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  • Displays the coverage of publicly available digital gamma-ray spectrometric data. The map legend is coloured according to the line spacing of the survey with broader line spacings (lower resolution surveys) displayed in shades of blue. Closer line spacings (higher resolution surveys are displayed in red, purple and coral.

  • A new continental-scale geochemical atlas and dataset for Australia were officially released into the public domain at the end of June 2011. The National Geochemical Survey of Australia (NGSA) project, which started in 2007 under the Australian Government's Onshore Energy Security Program at Geoscience Australia, aimed at filling a huge knowledge gap relating to the geochemical composition of surface and near-surface materials in Australia. Better understanding the concentration levels and spatial distributions of chemical elements in the regolith has profound implications for energy and mineral exploration, as well as for natural resource management. In this world first project, a uniform regolith medium was sampled at an ultra-low density over nearly the entire continent, and subsamples from two depths and two grain-size fractions were analysed using up to three different (total, strong and weak) chemical digestions. This procedure yielded an internally consistent and comprehensive geochemical dataset for 68 chemical elements (plus additional bulk properties). From its inception, the emphasis of the project has been on quality control and documentation of procedures and results, and this has resulted in eight reports (including an atlas containing over 500 geochemical maps) and a large geochemical dataset representing the significant deliverables of this ambitious and innovative project. The NGSA project was carried out in collaboration with the geoscience agencies from every State and the Northern Territory under National Geoscience Agreements. .../...

  • Map compiled on request from AGS Native Title Case QUD6040/2001 Proclamation 3 See 2008/3111 for particulars.

  • The Georgina-Arunta deep seismic reflection line (09GA-GA1) has provided an image of the entire crust in this part of central Australia. At a first approximation, beneath the Neoproterozoic-Devonian sedimentary basins, the crust can be divided into four distinct regions, namely, the Aileron, Irindina and Davenport Provinces, and the Ooratippra Seismic Province. Each of these regions is separated from each other by major, crustal-scale faults. The observed crustal architecture has implications for geodynamic models for the evolution of the region, implying amalgamation of these crustal blocks in the Paleoproterozoic and major shortening and basin inversion in the Paleozoic.

  • Many aspects of the evolution and overall architecture of the Australian southern rifted margin are consistent with current models for the development of non-volcanic rifted margins. However, when examined in detail, several key features of the southern margin provide useful points of comparison with the Atlantic and Alpine Tethyan margins from which these models derive. Extensive petroleum industry and government seismic and geophysical data sets have enabled detailed mapping of the basins of the southern margin and an improved understanding of its tectonostratigraphic evolution. Australia's southern rifted continental margin extends for over 4000 km, from the structurally complex margin south of the Naturaliste Plateau in the west, to the transform plate boundary adjacent to the South Tasman Rise in the east. The margin contains a series of Middle Jurassic to Cenozoic basins-the Bight, Otway, Sorell, Gippsland and Bass basins, and smaller depocentres on the South Tasman Rise (STR). These basins, and the architecture of the margin, evolved through repeated episodes of extension and thermal subsidence leading up to, and following, the commencement of sea-floor spreading between Australia and Antarctica. Break-up took place diachronously along the margin, commencing in the west at ~83 Ma and concluding in the east at ~ 34 Ma. In general, break-up was not accompanied by significant magmatism and the margin is classified as 'non-volcanic' (or magma-poor). Initial NW-SE ultra-slow to slow seafloor spreading (latest Santonian-Early Eocene), followed by N-S directed fast spreading (Middle Eocene-present), resulted in: (1) an E-W oriented obliquely- to normally-rifted marginal segment extending from the westernmost Bight Basin to the central Otway Basin; (2) an approximately N-S oriented transform continental margin in the east (western Tasmania-STR), and (3) a transitional zone between those end-members (southern Otway-Sorell basins).

  • This map shows the estimated extent of surface water in the Tully region shortly after the passing of Tropical Cyclone Yasi (TC Yasi). It has an AVNIR2 imagery background. It's Scale is 1:58,000. The map is a compilation of GA topographic data, surface water extent derived from satellites and imagery.

