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  • This appendix provides a regional geological analysis and conceptualisation of the Cooper GBA region. It delivers information critical for the shale, tight and deep coal gas prospectivity assessment outlined in the petroleum prospectivity technical appendix (Lech et al., 2019), and for input into assessing the potential impacts on groundwater and surface water assets detailed in the hydrogeology (Evans et al., 2019) and hydraulic fracturing (Kear et al., 2019) technical appendices. The Cooper Basin is a Carboniferous to Triassic intracratonic basin in north-eastern South Australia and south-western Queensland. It has a total area of approximately 127,000 km2, of which about three quarters lies within Queensland and the remainder lies within South Australia. Section 2 provides a comprehensive inventory and review of existing open data and information for the Cooper GBA region relevant for the prospectivity assessment (see the petroleum prospectivity technical appendix (Lech et al., 2019)) and hydrogeological characterisation (see the hydrogeology technical appendix (Evans et al., 2019)). It includes discussion of the datasets incorporated in the data inventory. A broad range of datasets were utilised to develop a three-dimensional conceptualisation of the geological basin. These include: geographic and cultural datasets which details the location and nature of administrative boundaries, infrastructure and topography; and geological datasets such as surface geology and geological provinces, well and seismic data and geophysical data. A range of public domain publications, reports and data packages for the Cooper Basin are also utilised to characterise the basin architecture and evolution. Section 3 reviews the Cooper Basin’s geological setting and the GBA region’s basin evolution from pre-Permian basement to creation of the Cooper, Eromanga and Lake Eyre basins. Section 4 reviews the main structural elements of the Cooper Basin and how these relate to the basin’s stratigraphy and evolution. The base of the Cooper Basin succession sits at depths of up to 4500 m, and reaches thicknesses in excess of 2400 m. The Cooper Basin is divided into north-eastern and south-western areas, which show different structural and sedimentary histories, and are separated by a series of north-west–south-east trending ridges. In the south-west the Cooper Basin unconformably overlies lower Paleozoic sediments of the Warburton Basin, and includes three major troughs (Patchawarra, Nappamerri and Tenappera troughs) separated by ridges (the Gidgealpa–Merrimelia–Innamincka and Murteree ridges). The depocentres include a thick succession of Permian to Triassic sediments (the Gidgealpa and Nappamerri groups) deposited in fluvio-glacial to fluvio-lacustrine and deltaic environments. The north-eastern Cooper Basin overlies Devonian sediments associated with the Adavale Basin. Here the Permian succession is thinner than in the south-west, and the major depocentres, including the Windorah Trough and Ullenbury Depression, are generally less well defined. The Cooper Basin is entirely and disconformably overlain by the Jurassic–Cretaceous Eromanga Basin. In the Cooper GBA region the Eromanga Basin includes two major depocentres, the Central Eromanga Depocentre and the Poolowanna Trough, and exceeds thicknesses of 2500 m. Deposition within the Eromanga Basin was relatively continuous and widespread and was controlled by subsidence rates and plate tectonic events along the eastern margins of the Australian Plate. The Eromanga Basin is comprised of a succession of terrestrial and marine origin. It includes a basal succession of terrestrial sedimentary rocks, followed by a middle marine succession, then finally an upper terrestrial succession. The Lake Eyre Basin is a Cenozoic sedimentary succession overlying the Eromanga Basin, covering parts of northern and eastern South Australia, south-eastern Northern Territory, western Queensland and north-western New South Wales. The Lake Eyre Basin is subdivided into sub-basins, with the northern part of the Callabonna Sub-basin overlying the Cooper Basin. Here the basin is up to 300 m thick and contains sediments deposited from the Paleocene through to the Quaternary. Deposition within the Lake Eyre Basin is recognised to have occurred in three phases, punctuated by periods of tectonic activity and deep weathering. This technical appendix provides the conceptual framework to better understand the potential connectivity between the Cooper Basin and overlying aquifers of the Great Artesian Basin and to help understand potential impacts of shale, tight and deep coal gas development on water and water-dependent assets.

  • Assessing the regional prospectivity of tight, shale and deep coal gas resources in the Cooper Basin is an integral component of the Australian Government’s Geological and Bioregional Assessment Program, which aims to encourage exploration and understand the potential impacts of resource development on water and the environment. The Permo-Triassic Cooper Basin is Australia’s premier onshore conventional hydrocarbon-producing province, yet is relatively underexplored for unconventional gas resources. A chance of success mapping workflow, using rapid integration of new and existing data, was developed to evaluate the regional distribution of key gas plays within the Gidgealpa Group. For each play type, key physical properties (e.g. lithology, formation depths and extents, source rock and reservoir characteristics, and rock mechanics) were identified and criteria were used to assign prospectivity rankings. Parameter maps for individual physical properties were classified, weighted and then combined into prospectivity confidence maps that represent each play’s relative chance of success. These combined maps show a high chance of success for tight, shale and deep coal gas plays in the Nappamerri, Patchawarra and Windorah troughs, largely consistent with exploration results to-date. The outputs of this regional screening process help identify additional areas warranting investigation, and may encourage further exploration investment in the basin. This methodology can be applied to other unconventional hydrocarbon plays in frontier and proven basins.

