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  • This OGC conformant web service delivers data from Geoscience Australia's Reservoir, Facies and Hydrocarbon Shows (RESFACS) Database. RESFACS is an interpretative reservoir/facies database containing depth-based information regarding permeability, porosity, shows, depositional environment and biostratigraphy of petroleum wells.

  • Geoscience Australia commissioned reprocessing of selected legacy 2D seismic data in the Pedirka-Simpson Basin in South Australia-Northern Territory as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. 34 Legacy 2D seismic lines from the Pedirka Basin were reprocessed between May 2021 and January 2022 (phase 1). An additional 54 legacy 2D seismic lines (34 lines from Pedirka Basin, South Australia and 20 lines from Simpson Basin, Northern Territory) were reprocessed between November 2021 and June 2022 (phase 2). Geofizyka Toruń S.A. based in Poland carried out the data processing and Geoscience Australia with the help of an external contractor undertook the quality control of the data processing. The seismic data release package contains reprocessed seismic data acquired between 1974 and 2008. In total, the package contains approximately 3,806.9 km of industry 2D reflection seismic data. The seismic surveys include the Beal Hill, 1974; Pilan Hill, 1976; Koomarinna, 1980; Christmas Creek, 1982; Hogarth, 1984; Morphett, 1984; Colson 2D, 1985; Etingimbra, 1985; Fletcher, 1986; Anacoora, 1987; Mitchell, 1987; Bejah, 1987; Simpson Desert, 1979, 1984, 1986, 1987; Forrest, 1988; Eringa Trough, 1994; Amadeus-Pedirka, 2008 and covers areas within the Amadeus Basin, Simpson Basin, Pedirka Basin, Warburton Basin and Cooper Basin in South Australia and Northern Territory. The objective of the seismic reprocessing was to produce a processed 2D land seismic reflection dataset using the latest processing techniques to improve resolution and data quality over legacy processing. In particular, the purpose of the reprocessing was to image the structure and stratigraphic architecture of the Neoproterozoic to Late Palaeozoic Amadeus Basin, Triassic Simpson Basin, Cambrian–Devonian Warburton Basin, Permian–Triassic Pedirka Basin and Cooper Basin. All vintages were processed to DMO stack, Pre-stack Time Migration and Post-Stack Time Migration. <b>Data is available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 146309</b>

  • <div>This record presents nine new zircon and titanite U–Pb geochronological data, obtained via Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP) for seven samples of plutonic rocks from the Lachlan Orogen and the Cobar Basin, plus one garnet-bearing skarn vein from the Cobar region. Many of these new ages improve existing constraints on the timing of mineralisation in the Cobar Basin, as part of an ongoing Geochronology Project (Metals in Time), conducted by the Geological Survey of New South Wales (GSNSW) and Geoscience Australia (GA) under a National Collaboration Framework (NCF) agreement. The results herein (summarised in Table 1.1) correspond to zircon and titanite U–Pb SHRIMP analysis undertaken on GSNSW Mineral Systems projects over July 2017–June 2019.</div><div><br></div><div>Our new data establish an episode of c. 427–425 Ma I-type plutonism, coeval with regional S-type granites, which marginally predated opening of the Cobar Basin. Widespread S-type and high-level I-type magmatism accompanied 423–417 Ma basin development. At least two episodes of skarn-related mineralisation are recognised in the southern Cobar Basin: c. 387 Ma (from pre-mineralisation skarn veins) at Kershaws prospect, and c. 403 Ma at the adjacent Hera mine (Fitzherbert et al., 2021).</div><div><br></div><div>Three intrusive rocks were dated at the Norma Vale prospect in the southwestern Cobar Basin, where calcic iron-copper skarn mineralisation is thought to have been caused by I-type but compositionally complex high-level intrusive rocks emplaced along a northeast-oriented fault related to the nearby Rookery Fault (Fitzherbert et al., 2017). A 423 ± 8 Ma I-type quartz diorite potentially constrains the timing of skarn mineralisation, but is indistinguishable in age from a 421.3 ± 3.0 Ma S-type cordierite-biotite granite and a 417.5 ± 3.3 Ma coarse-grained S-type granite, both from deeper in the same drillhole. These results suggest that at least some of the coeval S-type and high-level I-type magmatic activity accompanying opening of the Cobar Basin was associated with early mineralisation, although skarn-forming processes regionally are complex and episodic (Fitzherbert et al., 2021).</div><div><br></div><div>In the Cobar mining belt, our new date of 422.8 ± 2.8 Ma for I-type rhyolitic porphyry at Carissa Shaft (which is one of the southernmost high-level intrusions associated with the Perseverance and Queen Bee orebodies) is coeval with the 423.2 ± 3.5 Ma ‘Peak rhyolite’ (Black, 2007), but marginally older than the 417.6 ± 3.0 Ma Queen Bee Porphyry (Black, 2005). At Gindoono, a 423.0&nbsp;±&nbsp;2.6&nbsp;Ma unnamed dacitic porphyry intruded and hornfelsed the undated I-type Majuba Volcanics, thereby establishing a minimum age for that unit.</div><div><br></div><div>East of Cobar, the I-type Wild Wave Granodiorite intruded the Ordovician Girilambone Group, but was exhumed and eroded to form clasts within pebble conglomerates of the lowermost Cobar Basin. Its new U–Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 424.1 ± 2.8 Ma constrains the timing of I-type plutonism which marginally predated formation of the Cobar Basin. A similar zircon age of 426.7 ± 2.3 Ma was obtained from the concealed Fountaindale Granodiorite north of Condoblin, indicating that this I-type pluton is coeval with the nearby and much larger c. 427 Ma S-type Erimeran Granite. Titanite from the same sample of Fountaindale Granodiorite yielded an age of 421.6 ± 2.7 Ma, which is significantly younger than the zircon age, and is interpreted to constrain the timing of ‘deuteric’ (chlorite-albite-epidote-titanite-sericite-carbonate) alteration during post-magmatic hydrothermal activity (e.g. Blevin, 2003b).</div><div><br></div><div>A garnet-bearing skarn vein at Kershaws prospect, adjacent to the Hera orebody (Fitzherbert et al., 2021), predates the main phase of mineralisation, and yielded a titanite age of 387.2 ±&nbsp;6.2&nbsp;Ma. This indicates that the skarn-forming hydrothermal event at Kershaws prospect is significantly younger than the c. 403 Ma age for the main mineralising event at Hera mine (Fitzherbert et al., 2021).</div>

