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  • This web service delivers metadata for onshore active and passive seismic surveys conducted across the Australian continent by Geoscience Australia and its collaborative partners. For active seismic this metadata includes survey header data, line location and positional information, and the energy source type and parameters used to acquire the seismic line data. For passive seismic this metadata includes information about station name and location, start and end dates, operators and instruments. The metadata are maintained in Geoscience Australia's onshore active seismic and passive seismic database, which is being added to as new surveys are undertaken. Links to datasets, reports and other publications for the seismic surveys are provided in the metadata.

  • Publicly available data was compiled to provide a common information base for resource development, environmental and regulatory decisions in the north Bowen Basin. This web service summarises oil and gas prospectivity of the north Bowen Basin.

  • <div>Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential.</div><div><br></div><div>The Paleo to Mesoproterozoic Birrindudu Basin is an underexplored frontier basin located in northwestern Northern Territory and northeastern Western Australia. The Birrindudu Basin is a region of focus for the second phase of the EFTF program (2020–2024) as it contains strata of similar age to the prospective McArthur Basin, South Nicholson region and Mount Isa Province, but remains comparatively poorly understood.</div><div><br></div><div>Geoscience Australia have undertaken (via the service provider, FIT, Schlumberger) Fluid Inclusion Petrography and Microthermometry analysis of samples for the drillhole 99VRNTGSDD1, Birrindudu Basin, located in the northwest Northern Territory (Company reference number MT#F1230005c).</div><div><br></div><div>This eCat Record accompanies the report containing the results of fluid inclusion stratigraphy on this drillhole (eCat record 148973).</div>

  • <div>Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential.</div><div><br></div><div>The Paleo to Mesoproterozoic Birrindudu Basin is an underexplored frontier basin located in northwestern Northern Territory and northeastern Western Australia. The Birrindudu Basin is a region of focus for the second phase of the EFTF program (2020–2024) as it contains strata of similar age to the prospective McArthur Basin, South Nicholson region and Mount Isa Province, but remains comparatively poorly understood.</div><div><br></div><div>Geoscience Australia have undertaken (via the service provider, FIT, Schlumberger) Fluid Inclusion Petrography and Microthermometry analysis of samples for the drillhole WLMB001B, Birrindudu Basin, located in the northwest Northern Territory (Company reference number MT#F1230005a).</div><div><br></div><div>This eCat Record accompanies the report containing the results of fluid inclusion stratigraphy on this drillhole (eCat record 148975)</div>

  • <div>Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential.</div><div><br></div><div>The Paleo to Mesoproterozoic Birrindudu Basin is an underexplored frontier basin located in northwestern Northern Territory and northeastern Western Australia. The Birrindudu Basin is a region of focus for the second phase of the EFTF program (2020–2024) as it contains strata of similar age to the prospective McArthur Basin, South Nicholson region and Mount Isa Province, but remains comparatively poorly understood.</div><div><br></div><div>Geoscience Australia have undertaken (via the service provider, FIT, Schlumberger) Fluid Inclusion Petrography and Microthermometry analysis of samples for the drillhole WLMB001B, Birrindudu Basin, located in the northwest Northern Territory (Company reference number MT#FI230004a).</div><div><br></div><div>This eCat Record accompanies the report containing the results of fluid inclusion stratigraphy on this drillhole (eCat record 149178)</div>

  • <div>Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential.</div><div><br></div><div>The Paleo to Mesoproterozoic Birrindudu Basin is an underexplored frontier basin located in northwestern Northern Territory and northeastern Western Australia. The Birrindudu Basin is a region of focus for the second phase of the EFTF program (2020–2024) as it contains strata of similar age to the prospective McArthur Basin, South Nicholson region and Mount Isa Province, but remains comparatively poorly understood.</div><div><br></div><div>Geoscience Australia have undertaken (via the service provider, FIT, Schlumberger) stratigraphic reconstructions of bulk volatile chemistry from fluid inclusions from the drillhole WLMB001B, Birrindudu Basin, located in the northwest Northern Territory.</div><div><br></div><div>This ecat record releases the final report containing the results of fluid inclusion stratigraphy, thin section and microthermometry analyses, raw data files (*.LAS) and rock descriptions by FIT Schlumberger. Company reference number FI230004a.</div>

