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  • Assessment of mineral potential in the Regional Forest Agreement Areas (RFAs) required collating mineral potential tract maps of individual deposit styles to produce composite, cumulative and weighted composite and cumulative maps. To achieve that an Avenue-script based ArcView extension was created to combine grids of mineral potential tract maps. The grids were combined to generate maps which showed either the highest (weighted or non-weighted) or cumulated (weighted or non-weighted) values. Resources and Advice Decision Support System (RADSS) combines features of the ArcView extension used in mineral potential assessments in RFAs and ASSESS. It is an ArcView extension with a 'Wizard'-like main dialog that leads the user through the process of creating an output. The system has the capacity to combine GIS-layers (raster and vector) to produce various mineral potential and other suitability maps.

  • Mineral deposits can be described in terms of their mineral systems, i.e., fluid source, migration pathway, and trap. Source regions are difficult to recognize in seismic images. Many orebodies lie on or adjacent to major fault systems, suggesting that the faults acted as fluid migration pathways through the crust. Large faults often have broad internal zones of deformation fabric, which is anisotropic. This, coupled with the metasomatic effects of fluids moving along faults while they are active, can make the faults seismically reflective. For example, major gold deposits in the Archaean Eastern Goldfields province of Western Australia lie in the hanging-wall block of regional-scale faults that differ from other nearby faults by being highly reflective and penetrating to greater depths in the lower crust. Coupled thermal, mechanical, and fluid-flow modeling supports the theory that these faults were fluid migration pathways from the lower to the upper crust. Strong reflections are also recorded from two deeply penetrating faults in the Proterozoic Mt. Isa province in northeastern Australia. Both are closely related spatially to copper and copper-gold deposits. One, the Adelheid fault, is also adjacent to the large Mt. Isa silver-lead-zinc deposit. In contrast, other deeply penetrating faults that are not intrinsically reflective but are mapped in the seismic section on the basis of truncating reflections have no known mineralization. Regional seismic profiles can therefore be applied in the precompetitive area selection stage of exploration. Applying seismic techniques at the orebody scale can be difficult. Orebodies often have complex shapes and reflecting surfaces that are small compared to the diameter of the Fresnel zone for practical seismic frequencies. However, if the structures and alteration haloes around the orebodies themselves, seismic techniques may be more successful. Strong bedding-parallel reflections were observed from the region of alteration around the Mt. Isa silver-lead-zinc orebodies using high-resolution profiling. In addition, a profile in Tasmania imaged an internally nonreflective bulge within the Que Hellyer volcanics, suggesting a good location to explore for a volcanic hosted massive sulfide deposit. These case studies provide a pointer to how seismic techniques could be applied during mineral exploration, especially at depths greater than those being explored with other techniques.

  • Mapping of outcrop geology on Leonora 1:100 000 map sheet in the Eastern Goldfields, Western Australia, as part of the National Geoscience Mapping Accord (NGMA). Briefly, mapping consists of geological boundaries/units, faults, fractures, folds, veins, dykes, joints, linears, marker beds, trends, structural measurements, and mineral deposits.

  • The product comprises digital outcrop geology and interpreted basement geology layers in ArcInfo, MapInfo and ArcView formats. The data were compiled from geological mapping of the Bogan Gate 100K sheet from 1995 to 1999 by the NSW Geological Survey and AGSO under the NGMA. The data layers are a subset of the Forbes 250K sheet GIS data package.

  • ACRES Update, Issue 22, December 2000 ACRES Archive a National Resource First MODIS poster of Australia

  • ACRES Update, Issue 21, July 2000 Terra Oberving the Earth New Product Catalogue Remote Sensing and emergency management

  • Geoscience Australia, ACRES distribute Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data for a series of epochs or time frames covering Australia. The first epoch is 1972. These data have been produced and provided by the Australian Greenhouse Office (AGO). AGO use the data in their National Carbon Accounting System for monitoring land clearing and revegetation. This data is only available through ACRES and ACRES Landsat Distributors, and not through the AGO. More information is available at <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/acres/prod_ser/agosuite.jsp">http://www.ga.gov.au/acres/prod_ser/agosuite.jsp</a> This data is available in 1:1M tiles or as a full continental Mosaic. Tiles areas are available at: <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/acres/prod_ser/agotilemap.jsp">http://www.ga.gov.au/acres/prod_ser/agotilemap.jsp</a>

  • From 1995 to 2000 information from the federal and state governments was compiled for Comprehensive Regional Assessments (CRA), which formed the basis for Regional Forest Agreements (RFA) that identified areas for conservation to meet targets agreed by the Commonwealth Government with the United Nations. These 5 CDs were created as part of GA's contribution to the SE Queensland CRA. CD1 contains ArcView Legends and Projects, data coverages, shapefiles, all documents and reports and associated maps and figures. CD2 contains various edited versions of covers and shapefiles, original data supplied by custodians, and staff workareas. CD3 contains Landsat, Magnetics etc. images. CD4 contains DEM etc. CD5 contains integration data, miscellaneous ArcInfo grids, and ArcInfo graphic files.

  • Product no longer exists, please refer to GeoCat #30413 for the data

  • Product no longer exists, please refer to GeoCat #30413 for the data