  • We describe a vision for a national-scale heavy mineral (HM) map generated through automated mineralogical identification and quantification of HMs contained in floodplain sediments from large catchments covering most of Australia. The composition of the sediments reflects the dominant rock types in each catchment, with the generally resistant HMs largely preserving the mineralogical fingerprint of their host protoliths through the weathering-transport-deposition cycle. Heavy mineral presence/absence, absolute and relative abundance, and co-occurrence are metrics useful to map, discover and interpret catchment lithotype(s), geodynamic setting, magmatism, metamorphic grade, alteration and/or mineralization. Underpinning this vision is a pilot project, focusing on a subset from the national sediment sample archive, which is used to demonstrate the feasibility of the larger, national-scale project. We preview a bespoke, cloud-based mineral network analysis (MNA) tool to visualize, explore and discover relationships between HMs as well as between them and geological settings or mineral deposits. We envisage that the Heavy Mineral Map of Australia and MNA tool will contribute significantly to mineral prospectivity analysis and modeling, particularly for technology critical elements and their host minerals, which are central to the global economy transitioning to a more sustainable, lower carbon energy model. The full, peer-reviewed article can be found here: Caritat, P. de, McInnes, B.I.A., Walker, A.T., Bastrakov, E., Rowins, S.M., Prent, A.M. 2022. The Heavy Mineral Map of Australia: vision and pilot project. Minerals, 12(8), 961, https://doi.org/10.3390/min12080961

  • The seabed morphology mapping were developed as ArcGIS Pro Python tools using Python 3+ to map 10 bathymetric high and eight bathymetric low features according to the definitions of Dove et al. (2020). These tools are contained in the following six toolboxes: 1. BathymetricHigh.pyt toolbox contains three tools: TPI Tool Bathymetric High, TPI LMI Tool Bathymetric High and Openness Tool Bathymetric High. These tools are used to map bathymetric high features. 2. BathymetricLow.pyt toolbox contains three tools: TPI Tool Bathymetric Low, TPI CI Tool Bathymetric Low and Openness Tool Bathymetric Low. These tools are used to map bathymetric low features. 3. AddAttributes.pyt toolbox contains six tools: Add Shape Attributes High Tool, Add Shape Attributes Low Tool, Add Topographic Attributes High Tool, Add Topographic Attributes Low Tool, Add Profile Attributes High Tool and Add Profile Attributes Low Tool. These tools are used to calculate attributes for bathymetric high and low features. 4. ClassificationFeature.pyt toolbox contains two tools: Classify Bathymetric High Features and Classify Bathymetric Low Features. These tools are used to classify bathymetric high and low features into morphological categories defined in Dove et al. (2020). 5. Accessory_Tools.pyt toolbox contains two tools: Merge Connected Features Tool and Connect Nearby Linear Features Tool. They are the accessory tools use to help the mapping processes. 6. Surface.pyt toolbox contains two tools: Morphological Surface Tool Bathymetry and Morphological Surface Tool Slope. These tools are used to map three-class morphological surface. The system and data format requirements of these ArcGIS tools are described in the tutorials accompanied with the tools. The tutorials also include sampled data and the detailed usages for individual tools. Further details of these tools including their descriptions, graphic illustrations and usages and python code examples are also available in their metadata. Dove, D., Nanson, R., Bjarnadóttir, L., Guinan, J., Gafeira, J., Post, A., Dolan, M.; Stewart, H.; Arosio, R, Scott, G. (October, 2020). A two-part seabed geomorphology classification scheme (v.2); Part 1: morphology features glossary. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4075248

