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  • Provisions for the award of a Retention Lease were added in 1985 to the Petroleum (Submerged Land) Act 1967 to provide security of title for offshore petroleum accumulations that are less than commercial but are likely to become commercially viable within 15 years. Of the Retention Leases granted to date, about 50 have been awarded over gas accumulations and about 10 have been awarded over oil accumulations. In addition, several Retention Lease applications are currently under consideration. A limited number of Retention Leases have been converted to Production Licences. Thus, the number of stranded accumulations held within Retention Leases is increasing. Retention Leases now cover an area of approximately 17,000 square km, which is larger than the area of the Barrow or Dampier Sub-basin, offshore Western Australia. Jurassic or Triassic sandstones of the Westralian Super-basin constitute the primary petroleum reservoirs in the overwhelming majority of the stranded accumulations. In many instances, remoteness from infrastructure and deep water are the main factors that give rise to the perception that an accumulation is stranded. However, a close examination of Australian stranded accumulations indicates that insufficient geological and reservoir engineering knowledge is also often the reason why the accumulations are not considered commercially viable. Lack of reliable information on gross rock volume, lateral continuity, net pay, hydrocarbon saturation, hydrocarbon-water contact and flow potential is common. Seven and eleven exploration wells had been drilled on the gross geological structures of North Rankin and Goodwyn respectively, before decisions on LNG development were made. In contrast, few appraisal wells have been drilled on many stranded accumulations. Adequate appraisal work in conjunction with marketing efforts is necessary to monetise these accumulations. Provisions for the award of a Retention Lease were added in 1985 to the Petroleum (Submerged Land) Act 1967 to provide security of title for offshore petroleum accumulations that are less than commercial but are likely to become commercially viable within 15 years. Of the Retention Leases granted to date, about 50 have been awarded over gas accumulations and about 10 have been awarded over oil accumulations. In addition, several Retention Lease applications are currently under consideration. A limited number of Retention Leases have been converted to Production Licences. Thus, the number of stranded accumulations held within Retention Leases is increasing. Retention Leases now cover an area of approximately 17,000 square km, which is larger than the area of the Barrow or Dampier Sub-basin, offshore Western Australia. Jurassic or Triassic sandstones of the Westralian Super-basin constitute the primary petroleum reservoirs in the overwhelming majority of the stranded accumulations. In many instances, remoteness from infrastructure and deep water are the main factors that give rise to the perception that an accumulation is stranded. However, a close examination of Australian stranded accumulations indicates that insufficient geological and reservoir engineering knowledge is also often the reason why the accumulations are not considered commercially viable. Lack of reliable information on gross rock volume, lateral continuity, net pay, hydrocarbon saturation, hydrocarbon-water contact and flow potential is common. Seven and eleven exploration wells had been drilled on the gross geological structures of North Rankin and Goodwyn respectively, before decisions on LNG development were made. In contrast, few appraisal wells have been drilled on many stranded accumulations. Adequate appraisal work in conjunction with marketing efforts is necessary to monetise these accumulations.

  • At this scale 1cm on the map represents 1km on the ground. Each map covers a minimum area of 0.5 degrees longitude by 0.5 degrees latitude or about 54 kilometres by 54 kilometres. The contour interval is 20 metres. Many maps are supplemented by hill shading. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours, localities and some administrative boundaries. Product Specifications Coverage: Australia is covered by more than 3000 x 1:100 000 scale maps, of which 1600 have been published as printed maps. Unpublished maps are available as compilations. Currency: Ranges from 1961 to 2009. Average 1997. Coordinates: Geographical and either AMG or MGA coordinates. Datum: AGD66, GDA94; AHD Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator UTM. Medium: Printed maps: Paper, flat and folded copies. Compilations: Paper or film, flat copies only.