  • Image showing gravity sation coverage and relative reliability over Australia, updated to May 2011

  • This data set comprises one of three archives of Geoscience Australia work in the project "A Consistent Approach to Groundwater Recharge Determination in Data Poor Areas". The project was carried out by CSIRO and Geoscience Australia and was funded by the National Water Commission Raising National Water Standards program. The data contained included Original data sourced for the project, Final data produced by the project, MXD's of maps created, and tools used within the project. The archives created for this project comprise: 1. Data archive. Data set stored in the GA CDS. Geocat Record number 79804 2. Adminstration and publication archive. Documents stored in TRIM Project P10/67 RECHARGE-DISCHARGE PROJECT 3. References archive. Endnote library located at \\nas\eg\water\References\Recharge_Discharge_Project.enl For more information about the creation of these archives, including the location of files, see TRIM D2014-102808 For more information about the project, see the following references: Leaney F, Crosbie R, O'Grady A, Jolly I, Gow L, Davies P, Wilford J and Kilgour P. 2011. Recharge and discharge estimation in data poor areas: Scientific reference guide. CSIRO: Water for a Healthy Country National Research Flagship. 61 pp (GA Record No. 2011/46 GACat # 71941) Jolly I, Gow L, Davies P, O'Grady A, Leaney F, Crosbie R, Wilford J and Kilgour P. 2011. Recharge and discharge estimation in data poor areas: User guide for the recharge and discharge estimation spreadsheets and MapConnect. CSIRO: Water for a Healthy Country National Research Flagship. 40 pp. (GA Record No. 2011/35 GeoCat # 71940) Pain, C.F., Gow, L.J, Wilford, J.R. and Kilgour, P. 2011. Mapping approaches to recharge and discharge estimation and associated input datasets. A report for CSIRO: Water for a Healthy Country National Research Flagship. (Professional Opinion No. 2011/01 GeoCat # 70392)

  • A comprehensive earthquake impact assessment requires an exposure database with attributes that describe the distribution and vulnerability of buildings in the region of interest. The compilation of such a detailed database will require years to develop for a moderate-sized city, let alone on a national scale. To hasten this database development in the Philippines, a strategy has been employed to involve as many stakeholders/organizations as possible and equip them with a standardized tool for data collection and management. The best organizations to tap are the local government units (LGUs) since they have better knowledge of their respective area of responsibilities and have a greater interest in the use of the database. Such a tool is being developed by PHIVOLCS-DOST and Geoscience Australia. Since there are about 1,495 towns and cities in the country with varying financial capacities, this tool should involve the use of affordable hardware and software. It should work on ordinary hardware, such as an ordinary light laptop or a netbook that can easily be acquired by these LGUs. The hardware can be connected to a GPS and a digital camera to simultaneously capture images of structures and their location. The system uses an open source database system for encoding the building attributes and parameters. A user-friendly GUI with a simplified drop-down menu, containing building classification schema, developed in consultation with local engineers, is utilised in this system. The resulting national database is integrated by PHIVOLCS-DOST and forms part of the Rapid Earthquake Damage Assessment System (REDAS), a hazard simulation tool that is also made available freely to partner local government units.

  • One of the important inputs to a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment is the expected rate at which earthquakes within the study region. The rate of earthquakes is a function of the rate at which the crust is being deformed, mostly by tectonic stresses. This paper will present two contrasting methods of estimating the strain rate at the scale of the Australian continent. The first method is based on statistically analysing the recently updated national earthquake catalogue, while the second uses a geodynamic model of the Australian plate and the forces that act upon it. For the first method, we show a couple of examples of the strain rates predicted across Australia using different statistical techniques. However no matter what method is used, the measurable seismic strain rates are typically in the range of 10-16s-1 to around 10-18s-1 depending on location. By contrast, the geodynamic model predicts a much more uniform strain rate of around 10-17s-1 across the continent. The level of uniformity of the true distribution of long term strain rate in Australia is likely to be somewhere between these two extremes. Neither estimate is consistent with the Australian plate being completely rigid and free from internal deformation (i.e. a strain rate of exactly zero). This paper will also give an overview of how this kind of work affects the national earthquake hazard map and how future high precision geodetic estimates of strain rate should help to reduce the uncertainty in this important parameter for probabilistic seismic hazard assessments.