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  • The Marine Survey Multibeam Bathymetry Web Map Service contains the highest-resolution multibeam bathymetry grids available for download on Geoscience Australia's website. These bathymetry grids were collected over numerous multibeam survey programs conducted in Australian mainland and Antarctic waters by both Geoscience Australia and our collaborators. Layers are grouped by survey or region and where available include both the Geoscience Australia and vessel survey identification numbers that contributed to the bathymetry grids. Bathymetry grids have been rendered over a rainbow colour-ramp with minimum and maximum depth values unique for each survey. These values are specified in each survey's layer description. The resolution of each bathymetry grid is also specified in each survey's layer description

  • The Mentelle Basin survey GA-0293, SS08/2005 was acquired by Geoscience Australia onboard the RV Southern Surveyor from the 28th of September to the 19th of October 2005. This deep water rift basin (up to 4500m depth) is located offshore from Fremantle on the SW Australian margin. The objectives of the survey was to study deep water marine habitats and to assess the petroleum potential of the Mentelle Basin. The swath data collected covered a new area of seabed that revealed the extents of the blind submarine canyons and completed the coverage of the Perth Canyon and filled the remaining gaps with high resolution swath bathymetry data.<p><p>This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.

  • The TOPAS Sea Trials survey GA-2361, was acquired by Geoscience Australia after the installation of the new Sub bottom profiler (TOPAS) onboard the RV Southern Surveyor during the 9th and the 10th of December 2004. The survey loacation was offshore Brisbane. The aim of the survey was to test the new sub bottom profiler installed onboard. The bathymetry grids consists of 5,10 and 40 resolution projected in Easting and Northing WGS84, UTM56S.<p><p>This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.

  • ESRI Grids of available bathymetry within the bounds of proposed Marine Protected Areas in the Antarctic. Interpolated datasets are also included.

  • This report presents the results of seabed mapping and habitat classification surveys completed in Darwin Harbour during 2011 and 2013 as part of the Northern Territory Government's marine habitat mapping program. This research aims to provide baseline data on the existing marine habitats and characteristics of the Darwin Harbour region. It is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Department of Land Resource Management (DLRM) and the Darwin Port Corporation. Key objectives are to: - Produce detailed maps of the bathymetry and derived parameters such as slope and rugosity, - Classify the seabed into areas of hard and soft substrate, and, - Produce seabed habitat maps (or seascapes). Data collection was completed in two stages comprising a multibeam survey, undertaken on the MV Matthew Flinders in 2011 by DLRMs predecessor, the Department of Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts and Sport (NRETAS), GA, AIMS and the Darwin Port Corporation; and, a seabed sampling survey undertaken in 2013 on the MV John Hickman, by DLRM and GA. Data acquired from the surveys included continuous high-resolution multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter, video and still camera observations of seabed habitats and biological communities, and physical samples of seabed sediments. Key outcomes from the surveys include: 1. Improved understanding of the seabed of Darwin Harbour. The main seabed geomorphic features identified in Darwin Harbour include banks, ridges, plains and scarps, and a deep central channel that divides into smaller and shallower channels. Acoustically hard substrates are found mostly on banks and are associated with rocky reef and sponge gardens, and are often overlain by a thin veneer of sandy sediment. In contrast, plains and channels are characterised by acoustically soft substrates and are associated with fine sediments (mud and sand). 2. Classification of physical seabed properties to produce a Seascape Map for Darwin Harbour. Six seascape classes (potential habitats) were derived using an Iterative Self Organising (ISO) unsupervised classification scheme. These six classes are related to statistically unique combinations of seabed substrate, relief, bedform and presence of sediment veneer (quite often inferred from presence of epibenthic biota). The results presented in this report demonstrate the utility of multibeam acoustic data to broadly and objectively characterise the seabed to describe the spatial distribution of key benthic habitats. This is particularly important technique in high-turbidity settings such as Darwin Harbour where the application of satellite and aerial remote sensing techniques can be limited. The results of this study will be used for the planning and analysis of data from upcoming benthic biodiversity studies as they: - Provide robust near-continuous physical variables that can be used to predictive modelling of biodiversity; - Provide high-resolution coverage of near-continuous variables that describe the key physical characteristic of the seabed of the harbour, and; - Enhance survey sample design by providing indicative locations of likely similar biology communities.

  • The Murray Canyons are a group of deeply-incised submarine canyons on a steep 400-km section of the continental slope off Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Some of the canyons are amongst the largest on Earth. The canyons, some 80 km long, descend from the shelf edge to abyssal plain 5200 m deep. Sprigg Canyon, the deepest and one of the largest, has walls 2 km high. The thalwegs of the larger canyons are concave in profile, steepest on the upper continental slope (15?-30?), with about 4?gradient on the mid slope, then level out on the lower slope to merge with the 1? continental rise. Between canyons, the continental slope is slightly convex to linear with a gradient of about 5?-6?. Canyon walls commonly slope at 15?-22?. The passive continental margin narrows to 65-km at the Murray Canyons and links the Bight and Otway Basins. WNW-trending Jurassic-Cretaceous rift structures control the irregular shape of the central canyons. At the western end, large box canyons 1 km deep are incised into thick sediments of the Ceduna Sub-basin. Formed by headscarp erosion, some of these canyons have coalesced by canyon capture. The upper parts of most canyons are cut into Cretaceous sediments and in some places are floored by basement rocks. Large holes, spaced about 5 km apart and up to several hundred metres deep, along the outlet channels of the larger and steeper canyons were probably gouged by turbidity currents resulting from major slope failures at the shelf edge. Quaternary turbidites were deposited on the abyssal plain more than 100 km from the foot of slope. Canyon down-cutting was episodic since the latest Cretaceous, with peak activity since the Oligocene due to strong glacioeustatic fluctations and cycles, with canyon development occurring during lowstands and early transgressions when sediment input at the shelf edge was usually highest. The timing of canyon development is linked to major unconformities within adjacent basins, with down-cutting events recorded or inferred during early Paleocene, Middle Eocene, Early Oligocene, Oligocene/Miocene transition (~24 Ma), mid Miocene (~14 Ma) and latest Miocene-Pleistocene. The early phases involved only siliciclastic sediments, while post-early Eocene canyon cutting was dominated by biogenic carbonates generated on the shelf and upper continental slope. The Murray River dumped its sediment load directly into Sprigg Canyon during extreme lowstands of the Late Pleistocene when the Lacepede Shelf was dry land.