  • Associated with the endeavours of geoscientists to pursue the promise that geological storage of CO2 has of potentially making deep cuts into greenhouse gas emissions, Governments around the world are dependent on reliable estimates of CO2 storage capacity and insightful indications of the viability of geological storage in their respective jurisdictions. Similarly, industry needs reliable estimates for business decisions regarding site selection and development. If such estimates are unreliable, and decisions are made based on poor advice, then valuable resources and time could be wasted. Policies that have been put in place to address CO2 emissions could be jeopardised. CO2 storage capacity estimates can be presented within a resource pyramid; with Theoretical, Realistic and Viable categories. Estimates need to clearly state the limitations that existed (data, time, knowledge) at the time of making the assessment and indicate the purpose and future use to which the estimates should be applied. Few of the existing CO2 storage capacity estimates around the world have sufficient detail and consistency to allow comparison and collation of the data in a reliable manner. Trapping processes associated with CO2 storage are complex, sometimes are mutually exclusive, and often are time dependent. A set of guidelines for documenting storage capacity estimates have been suggested to assist future deliberations by government and industry on the appropriateness of geological storage of CO2 in different geological settings and political jurisdictions. This work has been initiated under the auspices of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (www.cslforum.org), and it is an ongoing taskforce which will continue to examine issues associated with storage capacity estimation.

  • Protoliths of the Strangways Metamorphic Complex (SMC) in the Arunta Region of central Australia are dated to the 1810-1800 Ma Stafford magmatic event by SHRIMP U-Pb dating of igneous cores within granulite grade metamorphic zircons. Detrital zircons preserved in an associated metasediment have a provenance age spectrum similar to that in the Lander Package sedimentary rocks which are widespread in the region. The onset and duration of granulite facies metamorphism is recorded differentially across the SMC depending on lithology, varying mechanisms of metamorphic zircon crystallisation, and specific P-T-t paths experienced by different sectors of the complex. The earliest recorded thermal process is anatectic partial melting in the Kanandra Granulite at 1734 ± 3 Ma; zircon crystallisation from melt is indicated later at Edwards Creek (1716 ± 3 Ma) and Coles Hill (1708 ± 6 Ma). Later overgrowths indicate renewed metamorphic zircon precipitation in the Kanandra Granulite, probably from fluids, as late as ca. 1690 Ma. A 50 Myr continuum of metamorphic zircon ages, from ca. 1740-1690 Ma, is recorded in a single rock at Utnalanama and attributed to prolonged solid-state metamorphic zircon formation. The Strangways Event was not a transient and discrete process with a single age. There is evidence for prolonged residence at granulite facies conditions, with both discrete crystallisation events, and prolonged crystallisation responses, in different locations. Termination of the high grade metamorphism coincided with the local intrusion of a dolerite dyke swarm at 1689 ± 8 Ma. The Strangways Event coincides with the segment between prominent bends B0 and B1 of the Australian Palaeomagnetic Polar Wander Path, relating the thermal process to major direction changes in the movement of the north Australian plate. The geographic distribution of high grade metamorphism within the SMC, shallow-crust emplacement of magmas in the Tennant Region, and a low-temperature Ar isotope record in the Tanami Region, is consistent with effects propogating northwards from a plate boundary south of the SMC. Lamprophyre intrusions implicate subduction-modified mantle and the prolonged Strangways Event is probably a record of collisions or direction changes during north-directed subduction under the area.

  • The thermal event represented by the S-type Ngadarunga Granite in the western Arunta Region is constrained at 1803 ± 6 Ma from the crystallisation age of metamorphic zircon within adjacent Lander Package metasedimentary rocks. The granite crystallised no magmatic zircon, but does contain abundant inherited zircons whose age spectrum matches that of detrital grains in the adjacent partially melted sedimentary rocks. This provides the oldest age constraint on deformation in the Arunta Region, and on the region-wide unconformity separating the Lander Package from overlying Reynolds Range Group. Detrital zircon grains in the Lander Package were derived from a provenance dominated by 1840-1880 Ma crystalline rocks, inferring that the Arunta Region was a basin marginal to earlier continental crust of that age during deposition of the Lander basin phase.

  • Sketch map of part of the Queensland coastline produced for Australian Broadcasting Commission program Four Corners. It is intended for internal use only and is not for sale to the general public.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.

  • This data is part of the series of maps that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Data is downloadable in various distribution formats.