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  • A collection of NetCDF files containing ground gravity point data that is organised by survey. The files are derived from the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD), and formatted in such a way as to provide highly efficient, analysis ready data. The data covers the onshore Australian continent, and dates from 1947 until June 2019. Surveys acquired after June 2019 are not included in this collection, but are available via the Data & Publication search or the Geophysical Archiving and Data Delivery System (GADDS).

  • The collection includes 17,247 measurements of temperature and temperature gradients collected down 5513 individual wells. This information formed the basis for the 'OZTemp Interpreted Temperature at 5km Depth' image of Australia <b>Value: </b>These observations are used to assess heat flow which can be used to infer deep geologic structure, which is valuable for exploration and reconstructions of Australia's evolution <b>Scope: </b>Nationwide collection corresponding to accessible boreholes and published measurements

  • Geoscience Australia (GA) has created a unique collection of 3D structural and geological models and model inputs for Australia and its near shore regions. Currently the collection contains a variety of 3D volumetric models and surfaces that were produced for specific projects at regional to continental scale. The approximately 40 regional scale models in the collection cover roughly 1/3 of the Australian continent. The models capture 3D stratigraphy and architecture, including the depth to bedrock and the locations of different major rock units, faults and geological structures. The geologic models represent the integration of geophysical surveys, seismic surveys, borehole data, field geology, and geochemical data, the majority of which will now be available through this and other RDSI collections. In their current form, the 3D models provide a valuable input to simulations of geological processes. However, the plan over time is to use the HPC capability at NCI and the large storage volumes available to dynamically integrate the various models and geological, geochemical and geophysical derivative products to then create a unified 3D model for the entire continent. Separately and then cumulatively, these models will provide an important new basis for describing and understanding Australia's geologic evolution and resource wealth. Currently there are no international open standards for the development and storage of 3D geological models, which is why they are difficult to integrate or stitch into nationally integrated data sets. The lack of consistency of the models means that each has to be transformed into formats compatible with existing HP modelling and simulation software. It is hoped that through exposing these 3D geological models into a HP collaborative environment that this will foster and accelerate the development of international standards and tools necessary for the assimilation of 3D geological models into a variety of HP programs. <b> Note: This record has been superseded by eCat 144629:</b> - <a href="https://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/144629">https://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/144629</a>

  • This data collection is comprised of radiometric (gamma-ray spectrometric) surveys acquired across Australia by Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory governments and the private sector with project management and quality control undertaken by Geoscience Australia. The radiometric method measures naturally occurring radioactivity arising from gamma-rays. In particular, the method is able to identify the presence of the radioactive isotopes potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The measured radioactivity is then converted into concentrations of the radioelements K, U and Th in the ground. Radiometric surveys have a limited ability to see into the subsurface with the measured radioactivity originating from top few centimetres of the ground. These surveys are primarily used as a geological mapping tool as changes in rock and soil type are often accompanied by changes in the concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of K, U and Th. The method is also capable of directly detecting mineral deposits. For example, K alteration can be detected using the radiometric method and is often associated with hydrothermal ore deposits. Similarly, the method is also used for U and Th exploration, heat flow studies, and environmental mapping purposes such as characterising surface drainage features. The instrument used in radiometric surveys is a gamma-ray spectrometer. This instrument measures the number of radioactive emissions (measured in counts per second) and their energies (measured in electron volts (eV)). Radiometric data are simultaneously acquired with magnetic data during airborne surveys and are a non-invasive method for investigating near-surface geology and regolith.

  • The national Marine Sediments collection is a scientific resource that includes information for samples collected within the Australian marine jurisdiction, including location, water depth, sampling method and sample descriptions. Data are provided from quantitative analyses of the samples, such as grain size, mud, sand, gravel and carbonate concentrations. Additional analyses on some samples include mineralogy, age determinations, geochemical properties, and physical attributes for down-core samples including bulk density, p-wave velocity, porosity and magnetic susceptibility. Images and graphics are presented, where available. MARS currently holds >40,000 sample and sub-sample records, and approximately 200,000 records describing the characteristics of these samples. New data are being added as they become available. <b>Value: </b>Seabed sediment data is used to characterise the surface geology of the sea floor, important in resource exploration, marine zone management and understanding the physical environment. <b>Scope: </b>Samples were collected from Australia's marine jurisdiction, including the Australian Antarctic Territory. >40,000 sample and sub-sample records, and approximately 200,000 records describing the characteristics of these samples.

