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  • This service provides Australian surface hydrology, including natural and man-made features such as water courses (including directional flow paths), lakes, dams and other water bodies. The information was derived from the Surface Hydrology database, with a nominal scale of 1:250,000. The National Basins and Catchments are a national topographic representation of drainage areas across the landscape. Each basin is made up of a number of catchments depending on the features of the landscape. This service shows the relationship between catchments and basins. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • This service includes world bathymetry, elevation (hillshade), and satellite imagery data, and ocean, country, population and natural features. The information was derived from various sources, including Natural Earth and Landsat Imagery. It is a cached service with a Web Mercator Projection. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • The large tsunami disasters of the last two decades have highlighted the need for a thorough understanding of the risk posed by relatively infrequent but disastrous tsunamis and the importance of a comprehensive and consistent methodology for quantifying the hazard. In the last few years, several methods for probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis have been developed and applied to different parts of the world. In an effort to coordinate and streamline these activities and make progress towards implementing the Sendai Framework of Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR) we have initiated a Global Tsunami Model (GTM) working group with the aim of i) enhancing our understanding of tsunami hazard and risk on a global scale and developing standards and guidelines for it, ii) providing a portfolio of validated tools for probabilistic tsunami hazard and risk assessment at a range of scales, and iii) developing a global tsunami hazard reference model. This GTM initiative has grown out of the tsunami component of the Global Assessment of Risk (GAR15), which has resulted in an initial global model of probabilistic tsunami hazard and risk. Started as an informal gathering of scientists interested in advancing tsunami hazard analysis, the GTM is currently in the process of being formalized through letters of interest from participating institutions. The initiative has now been endorsed by UNISDR and GFDRR. We will provide an update on the state of the project and the overall technical framework, and discuss the technical issues that are currently being addressed, including earthquake source recurrence models and the use of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty, and preliminary results for a global hazard assessment which is an update of that included in UNIDSDR GAR15.

  • Exploring for the Future (EFTF) is a four-year geoscience data and information collection programme that aims to better understand on a regional scale the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources concealed under cover in northern Australia and parts of South Australia. This factsheet explains one of the activities being undertaken to collect this data and information.

  • The Antarctic field notebooks contain the geological observations recorded by Bureau of Mineral Resources geologists during their trips to Antarctica. These csv files are the copies of the transcriptions made on the DigiVol transcription platform with the TEI tags removed. Please see the README file for full details. Also see HPRM8/TRIM folder A17/764 for full documentation about the project. These are the csv files that are used in the Biodiversity Heritage Library copy of the notebooks.

  • The data covers an area of approximately 8500 sq km in the Darling river catchment area, located between Bourke, NSW and Wilcannia, NSW. A set of seamless products were produced including hydro-flattened bare earth DEMs, DSMs, Canopy Height Models (CHM) and Foliage Cover Models (FCM). The outputs of the project are compliant with National ICSM LiDAR Product Specifications and the NEDF.

  • This report outlines geoscientific advice relating to the management of Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA) No. 143, Marine Plain, in the Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica. The advice is based on expert geoscientific interpretation of the relevant literature relating to human disturbance in polar environments. No field observations or experiments were undertaken as part of the preparation of this advice.

  • The Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator the Hon Matthew Canavan, formally released the 2016 offshore areas for petroleum exploration on insert date here. The 28 areas are located on the North West Shelf in the Bonaparte, Browse, Roebuck, offshore Canning and Northern Carnarvon basins (Figure 1). Competitive work-program bidding for exploration permits will apply, except for three selected areas which are released under the cash-bidding scheme. These are located in the inboard part of the Northern Carnarvon Basin, where existing hydrocarbon discoveries are currently in production and where complete coverage of 3D-seismic data exists.

  • Contains Events, arrivals, locations and other eqfocus results tables, for the South Australian Government Seismic Network

  • A benthic sediment sampling survey (GA0356) to the nearshore areas of outer Darwin Harbour was undertaken in the period from 03 July to 14 September 2016. Partners involved in the survey included Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources within the Northern Territory Government (NT DENR) (formerly the Department of Land and Resource Management (DLRM)). This survey forms part of a four year (2014-2018) science program aimed at improving knowledge about the marine environments in the regions around Darwin and Bynoe Harbour’s through the collection and collation of baseline data that will enable the creation of thematic habitat maps to underpin marine resource management decisions. This project is being led by the Northern Territory Government and is supported by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project, in collaboration with - and co-investment from GA and AIMS. The program builds upon an NT Government project (2011-2011) which saw the collection of baseline data (multibeam echosounder data, sediment samples and video transects) from inner Darwin Harbour (Siwabessy et al. 2015). This dataset comprises sediment oxygen demand measurements on seabed sediments. Radke, L., Smit, N., Li, J., Nicholas, T., Picard, K. 2017. Outer Darwin Harbour Shallow Water Sediment Survey 2016: GA0356 – Post-survey report. Record 2017/06. Geoscience Australia, Canberra. http://dx.doi.org/10.11636/Record.2017.006 This research was funded by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project via the Northern Territory (NT) Government Department of Land Resource Management (DLRM) (now the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)), and co-investment from Geoscience Australia (GA) and Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). We are grateful to the following agencies for providing boats and staff, and to the following personal for help with sample acquisition: NT DENR (Danny Low Choy and Rachel Groome), NT Fisheries (Wayne Baldwin, Quentin Allsop, Shane Penny, Chris Errily, Sean Fitzpatrick and Mark Grubert), NT Parks and Wildlife (Ray Chatto, Stewart Weorle, and Luke McLaren) and the Larrakia Rangers (Nelson Tinoco, Kyle Lewfat, Alan Mummery and Steven Dawson). Special thanks to the skippers Danny Low Choy, Wayne Baldwin, Stewart Weorle and Luke McLaren whose seamanship strongly guided the execution of this survey. AIMS generously allowed use of the aquarium and laboratory at the Arafura Timor Sea Research Facility, and Simon Harries and Kirsty McAllister helped with the setup. We would also like to acknowledge and thank GA colleagues including: Matt Carey, Ian Atkinson and Craig Wintle (Engineering and Applied Scientific Services) for the organisation of field supplies and the design of the new core incubation set-up. This dataset is published with the permission of the CEO, Geoscience Australia