  • The AusSeabed Marine Data Portal provides openly accessible seabed data to users. This report details the results and recommendations following a community survey on the portals functionality and usability. The report informs future development of the AusSeabed Marine Data Portal to ensure it meets end-user needs.

  • AusSeabed (ASB) conducted a point in time assessment of the service (The Service) to identify what, if any, improvements could be made to the usability, accessibility, presentation and collection of marine specific information and data between April and August 2020. The assessment was an opportunity to apply an independent critical eye of the services AusSeabed provides and gain valuable insights about what working well and what’s not working well. This will help the AusSeabed team identify improvements and form a backlog of activities and enhancements. The following document provides and overview of the assessment process, the assessment and summarises the insights gained from the assessment.

  • <div>Historically, isotopic data are collected at the individual sample level on local- to regional-scale features and are dispersed among decades of both published and unpublished individual academic literature, university theses and geological survey reports, in disparate formats and with widely varying levels of detail. Consequently, it has been difficult to visualise or interrogate the collective value of age and isotopic data at continental-scale. Geoscience Australia’s (GA) continental-scale Isotopic Atlas of Australia (Fraser et al., 2020), breaks this cycle of single-use science by compiling and integrating <strong>multiple radiometric age and isotopic tracer datasets</strong> and making them publicly accessible and useable through GA’s Exploring for the Future (EFTF) Portal.</div><div><br></div><div>The first iteration of a continental-scale Isotopic Atlas of Australia was introduced by Geoscience Australia at the 2019 SGGMP conference in Devonport, Tasmania, through a talk and poster display. In the three years since, progress on this Isotopic Atlas has continued and expanded datasets are now publicly available and downloadable via Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future (EFTF) Geochronology and Isotopes Data Portal.&nbsp;</div>

  • Groundwater is critical to Australia’s future economic development and is the only reliable water source for many regional and rural communities. It also sustains environmental and cultural assets including springs and groundwater-dependent ecosystems. The demand for groundwater in Australia is expected to increase with population growth, economic development and climate change. Geoscience Australia, in partnership with Commonwealth, State and Territory governments is delivering national and regional groundwater investigations through the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) Program to support water management decisions. Geoscience Australia’s groundwater studies apply innovative geoscience tools and robust geoscientific workflows to increase knowledge and understanding of groundwater systems and assessment of groundwater resource potential for economies, communities and the environment. Through integrating geological and hydrogeological data, airborne electromagnetic and ground-based geophysical, hydrogeochemical and remote sensing data, we have developed new geological and hydrogeological conceptual models and identified potential managed aquifer recharge sites in a number of areas across Northern Australia. The EFTF program is focussed on improving our understanding of Australia's groundwater through a National Groundwater Systems project as well as two regional-scale groundwater investigations in Southern Australia. We are commencing an inventory of Australia’s groundwater systems in onshore basins that includes a compilation and broad interpretation of hydrogeological information. This is the basis for the collation and curation of nationally seamless groundwater information to support informed decision making and water resource coordination across jurisdictions. All data and value-added products are freely available for public use via the Exploring for the Future Data Discovery portal (https://portal.ga.gov.au/). This Abstract was submitted to the 2022 Australasian Groundwater Conference 21-23 November (https://agc2022.com.au/)

  • The Southeast Tasmania and Southern Macquarie Ridge Bathymetry dataset was acquired by the Australian Geological Survey Organisation (AGSO) (Geoscience Australia predecessor) during the AUSTREA-2 marine survey undertaken from 15 January - 9 February 2000 onboard the French Oceanographic and Geoscience Research Vessel N/O L'Atalante using a Simrad EM12D multibeam sonar system. The survey was completed as part of the work to map the foot-of-slope position to support definition of Australia's legal Continental Shelf under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. This dataset contains 120m-, 160m-, 250m-, 280m-, 300m-, 360m- and 440m-resolution 32-bit floating point GeoTIFF files of the bathymetry in the survey area, derived from the processed EM12D bathymetry data, using CARIS HIPS and SIPS software. This dataset is not to be used for navigational purposes.