  • <p>Australia has established a network of 58 marine parks within Commonwealth waters covering a total of 3.3 million square kilometres, or 40 per cent of our exclusive economic zone (excluding Australian Antarctic Territory). These parks span a range of settings, from near coastal and shelf habitats to abyssal plains. Parks Australia manages the park network through management plans that came into effect for all parks on 1 July 2018. Geoscience Australia is contributing to their management by collating and interpreting existing environmental data, and through the collection of new marine data. “Eco-narrative” documents are being developed for those parks, where sufficient information is available, delivering collations and interpretations of seafloor geomorphology, oceanography and ecology. Many of these interpretations rely on bathymetric grids and their derived products, including those in this data release. <p>Bathymetry grids: <p>The bathymetry of the marine parks was created by compiling and processing Geoscience Australia’s bathymetry data holding gridded at the optimum resolution depending of the vessel’s sonar system. <p>The bathymetry of the park is illustrated by a panchromatic geotiff image, developed by combining the bathymetric data with a hillshade image. <p> Morphological Surfaces: <p>Geoscience Australia has developed a new marine seafloor classification scheme, which uses the two-part seafloor mapping morphology approach of Dove et al (2016). This new scheme is semi-hierarchical and the first step divides the slope of the seafloor into three Morphological Surface categories (Plain, <2°; Slope, 2-10°; Escarpment, >10°). <p>Dove, D., Bradwell, T., Carter, G., Cotterill, C., Gafeira, J., Green, S., Krabbendam, M., Mellet, C., Stevenson, A., Stewart, H., Westhead, K., Scott, G., Guinan, J., Judge, M. Monteys, X., Elvenes, S., Baeten, N., Dolan, M., Thorsnes, T., Bjarnadóttir, L., Ottesen, D. (2016). Seabed geomorphology: a twopart classification system. British Geological Survey, Open Report OR/16/001. 13 pages. <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.<p><p>This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.

  • This web service displays the results of a marine survey conducted by Geoscience Australia in Commonwealth waters of the north-eastern Browse Basin (Caswell Sub-basin) between 9 October and 9 November 2014. The additional codes GA-0345 and GA-0346 refer to Geoscience Australia (GA) internal codes and TAN1411 is the vessel survey number given by the RV Tangaroa for 2014.

  • This web service combines two surveys GA-4415 and GA-0348. The Casey Station Bathymetry survey displays one seamless bathymetry grid of 1m resolution. Further details of the data lineage can be found with the associated database. This web service is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia.

  • <p>Australia has established a network of 58 marine parks within Commonwealth waters covering a total of 3.3 million square kilometres, or 40 per cent of our exclusive economic zone (excluding Australian Antarctic Territory). These parks span a range of settings, from near coastal and shelf habitats to abyssal plains. Parks Australia manages the park network through management plans that came into effect for all parks on 1 July 2018. Geoscience Australia is contributing to their management by collating and interpreting existing environmental data, and through the collection of new marine data. “Eco-narrative” documents are being developed for those parks, where sufficient information is available, delivering collations and interpretations of seafloor geomorphology, oceanography and ecology. Many of these interpretations rely on bathymetric grids and their derived products, including those in this data release. <p>Bathymetry grids <p>The bathymetry of the marine parks was created by compiling and processing Geoscience Australia’s bathymetry data holding gridded at the optimum resolution depending of the vessel’s sonar system. <p>The bathymetry of the park is illustrated by a panchromatic geotiff image, developed by combining the bathymetric data with a hillshade image. <p> Morphological Surfaces <p>Geoscience Australia has developed a new marine seafloor classification scheme, which uses the two-part seafloor mapping morphology approach of Dove et al (2016). This new scheme is semi-hierarchical and the first step divides the slope of the seafloor into three Morphological Surface categories (Plain, <2°; Slope, 2-10°; Escarpment, >10°). <p>Dove, D., Bradwell, T., Carter, G., Cotterill, C., Gafeira, J., Green, S., Krabbendam, M., Mellet, C., Stevenson, A., Stewart, H., Westhead, K., Scott, G., Guinan, J., Judge, M. Monteys, X., Elvenes, S., Baeten, N., Dolan, M., Thorsnes, T., Bjarnadóttir, L., Ottesen, D. (2016). Seabed geomorphology: a twopart classification system. British Geological Survey, Open Report OR/16/001. 13 pages. <p>This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.<p><p>This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.