  • GA publication: Flyer AEIP, ELVIS, EM-LINK 2021

  • Geoscience Australia is Australia’s Earth science public sector organisation, recognised for its expert data capabilities and high level of expertise. As the nation’s trusted advisor on geology and geography the organisation is the premium provider of data, science and analysis for decision makers. Internally, Geoscience Australia is currently targeting and refining its core capabilities in order to establish and clearly articulate our value proposition and service offering to stakeholders.

  • This document sets out the five year strategy for the marine geoscience program at Geoscience Australia, for the period 2018-2023. This strategy delivers to Geoscience Australia's Strategy 2028 in the area of 'Managing Australia's marine jurisdictions to support sustainable use of our marine environment.' The strategy includes four key activities: (1) National Coordination of Seabed Mapping; (2) Data Acquisition for Marine and Coastal Baselines and Monitoring; (3) Marine Geoscience Data Accessibility, and; (4) Marine Geoscience Advice.

  • This dataset provides the locations and status, as at 30 June 2020, of Australian operating mines, mines under development, mines on care and maintenance and resource deposits associated with critical minerals. Developing mines are deposits where the project has a positive feasibility study, development has commenced or all approvals have been received. Mines under care and maintenance and resource deposits are based on known resource estimations and may produce critical minerals in the future.

  • This report presents a summary of the groundwater and surface water hydrochemistry data release from the Daly River project conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. This data release records the groundwater sample collection methods and hydrochemistry and isotope data from monitoring bores in the Daly River project area, Northern Territory (NT). The Daly River project is a collaborative study between Geoscience Australia and the NT Government. Hydrochemistry and isotope data were collected from existing bores in the Daly River area. The sampling methods, quality assurance/quality control procedures, analytical methods and results are included in this report and all hydrochemistry data are available for download from the link at right.

  • This report presents a summary of the groundwater and surface water hydrochemistry data release from the Howard East project conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF) —an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. This data release records the groundwater and surface water sample collection methods and hydrochemistry and isotope data from monitoring bores in the Howard East project area, Northern Territory (NT). The Howard East project is a collaborative study between Geoscience Australia and the NT Government. Hydrochemistry and isotope data were collected from existing bores in the Howard East area. The sampling methods, quality assurance/quality control procedures, analytical methods and results are included in this report and all hydrochemistry data are available for download from the link at right.

  • Geochemical surveys conducted by BMR since 1980 in the southern Kakadu region have highlighted the natural occurrence in specific areas of well above crustal concentrations of uranium, thorium, arsenic, mercury and lead. The natural levels of concentration in the land and possibly the water systems of the South Alligator Valley area could constitute an environmental hazard. A large part of this area coincides with the area delineated as the "sickness country". SUBMISSION TO THE RESOURCE ASSESSMENT COMMISSION BY THE BUREAU OF MINERAL RESOURCES, GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS.

  • Waukarlycarly 1 is a stratigraphic well drilled in the southern part of the Canning Basin’s Waukarlycarly Embayment under Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Western Australia to provide stratigraphic data for this poorly understood tectonic component. The well intersects a thin Cenozoic section, overlying Permian–Carboniferous fluvial clastics and glacial diamictites, with a thick pre-Carboniferous succession (855–2585 mRT) unconformably overlying the Neoproterozoic metasediments. Three informal siliciclastic intervals were defined based on the data from core lithology, well logs, fluid inclusions, chemical and mineral compositions; an Upper Sandstone (855–1348.1 mRT), a Middle Interval (1348.1–2443.4 mRT) and a Lower Sandstone (2443.4 –2585 mRT). The Middle Interval was further divided into six internal zones. Conventional methods were applied to interpret effective porosity, water saturation and elastic properties (Poisson’s ratio and Young’s modulus). Artificial neural network technology was employed on well logs to interpret the total organic carbon (TOC) content, pyrolysis products from the cracking of organic matter (S2), permeability, and mineral compositions. In the Upper Sandstone, average sandstone porosity and permeability are 17.9% and 464.5 mD and, 6.75 % and 10 mD in the Lower Sandstone. The Middle Interval claystone has an average porosity and permeability of 4.17 % and 0.006 mD, and average TOC content and S2 of 0.17 wt% and 0.047 mg HC/g rock with maximum values of 0.66 wt% and 0.46 mg HC/g rock. Average Poisson’s ratio and Young’s modulus of the claystone are 0.154 and 9.81 GPa. Correlations of mineral compositions, petrophysical, geomechanical and geochemical properties of the Middle Interval have been conducted. Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio are well correlated with the contents of key minerals, including Quartz, carbonates and TotalClay. Although TOC content is low at Waukarlycarly 1, hydrocarbon generation and migration have occurred elsewhere in the Waukarlycarly Embayment. The helium response just above the Neoproterozoic basement in the FIS profile is not associated with the hydrocarbon responses implying that these fluids have different sources.