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  • This black and white resource helps you to incorporate easily understood aspects of science and technology into your Gold Rush lessons. The Science of Gold is a 17 page booklet with student activities. Suitable for primary level Years K-6 and secondary level Years 7-8.

  • A 2-D crustal velocity model has been derived from a 1997 364 km north-south wide-angle seismic profile that passed from Ordovician volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks (Molong Volcanic Belt of the Macquarie Arc) in the north, across the Lachlan Transverse Zone into Ordovician turbidites and Early Devonian intrusive granitoids in the south. The Lachlan Transverse Zone is a proposed west-northwest to east-southeast structural feature in the Eastern Lachlan Orogen and is considered to be a possible early lithospheric feature controlling structural evolution in eastern Australia; its true nature, however, is still contentious. The velocity model highlights significant north to south lateral variations in subsurface crustal architecture in the upper and middle crust. In particular, a higher P-wave velocity (6.24-6.32 km/s) layer identified as metamorphosed arc rocks (sensu lato) in the upper crust under the arc at 5-15 km depth is juxtaposed against Ordovician craton-derived turbidites by an inferred south-dipping fault that marks the southern boundary of the Lachlan Transverse Zone. Near-surface P-wave velocities in the Lachlan Transverse Zone are markedly less than those along other parts of the profile and some of these may be attributed to mid-Miocene volcanic centres. In the middle and lower crust there are poorly defined velocity features that we infer to be related to the Lachlan Transverse Zone. The Moho depth increases from 37 km in the north to 47 km in the south, above an underlying upper mantle with a P-wave velocity of 8.19 km/s. Comparison with velocity layers in the Proterozoic Broken Hill Block supports the inferred presence of Cambrian oceanic mafic volcanics (or an accreted mafic volcanic terrane) as substrate to this part of the Eastern Lachlan Orogen. Overall, the seismic data indicate significant differences in crustal architecture between the northern and southern parts of the profile. The crustal-scale P-wave velocity differences are attributed to the different early crustal evolution processes north and south of the Lachlan Transverse Zone.

  • <p>The Oils of Australia Series comprises a trilogy of reports on the molecular (biomarker) and isotopic fingerprinting of Australia's oils and condensates compiled by Geoscience Australia and GeoMark Research of Houston. The series includes The Oils of Western Australia I (1996), The Oils of Eastern Australia (2002) and The Oils of Western Australia II (2005). <p>These studies have geochemically characterised Australia's petroleum accumulations into genetically related families. These data sets provide the exploration industry with an understanding of the petroleum systems operating in Australia's basins, and indicate their importance to future exploration.

  • This report is published in two volumes; Volume I: Bowen-Surat and Cooper-Eromanga Basins, Volume II: Gippsland, Bass, Otway, Stansbury, McArthur, Amadeus, Adavale, Galilee and Drummond Basins. Following the basin-by-basin analysis of geochemical characteristics of eastern Australia's oils, a selection of oils that best represented the major families of each region were selected. These oils were statistically analysed using a subset of geochemical (OilMod) parameters derived from GC, GC-MS and carbon isotopic analyses. This exercise was intended to display the variability in oil compositions across the whole of the eastern part of the continent. The chemical classification of oils follows closely upon, and verifies the analysis based on, palaeogeography and the supersystem concepts.

  • Ocean margins are the transitional zones between the oceans and continents. They represent dynamic systems in which numerous processes shape the environment and result in impacting the utilization and hazard potentials for humans. These processes are influenced by a variety of steering mechanisms, from mountain building and climate on the land to tectonics and sea-level fluctuations in ocean margins. This book examines various aspects of regulation for the long-term development of ocean margins, of the impact of fluids and of the dynamics of benthic life at and below the seafloor in ocean margin systems.

  • The Archean Pilbara granitoid-greenstone terrane (GGT) has been the focus of numerous studies on Archaean geology, especially the classic dome-and-basin area around Marble Bar in the east Pilbara. This area has been used as evidence for different tectonic processes, i.e. that vertical tectonics or diapirism was a cause for Archean deformation. This paper provides evidence to support regional horizontal (plate-interaction) stresses as being largely responsible for the compressive deformation of the Pilbara GGT, at least from ca. 3.2 Ga. The relative chronology of meso-to macro-scale structural elements are presented for a number of selected areas across the Pilbara GGT. These locally identified events are correlated with a regional (Pilbara-wide) structural framework of deformation events that are constrained by geochronological and stratigraphic controls. The dome-and-basin geometry characteristic of the east Pilbara was established after 3.2 Ga, and was successively modified by repeated orthogonal extensional and compressive (subhorizontal) events. The result has been a locally complex development of polyphase structural elements with consistent overprinting relationships that can be correlated across much of the Pilbara from 3.2 Ga. Diapirism did not cause these deformation elements, although it may have modified them.

  • This map is part of the series that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and 110 kilometres from north to south. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. The topographic map and data index shows coverage of the sheets. Product Specifications Coverage: The series covers the whole of Australia with 513 maps. Currency: Ranges from 1995 to 2009. 95% of maps have a reliability date of 1994 or later. Coordinates: Geographical and either AMG or MGA (post-1993) Datum: AGD66, GDA94, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Paper, flat and folded copies.

  • This map is part of the series that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and 110 kilometres from north to south. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. The topographic map and data index shows coverage of the sheets. Product Specifications Coverage: The series covers the whole of Australia with 513 maps. Currency: Ranges from 1995 to 2009. 95% of maps have a reliability date of 1994 or later. Coordinates: Geographical and either AMG or MGA (post-1993) Datum: AGD66, GDA94, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Paper, flat and folded copies.