over an extended period. Mineral exploration expenditure in Australia rose marginally in 1992-93 to $631.8 million, indicating some recovery from the downward trend of the last four years. Gold continued to be the main exploration target, attracting 50.7% of the total 1992-93 expenditure.

  • The mineral industry is an integral part of the Australian economy, generating $29,785 million in export revenue in the 1993-94 financial year. This was over 60% of all commodity exports for the year. Such an important contribution was possible because of the large and diverse resources that sustain the industry. Economic demonstrated resources (EDR) of several commodities, including gold, ilmenite, manganese, magnesite, zinc, tin and silver, rose substantially in 1994. EDR for cadmium, diamond and vanadium fell significantly, and for other commodities remained steady or showed minor variation over the year. Exploration expenditure continued to be dominated by the search for gold. Figures published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) show that in 1993-94, $793 million was spent on mineral exploration of which 57% was on gold. Expenditure on diamond exploration rose by 54% to $58 million. Successful exploration programs have maintained Australia's position as one of the world's premier resource nations despite continued high rates of production. Australia is one of the world's top six countries for resources of commodities as diverse as bauxite, bismuth, gold, mineral sands, lithium, iron ore, lead, silver, manganese, zinc, tantalum and uranium.

  • In 1996, Australia's Economic Demonstrated Resources (EDR) of cobalt, gold, nickel, phosphate rock and tantalum increased substantially, while EDR of bauxite, lead, lithium, platinum group metals (PGM), silver and zinc rose slightly. There was a significant reduction in EDR of gem and near gem diamond and industrial diamond due to ongoing high levels of production. Magnesite and tin EDR were also significantly reduced as a result of depletion due to production and reassessment of deposits. EDR of all other commodities remained unchanged or had minor reductions. Australia continues to rank highly as one of the world's leading mineral resource nations. It has the world's largest EDR of bauxite, lead, mineral sands (ilmenite, rutile and zircon), silver, tantalum, uranium and zinc. In addition, its EDR is in the top six worldwide for black coal, brown coal, cobalt, copper, gold, iron ore, lithium, manganese ore, nickel, rare earth oxides, gem and near gem diamond and industrial diamond. Mineral exploration expenditure rose by 7.5% in 1995-96 to $960.2 million from $893.3 million in the previous year. Increases were recorded in all states and the Northern Territory. Gold was again the main target, accounting for 57% of the total expenditure. In 1995-96 mineral resources exports increased to a new record of $34.7 billion (thousand million), a rise of 12.7% over the previous fiscal year. These export earnings comprised 60% of Australia's commodity exports, 45% of merchandise exports and 35% of the country's total exports of goods and services. The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) forecast export earnings to set a further record in 1996-97, rising by nearly 4% to over $36 billion.

  • A review of mineral exploration activity in Australia for 2009. This extended edition includes coverage reported in the shorter edition.

  • Reviews some of the typical mineral exploration results reported by companies in 2009. Brief overview of government programs to assist exploration. Listing of selected mineral discoveries since 2000. Overview of mineral exploration spending in Australia in 2009.

  • In 1998, Australia's economic demonstrated resources (EDR) of cobalt, copper, magnesite, gold, ilmenite, nickel, platinum group metals, tantalum and vanadium increased while those of diamond, iron ore, lead, manganese ore, lithium, silver, uranium, tin and zinc diminished. The reductions in EDR were due mainly to ongoing high levels of production; commodity prices were a subsidiary factor. EDR of all other commodities remained essentially unchanged. EDR of nickel and tantalum reached record levels in 1998. Gold increased slightly and maintained a flattening-off trend in EDR that has been evident since the mid-1990s. Black coal and bauxite EDR remained around levels established in the late 1980s and mid-1990s respectively. A decrease of almost 8% in iron ore EDR is attributable to production and a comprehensive review of resources information that became available during the year. Australia continues to rank highly as one of the world's leading mineral resource nations. It has the world's largest EDR of lead, mineral sands (ilmenite, rutile, and zircon), nickel, silver, tantalum, uranium and zinc. In addition, its EDR is in the top six worldwide for bauxite, black coal, brown coal, copper, cobalt, gold, iron ore, lithium, manganese ore, rare earth oxides, industrial diamond and vanadium.