  • Delineation of Australia's domestic and international maritime limits and boundaries. These boundaries include a variety of jurisdictional, economic, regulatory and legal boundaries. <b>Value:</b> Used by national governments, businesses, organisations in determining boundaries for zones governed/managed by different regulatory structures/requirements. <b>Scope:</b> A national dataset at resolution relevant for presentation of regional spatial data such as digital maps or regional decision making.

  • Although the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics was created in 1946, it did not compile an annual report until 1971. The series continued under this title up to 1976, all but the last providing summaries of annual activities by broad sections (functions and organisation, field operations, laboratory studies, observatories, and so on). The 1976 Annual Report adopted a shorter format, a general outline of the role, objectives and programs of the Bureau being followed by a selection of short articles on the "more innovative and conclusive activities" of that year. This new format was retained in 1977 when a title change was made and the annual summaries became known as BMR Yearbooks.

  • On behalf of Australia, and in support of the Malaysian accident investigation, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) led search operations for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 in the Southern Indian Ocean. Geoscience Australia provided advice, expertise and support to the ATSB to facilitate marine surveys, which were undertaken to provide a detailed map of the sea floor topography to aid navigation during the underwater search. Prior to the Phase 1 bathymetric survey, very little was known about the sea floor in the MH370 search area, as few marine surveys have taken place in the area. Existing maps of the sea floor were coarse, having been derived from satellites and only providing a general indication of water depth. Before the underwater search for MH370 could begin, it was necessary to accurately map the sea floor to ensure that the search was undertaken safely and effectively. Survey vessels spent months at sea, scanning the sea floor with multibeam sonar and side scan sonar to gather detailed, high-resolution data. This collation of datasets on the National Computational Infrastructure contains the high resolution raw and processed data acquired during Phase 2 of the search for MH370 as received by third party operators. The Phase 2 underwater search data was acquired by multiple vessels, including the Fugro Equator, Fugro Supporter, Fugro Discovery, Havila Harmony, Dong Hai Jiu 101 and Go Phoenix. Surveys were conducted using towed and autonomous underwater vehicles between September 2014 to January 2017, collecting over 121,000 square kilometres of high resolution data in the search area. All material and data from this access point is subject to copyright. Please note the creative commons copyright notice and relating to the re-use of this material. Geoscience Australia's preference is that you attribute the datasets (and any material sourced from it) using the following wording: Source: Governments of Australia, Malaysia and the People's Republic of China, 2018. MH370 Phase 2 data - Raw and processed. For additional assistance, please contact marine@ga.gov.au. We honour the memory of those who have lost their lives and acknowledge the enormous loss felt by their loved ones.

  • The BMR Yearbooks followed on from and retained the format of the final BMR Annual Report. The 1977 yearbook did not use that word in its title, which was simply BMR77. Later volumes followed this pattern, but added the subtitle: Yearbook of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, and in common usage they became known as the BMR (later AGSO) Yearbooks.

  • In May 2013, Geoscience Australia (GA) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) undertook a collaborative seabed mapping survey (GA0340/ SOL5754) on the Leveque Shelf, a distinct geological province within the Browse Basin, offshore Western Australia. The purpose of the survey was to acquire geophysical and biophysical data on seabed environments over a previously identified potential CO2 injection site to better understand the overlying seabed habitats and to assess potential for fluid migration to the seabed. Mapping and sampling was undertaken across six areas using multibeam and single beam echosounders, sub-bottom profilers, sidescan sonar, underwater towed-video, gas sensors, water column profiler, grab samplers, and vibrocorer. Over 1070 km2 of seabed and water column was mapped using the multibeam and single beam echosounder, in water depths ranging between 40 and 120 m. The sub-surface was investigated using the multichannel and the parametric sub-bottom profilers along lines totalling 730 km and 1547 km in length respectively. Specific seabed features were investigated over 44 line km using the sidescan sonar and physically and sampled at 58 stations. Integration of this newly acquired data with existing seismic data will provide new insights into the geology of the Leveque Shelf. This work will contribute to the Australian Government's National CO2 Infrastructure Plan (NCIP) by providing key seabed environmental and geological data to better inform the assessment of the CO2 storage potential in this area of the Browse Basin. This data package brings together a suite of datasets which describe the seabed environments and shallow geology of the Leveque Shelf, Browse Basin.