  • <div>Steelmaking value chains are economically important to Australia, but the need to decarbonize traditional steel-making processes could disrupt existing supply lines. Hydrogen-based iron and steel production offers one pathway for reducing the carbon intensity of steel. Here, we present maps assessing the costs of hydrogen-based direct reduction of iron oxides (to produce hot briquetted iron), optionally coupled with steelmaking in an electric arc furnace (i.e. the H2-DRI-EAF value chain). Developed as part of the Exploring for the Future program and in collaboration with Monash University, these models build off the functionality of the Green Steel Economic Fairways Mapper (beta release), with additional enhancements to the modelling algorithm to reflect constant furnace operation, the incorporation of costings to transport the produced hot briquetted iron or steel to domestic ports, and the optimisation of facility capacities. The capacity of facilities (including solar and wind generation, proton exchange membrane [PEM] electolysis, battery storage, and hydrogen storage tanks) are determined by the 1 Mtpa production target and the local availability of renewable energy resources, as modelled according to 2019 data sourced from the Renewables.Ninja (https://www.renewables.ninja/; Pfenninger & Staffell, 2016; Staffell & Pfenninger, 2016). The high-resolution (approximately 5.5 km pixels) maps reflect our preferred technology cost assumptions (see Wang et al., 2023) for the year 2025. Iron concentrate feedstocks are assumed to cost AU$150 per tonne, reflecting approximate costs for 65 % Fe pellets as derived from magnetite ores. Conversions to USD assume US$1.00 = AU$0.73.</div><div><br></div><div>Geoscience Australia's Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia's geology and resource potential. This leads to a strong economy, resilient society and sustainable environment for the benefit of all Australians. This includes supporting Australia's transition to a low emissions economy, strong resources and agriculture sectors, and economic opportunities and social benefits for Australia's regional and remote communities. The Exploring for the Future program, which commenced in 2016, is an eight year, $225m investment by the Australian Government.</div>

  • <div>This study is part of the Mineral Potential Assessment (MPA) module of Geoscience Australia's Darling-Curnamona-Delamerian (DCD) project, a deep-dive project within the Exploring for the Future Program (EFTF) 2020-2024. An objective of the DCD project is to further the understanding of the geological architecture of the Delamerian Orogen into a cohesive framework enable a regional mineral potential assessment of this under-explored and mostly under cover Orogen. The MPA module is one of eight modules under the umbrella of the DCD project. To facilitate assessment of the mineral potential of the project area, the mineral potential assessment study has 3 key scientific objectives: (1) Defining the characteristics of the mineral systems / prospects. (2)&nbsp;&nbsp;Evaluating the temporal framework of the formation of mineral systems / prospects; and (3) Understanding the regional magma fertility. This study delivers Objective 1, i.e., outlining the principle geological and metallogenic characteristics of reported mineral prospects in the project area.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Legacy drill cores best demonstrating metallogenic features of different mineral system types at key prospects across the project area were selected for viewing and sampling following review of historical exploration reports and assay results. Four sets of data are included in the appendices of this report: (1)&nbsp;&nbsp;HyLogger spectral images of 20 drill holes of 8 prospects in New South Wales. (2)&nbsp;&nbsp;143 high-resolution scan files of legacy drill core samples across the project area. (3)&nbsp;&nbsp;16 microscopic images of thin sections for 4 prospects of the Loch Lilly-Kars Belt, New South Wales. (4)&nbsp;&nbsp;53 Backscattered Electron (BSE) images and 53 Advanced Mineral Identification and Characterization System (AMICS) high-resolution mineral maps of 53 samples from 18 prospects across the whole Delamerian Margin.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Metallogenic characteristics of samples from four different mineral deposit types were studied, along deposits of uncertain affiliation (referred here as undefined systems), including (1) Porphyry-epithermal mineral systems. (2)&nbsp;&nbsp;Volcanic hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) mineral systems. (3)&nbsp;&nbsp;Orogenic gold mineral systems. (4)&nbsp;&nbsp;Mafic-ultramafic Cu-Ni-PGE mineral systems. (5)&nbsp;&nbsp;Metallogenetically undefined systems. Detailed metallogenic characteristics of the samples from 22 key prospects in Delamerian Orogen are documented in this report.&nbsp;&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>This is the first systemic study on the essential metallogenic characteristics of the mineral systems in Delamerian. The characterisations outlined in this report are foundational for understanding the regional metallogenesis and assessing the potential of multiple types of mineral systems in the Delamerian Belt, which should be useful in both academic and the mineral exploration sector.</div><div><br></div><div>The high-resolution BSE and AMICS mineral maps are available at Geoscience Australia. Please reach out to the senior author of this GA Record, Dr. Yanbo Cheng (Yanbo.cheng@ga.gov.au). </div>

  • Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential. The Paleo to Mesoproterozoic Birrindudu Basin is an underexplored frontier basin located in northwestern Northern Territory and northeastern Western Australia. The Birrindudu Basin is a region of focus for the second phase of the EFTF program (2020–2024) as it contains strata of similar age to the prospective McArthur Basin, South Nicholson region and Mount Isa Province, but remains comparatively poorly understood. Geoscience Australia have undertaken (via the service provider, FIT, Schlumberger) stratigraphic reconstructions of bulk volatile chemistry from fluid inclusions from an mineral exploration drillhole LBD2, Birrindudu Basin, located in the northwest Northern Territory This ecat record releases the final report and raw data files (*.LAS) by FIT Schlumberger. Company reference number FI230005a.

  • In the last decade, satellite derived standard land products have increasingly been produced for medium resolution satellites such as Landsat and (more recently) Sentinel-2. These mostly involve estimating surface reflectance and surface temperature. The products generally remove or standardise atmospheric effects with some also normalizing for surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and terrain illumination effects to provide consistent time series and mosaics. The products have been used in various land surface applications, e.g., land cover, fractional cover and water identification, including flooding, crop monitoring and other time series analysis. However, the products are generally not immediately sufficient for applications over persistent water areas, such as estimating water quality, benthic cover, sediment transport, erosion and shallow water bathymetry. These need additional corrections with different physics that are not included in standard land products. In this paper, a method is proposed that treats persistent water areas separately within the standard product and includes corrections not generally applied to the land. The processing has been designed to be fully consistent between water and land in atmospheric correction and definition of reflectance factors so that they can be combined in the same time series and form mosaics. The first step in this process was acquisition of an effective and up to date classification to separate the persistent water and land. The water areas are then atmospherically corrected in the same way as the land but not treated for BRDF or shading effects as are the land areas. For the water areas, adjacency effects are more significant near water-land interfaces and water surface effects have different physics from land surfaces. The extra corrections currently include correction for adjacency effects as well as regional sun glint and sky radiation effects. The water mask and these corrections have been added to the current existing atmospheric, BRDF and terrain corrected surface reflectance product (standard product) from Geoscience Australia (GA). However, at the scale of the Landsat and higher resolution satellite images, residual local surface and bidirectional effects still occur and are discussed in this paper. In this paper, results from the new processing strategy have been compared with GA standard products in test images of Canberra and the North Queensland coast near Ingham and used as a basis to discuss the likely residuals of surface and atmospheric effects and options for the inclusion of methods to overcome them in a standard product. The results show that: • Both inland and sea water signatures behave as expected from other data and models. • Adjacency correction seems most useful where a water-Land interface is close to the water body. • Sky glint removal is sometimes too great in Canberra site when water is shielded by local terrain. • Sun and sky glint correction greatly improves the coast and deep sea water signatures. This Abstract was presented at the 22nd International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (MODSIM2017) Hobart Tasmania (https://www.mssanz.org.au/modsim2017/)