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  • This map is part of the series that covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 513 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and 110 kilometres from north to south. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. The topographic map and data index shows coverage of the sheets. Product Specifications Coverage: The series covers the whole of Australia with 513 maps. Currency: Ranges from 1995 to 2009. 95% of maps have a reliability date of 1994 or later. Coordinates: Geographical and either AMG or MGA (post-1993) Datum: AGD66, GDA94, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Paper, flat and folded copies.

  • This paper was presented at 17th Australian Geological Convention, Hobart, Tasmania

  • Product Specifications Coverage: Partial coverage, predominantly in northern Australia, along major transport routes, and other selected areas. About 1000 maps have been published to date. Currency: Ranges from 1968 to 2006. Coordinates: Geographical and UTM. Datum: AGD66, new edition WGS84; AHD. Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator UTM. Medium: Paper, flat copies only.

  • This paper discusses the applicability of Smalll Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) techniques for determining the porosity, pore size distribution and internal specific surface area in coals. The method is non-invasive, fast, inexpensive and does not require complex sample preparation. It uses coal grains of about 0.7mm size mounted in standard pellets as used for petrographic studies.

  • Product Specifications Coverage: Partial coverage, predominantly in northern Australia, along major transport routes, and other selected areas. About 1000 maps have been published to date. Currency: Ranges from 1968 to 2006. Coordinates: Geographical and UTM. Datum: AGD66, new edition WGS84; AHD. Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator UTM. Medium: Paper, flat copies only.

  • A medium term forecast of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources for the Bonaparte Basin has been generated by Geoscience Australia and reveals that there is the potential to discover 56 gigalitres (350 million barrels) of oil, 82 billion cubic metres (2.9 trillion cubic feet) of gas, and 18 gigalitres (115 million barrels) of condensate in the next ten to fifteen years.

  • Contains boundary and attribute information for parcels of public, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander land in Australia which are greater than 40 hectares. Selected smaller areas are shown by point locations (includes nature reserves, forests and Aboriginal land). Categories include: -nature conservation reserves -forestry reserves -Aboriginal land -water reserves -defence reserves; and -mining reserves. Attribute information includes (as applicable to the type of reserve): -State and reserve name -reserve type -administering authority -size (in hectares) -identification number; and -dates of original proclamation and latest update. Data have been collected for national 1:250,000 scale mapping purposes and may not meet the needs of all users. Free online. Available in ArcInfo Export, ArcView Shapefile and MapInfo mid/mif. NOTE: Data have not been verified by State authorities. Data have been collected for national 1:250,000 scale mapping purposes and may not meet the needs of all users. Product Specifications Coverage: Australia by State Currency: June 1997 (NSW); 1991 (NT); 1987-1991 (QLD); 1986-1990 (SA); April 1991 (Tas and Vic); 1988-1990 (WA) Coordinates: Geographical Datum: AGD66 Format: ArcInfo Export, ArcView Shapefile and MapInfo mid/mif Medium: Free online and CD-ROM (fee applies) Forward Program: Under review

  • Australia's geochemical environment affects our well-being. It directly affects public health, agriculture and mining activities, yet nation-wide geochemical surveys such as conducted in the United Kingdom, Wales and China are yet to be established in Australia. To obtain the most information from geochemical data, appropriate methodologies to analyse the data are essential. This report investigates the use of various methodologies for the assessment and integration of whole-rock geochemical data at regional and local scales. A broad-scale regional study conducted over southeastern Australia, mainly focused on NSW and Victoria, whilst the other was a more specific study conducted over the Bathurst 1:250,000 map sheet area. Regional scale studies have low sample densities and the possibility of sampling bias being incorporated and intensified during data analysis across large areas are high. However, regional scale mapping is a low cost, time efficient way of identifying broad trends and smaller target areas. Accordingly, the methods used on regional data are quick and easy with relatively little data preparation. Mineral occurrence densities were created and concentrations of uranium, lead, zinc, gold and arsenic were overlaid to identify anomalous values. Hot spots for these elements often corresponded to mining districts. However, the analysis highlighted that some anomalous samples related to local mineralisation and should have been removed from the analysis. The Bathurst study area had a higher sample density so more comprehensive analysis was possible. Statistical analysis was conducted which identified spurious data that were then removed from the dataset. The geochemical points were validated to ensure that they were in the correct geological polygon and hence there was a higher confidence in the data than in the regional scale study. The geochemical values were averaged across like geological polygons and trends of elemental concentrations in rock types became apparent. This was important as it allowed the geochemistry to be viewed in its geological context. Both studies indicated that existing whole-rock geochemical data is inappropriate for baseline geochemical surveying due to sample biases associated with the data. It does, however, identify methods that can be applied to the more appropriate data. The studies identified the need for conducting a nation-wide baseline geochemical survey. Benefits of such a survey would include a raised awareness of public health, agricultural, environmental and land use issues, as well as helping to identify mineral resource targets. It is recognised that determining high concentrations of elements is not in itself sufficient as high background concentrations may not lead to the formation of an ore deposit, nor be detrimental to human and animal health. An assessment of bioavailability is critical because elements may occur in stable compounds within the environment hence will not pose a health risk, no matter how high their concentrations. As a follow-on from this study, assessment of element bioavailability is an important step.