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  • The Australian Geological Survey Organistaion (AGSO) has produced a set of digital bathymetry, gravity and magnetic grids for the southwest quadrant of Australia (24 - 46S, 106-140E), using all available land, marine and satellite data. The work was done in cooperation with Desmond Fitzgerald & Associates (DFA), and with significant bathymetric data input from the Australian Hydrographic Office (AHO). The results were obtained by performing a network adjustment on marine ship-track data, and combining these with onshore and satellite-derived data.

  • This dataset contains data collected on various domestic and international swath surveys in and around Australian waters.

  • Pacific island countries face a tsunami threat that consists of a complex mix of tsunamis from local, regional and distant sources. Assessment of risk on these islands requires the ability to model tsunami inundation, and such modelling is complicated by the fact that they are often surrounded by shallow coral reef systems whose influence on tsunami propagation is poorly understood. These islands also suffer from a lack of both bathymetry and topography data of sufficient resolution to accurately model tsunami inundation. Geoscience Australia and the Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission (SOPAC) have been developing a capacity for tsunami inundation modeling in support of risk assessment for Pacific islands that relies on remote sensing for nearshore bathymetric data coverage, including shallow reef platforms. This technique uses a physics-based modeling approach that estimates bathymetry from multispectral imagery, based on an optimisation driven per-pixel estimation of a set of environmental variables, including water column depth, from a semi-analytical expression of sub-surface remote sensing reflectance. Using this approach we have developed models for shallow bathymetry for off Nuku'alofa in Tongatapu and Gizo in the Solomon Islands, and merged these models with available swath bathymetry and global bathymetry data to produce bathymetry grids suitable for modelling tsunami inundation. We have attempted to validate these models against data for the 2006 Tonga (Mw=8.0) and 2007 Solomon Islands (MW=8.1) earthquakes, respectively.

  • This is a compilation of all the bathymetry data that GA holds in its database for the area that covers the Diamantina Fracture Zone to the Naturaliste Plateau. This dataset consist of different 6X4 degrees tiles that are: Tiles SI48,SJ48,SK48,SL48, SI47,SJ47, SK47,SL47, SJ46,SK46,SL46, SK45 and SL45)

  • ESRI Grids of available bathymetry within the bounds of proposed Marine Protected Areas in the Antarctic. Interpolated datasets are also included.

  • This product is no longer available.

  • Total contribution of six recently discovered submerged coral reefs in northern Australia to Holocene neritic CaCO3, CO2, and C is assessed to address a gap in global budgets. CaCO3 production for the reef framework and inter-reefal deposits is 0.26-0.28 Mt which yields 2.36-2.72 x105 mol yr-1 over the mid- to late-Holocene (<10.5 kyr BP); the period in which the reefs have been active. Holocene CO2 and C production is 0.14-0.16 Mt and 0.06-0.07 Mt, yielding 3.23-3.71 and 5.32-6.12 x105 mol yr-1, respectively. Coral and coralline algae are the dominant sources of Holocene CaCO3 although foraminifers and molluscs are the dominant constituents of inter-reefal deposits. The total amount of Holocene neritic CaCO3 produced by the six submerged coral reefs is several orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated using accepted CaCO3 production values because of very low production, a 'give-up' growth history, and presumed significant dissolution and exports. Total global contribution of submerged reefs to Holocene neritic CaCO3 is estimated to be 0.26-0.62 Gt or 2.55-6.17 x108 mol yr-1, which yields 0.15-0.37 Gt CO2 (3.48-8.42 x108 mol yr-1) and 0.07-0.17 Gt C (5.74-13.99 x108 mol yr-1). Contributions from submerged coral reefs in Australia are estimated to be 0.05 Gt CaCO3 (0.48 x108 mol yr-1), 0.03 Gt CO2 (0.65 x108 mol yr-1), and 0.01 Gt C (1.08 x108 mol yr-1) for an emergent reef area of 47.9 x103 km2. The dilemma remains that the global area and CaCO3 mass of submerged coral reefs are currently unknown. It is inevitable that many more submerged coral reefs will be found. Our findings imply that submerged coral reefs are a small but fundamental source of Holocene neritic CaCO3, CO2, and C that is poorly-quantified for global budgets.

  • Under the Australian Government's Energy Security Program, Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey and a marine reconnaissance survey to acquire new geophysical data and obtain geological samples in frontier basins along the southwest Australian continental margin. Specific areas of interest include the Mentelle Basin, northern Perth Basin, Wallaby Plateau and southern Carnarvon Basin. The regional seismic survey acquired 7300 km of industry-standard 2D reflection seismic data using an 8 km solid streamer and 12 second record length, together with gravity and magnetic data. These new geophysical datasets, together with over 7000 km of re-processed open-file seismic data, will facilitate more detailed mapping of the regional geology, determination of total sediment thickness, interpretation of the nature and thickness of crust beneath the major depocentres, modelling of the tectonic evolution, and an assessment of the petroleum prospectivity of frontier basins along the southwest margin. The scientific aim of the marine reconnaissance survey was to collect swath bathymetry, potential field data, geological samples and biophysical data. Together with the new seismic data, samples recovered from frontier basins will assist in understanding the geological setting and petroleum prospectivity of these underexplored areas.

  • Field and supplementary environmental data for the Marine Biodiversity Hub Description: The directory contains the following datasets. 1. Multibeam acoustic data (both backscatter and bathymetry) for three field areas: Jervis Bay, Carnarvon Shelf, and Southern Tasmanian Shelf. 2. Marine environmental data at the Australian continental scale. 3. Side scan data for three regions: Fitzroy, Jervis Bay and Keppel Bay. 4. CARS and Ocean Color datasets obtained from CSIRO. 5. AUV data for the Tasmanian survey (October 2008). These datasets were collected from various field surveys and project partners for the research of Marine Biodiversity Hub. Please contact the CERF project team for further information.

  • Interpretation report with SAR images across the Great Australian Bight region. Interpretation of anomalies including classification of natural hydrocarbon seepage; basic geographic, well location and seismic data coverages; images of bathymetric, gravimetric and magnetic data; integration of seepage interpretation with geology. Sale prices are listed on the marketing flyer and controlled by the established contractual arrangements, file 1999/743 and 98/580